StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Teaching children with dyslexia - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
This essay describes that a dyslexic young learner who experiences problems acquiring vital literacy and reading skills can have their general learning compounded with trauma, especially when their peers mock them within the learning environment…
Download full paper File format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER97.6% of users find it useful
Teaching children with dyslexia
Read Text Preview

Extract of sample "Teaching children with dyslexia"

Download file to see previous pages Owing to the difficulty in diagnosis of the condition, some educators may be essentially baffled by the behavior of a child whose poor performance is mistakenly seen to originate from carelessness (Subramaniam, Mallan, & Mat, 2013). Teachers may punish these students or enroll them in unnecessary remedial lessons, which may make them feel very much underrated, or overburdened in a learning facility. Whereas it may be difficult to differentiate between children who are careless in the classroom and those with dyslexia, it is the responsibility of an effective teacher to create an atmosphere that is favorable for learning by all the pupils. This would enhance early diagnoses for dyslexia and facilitate the implementation of specialized care to cater for the unique educational needs of such students.  Owing to the difficulty in diagnosis of the condition, some educators may be essentially baffled by the behavior of a child whose poor performance is mistakenly seen to originate from carelessness (Subramaniam, Mallan, & Mat, 2013). Teachers may punish these students or enroll them in unnecessary remedial lessons, which may make them feel very much underrated, or overburdened in a learning facility. Whereas it may be difficult to differentiate between children who are careless in the classroom and those with dyslexia, it is the responsibility of an effective teacher to create an atmosphere that is favorable for learning by all the pupils. This would enhance early diagnoses for dyslexia and facilitate the implementation of specialized care to cater for the unique educational needs of such students.   Husni and Jamaludin (2009) argue that it behaves a class teacher to comprehend the learning challenges that a dyslexic student may experience within the learning environment. With this awareness, teachers would avoid chances of misconstruing the behavior of a child, which may impair their normal learning processes. In a cordial environment full of motivation, a dyslexic student will develop the perception of self-reliance, which basically yields educational success (Amstrong, 2012). Teaching a dyslexic child requires the knowledge that an impaired auditory short term memory, which results from the disease can result in the student having a poorer capacity to retain the teacher’s input for long.’s input for long. In light of this, an effective teacher should adopt simpler, repetitive teaching strategies when issuing instructions to a class of dyslexic children in order to secure their better understanding of the lessons.
Subramaniam, Mallan and Mat (2013) have pointed out that auditory short term memory impairment in a child can impede the victim’s ability to remember the teacher’s input of spoken words, arrangement of sounds in order, and the adequate spelling of the letters. In most cases, children with these learning problems cannot recall even simple instructions. Regardless of the seriousness of the impacts of the impairment, proper teaching interventions in the class have proven advantageous to the victims.
Managing the short-term memory
Managing the short-term memory is vital to the achievement of better outcomes in the classroom. Teaching a dyslexic child requires the development of the lesson outline, and ending each lesson with a scorecard of the themes covered. By doing so, vital information related to learning will be retained in the child’s memory for longer (Amstrong, 2012). This can also be essential when setting the homework. Teachers should ensure that the dyslexic child properly notes down what is required. Instructors should also ensure that the child carries home the right writing materials.
Although a majority of such would find it difficult to remember telephone contacts of their friends, it is important for teachers to have them note down a few contacts on the homework book to facilitate consultation when they face any difficulty remembering the recommended work (Amstrong, 2012). Teachers should also ensure that they use written form of communication for learning activities, since verbal communication would be forgotten easily.
A teacher for a dyslexic child should monitor the performance and behavior of the child on a daily ...Download file to see next pages Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Teaching children with dyslexia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words”, n.d.)
Teaching children with dyslexia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/education/1492685-teaching-children-with-dyslexia
(Teaching Children With Dyslexia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words)
Teaching Children With Dyslexia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words. https://studentshare.org/education/1492685-teaching-children-with-dyslexia.
“Teaching Children With Dyslexia Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/education/1492685-teaching-children-with-dyslexia.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Teaching children with dyslexia

Dyslexia

... a foreign language was also found to be a challenge among dyslexics and so is memorizing words and concepts. In extreme cases, a very small population of dyslexics was known to rotate letters when reading reverse words when they write. In the study of Morton and Frith, they mapped the causal theories of dyslexia to have come from “biological, cognitive, behavioral and environmental influences, using the Morton-Frith structured approach” (375). The environmental causality of dyslexia is the teaching and learning environment of the dyslexic and the behavioral may be the literacy outcome of such environment (383). The process of teaching and learning is the cognitive process. There are conflicting theory of what causes dyslexia...
8 Pages (2000 words) Research Paper

Dyslexia

... in transmitting dyslexia from parents to offspring. Chromosome 1p, chromosome 2p11, chromosome 3, chromosome 6p, a locus on long arm of chromosome 15 are recognized as the transmitter genes for the dyslexia. A person with dyslexia cannot read properly and spells the words incorrectly even if he possesses a normal IQ level (Hall & Guyton 2011 p 718; Snowling 2011 p1-28). A study conducted by Lubs and his colleagues in the year 1988 highlighted the involvement of the chromosome 15 in the development of dyslexia in 30 percent of cases. Dyslexic children face numerous problems as they progress academically. In preschool children the diagnosis of dyslexia is not easy because he or she is not supposed to read and write. But these children show...
4 Pages (1000 words) Research Paper

Teaching Children with Dyslexia in Mainstream Schools

...?Teaching Children with Dyslexia in Mainstream Schools Introduction- What is Dyslexia? Swarbrick and Marshall (2004 that, “Dyslexia is a learning disability that primarily affects one’s ability to learn to read and develop a strong understanding of language.” Dyslexia is not just related to difficulties faced in reading; instead, it also involves difficulties in “oral communication, organizational skills, following instructions, and telling time” (Swarbrick & Marshall 2004:1). Hence, dyslexic children may also be disorganized, having poor time management skills and memorizing potential. Children with dyslexia have many strengths and competencies despite their learning disability. However, the disability changes its context over time...
8 Pages (2000 words) Essay

Dyslexia

...Dyslexic children with specific learning difficulties: an analysis Introduction Dyslexia is a learning disorder that shows itself as a difficulty of reading, spelling and in some cases mathematics. Reading difficulties resulting from other causes, such as a non-neurological and deficiency with vision or hearing, or from poor reading instruction. Dyslexia is suspect to be the result of a neurological defect and though not sound disability and it is diagnosed in people of all levels of intelligence. Even though there are many definitions available for the disorder called dyslexia, it is important to refer to the definition of “The World Federation of Neurology’: “Specific developmental dyslexia is a disorder manifested by difficulty learning...
14 Pages (3500 words) Essay

Dyslexia: Teachers Effective Learning and Teaching Approaches with Children with Dyslexia

... of Dyslexia: Teachers Effective Learning and Teaching Approaches with Children with Dyslexia Word count: 7479 Abstract Dyslexia is a disorder which is related with learning disabilities that is present in both children and adults. It is generally stated that individuals who experience this disorder have extraordinary skills in creativity, arts and others. Furthermore this disorder can be treated and due to this there have been a lot of learning theories and approaches that have emerged. The objective of this paper is to highlight how Teachers Effective Learning and Teaching Approaches with Children with Dyslexia make a contribution in the lives of dyslexic individuals. This paper is divided into five sections, in the first...
30 Pages (7500 words) Essay

Teaching Exceptional Children

...Teaching exceptional children "There are no learning disabilities. There are only teaching disabilities. Each child wants to succeed and each childis successful on his own time line." Dr. Jane Snider “Every student can learn. Just not on the same day or in the same way.” George Evans Introduction Education is a fundamental right of every child. Educational institutions across the United States promote the cause of inclusive education, and stand by the maxim ‘equal education for all’ in a bid to provide inclusive education to one and all regardless of their various differences. However, not all children are same, in terms of learning abilities – some are regular, in terms of learning and physical abilities while some have restricted...
6 Pages (1500 words) Research Paper

Teaching science to children

... to grasp the best ways that students can be taught these methods. 1. Introduction: Science teaches an understanding of the world around us by stimulating a child’s prediction and analysis of natural phenomena. Teaching science involves conducting methods of Investigation to encourage creative thought and to demonstrate how science can have an immense impact on our future and to achieve advanced medical biotechnology, genetic engineering food production and safety, agricultural biotechnology, and treatment of environmental waste. Teaching science also aims to improve children’s verbal and writing skills to become more scientifically literate (N.A. 2009). Effective teaching style requires the adaptation of successful principles and methods...
16 Pages (4000 words) Essay

Dyslexia

... can be helpful. 4.2. Accommodations used to support the process of a student with dyslexia Teaching students with dyslexia within settings is a problem. Below are some accommodations that special and general education teachers may utilize in the classroom of heterogeneous students. 4.3. Accommodations Involving Interactive Instruction Moore DR (2007), the duty of getting students’ attention and ensure they are engaged for a period of time needs majority of managing and teaching skills (Ahissar M, November 2007). Students with problem in following directions are usually assisted by asking them to repeat those directions in their own words. Some accommodations to enhance successful interactive instructional practices are: Maintain daily...
6 Pages (1500 words) Essay

Dyslexia in Children

Handler & Fierson explain the challenges caused by dyslexia. There are four major challenges; dysgraphia, attention deficit disorder, auditory processing disorder, and developmental coordination disorder. Dysgraphia leads to impaired automaticity during letter writing. Auditory processing disorder minimizes the capabilities of processing auditory information. Developmental coordination disorder illustrates the challenges of performing routine activities that require balance. Ise & Schulte illustrates the spelling challenges that children with dyslexia experience. The attention deficit disorder mainly results in the learning challenges relating to spelling.
There is a great difference between children with and without th...
5 Pages (1250 words) Annotated Bibliography

The State and the Impact That Homelessness Has on Children in Miami-Dade

Miami-Dade County has the highest homeless rate in the State of Florida. It ranks first in ‘families living in poverty’ among 25 major US cities (JLM, n.d.). Poverty and high rate of rentals have been considered the two main causes of homelessness. As much as 83% of people experience homelessness for a short period and usually require assistance in finding housing or rent subsidy. About 17% of the people in Miami-Dade are homeless for longer periods and require permanent supportive housing. The total number of homeless persons on the street in January 2006 was 4709 (Camillus.org). Fluctuations in the homeless count can occur depending upon the weather, time of the year and the methodology.

Florida accounts f...
6 Pages (1500 words) Essay

Effective Methods of Teaching Anatomy

Herein, comparisons will be made to highlight the differences in using anatomical models for study versus self-directed (usually textbook) learning. As well, the use of tutors as an advantage in the medical classroom will be discussed.

Some students are hands-on learners. For them, three-dimensional (3D) anatomical models are effective. “Exploratory tools enable users to investigate structures in ways not possible in the real world” (Implementing, para. 3). These 3D models can represent just about any part of the human body. Models are available of small structures, like the head, or of the entire human skeleton. Models of the entire human body can also be purchased. Some of them even have removable parts so...
6 Pages (1500 words) Report

Evaluation of the Course: Teaching and Learning Strategies

I will begin my evaluation with the objectives of the course, discuss a theory that is relevant to learning styles to see how it fits with the course and then provide my conclusions about how this course meets the objectives of the course.

 I am assuming that the Teaching and Learning Strategies class was created for students at the college level who were going into some form of teaching or training.

To evaluate this course it is a good idea to start from the beginning and look at the objectives. As I was looking for references in this process, I found a website that had tips for designing instruction that I felt would offer me a structure to work within. According to "Instructional Design," the instruct...
7 Pages (1750 words) Term Paper

Children and Young People's Reflections on an Education

The reforms have to be brought from the top side of a nation, whereby the government needs to take bold steps to promote it no matter how hard it is on their budgets. Similarly, child development is a very significant aspect in the times of today. There is immense importance which is given to this subject. (Nespor, 1997) The basis is backed up with sufficient data and research which goes a long in establishing the fact that child development indeed owes a lot of attributes on the part of the people who are related to the child – the parents and/or its guardians. The aspects of love and training at the same time holds true for their balance bringing up the regime and this without a shadow of a doubt is a significant thing to...
6 Pages (1500 words) Assignment

The Constructivist Approach to Teaching Science in the Primary Classroom

When students learn science, they construct meanings and develop understandings in a social context, state Duit & Treagust (1998: 4). Classroom verbal discourse in the form of teacher talk and teacher-student interactions form the basis for most of this meaning-making. Because teacher questions are a frequent component of classroom talk, they play an important role in determining the nature of discourse during science instruction. The cognitive processes that students engage in, as they undertake the process of constructing scientific knowledge, to a large extent depend on the kinds of questions that teachers ask and their way of asking the questions.

Chin (2007: 816) conducted a study to investigate questioning-bas...
7 Pages (1750 words) Case Study

Teaching Language and Communication Skills

“Language occurs through an interaction among genes (which hold innate tendencies to communicate and be sociable), environment, and the child’s own thinking abilities” (Genishi, 2006). But just how does this happen? How do children learn to use sounds to communicate and then to place those sounds in the correct order to make themselves understood? While some of this behavior can be attributed to the imitation of the caregivers, there remain aspects to the development of language and communication that cannot be so easily explained. To provide a more complete understanding of how language and communication develop in the young child, it is necessary to understand not only the primary terms that are applied, but al...
12 Pages (3000 words) Case Study

The Law on Physical Punishment of Children Fails to give Sufficient Respect to Childrens Rights

Under the English criminal law, several past and current legislations were made in order to protect the children from corporal punishment or becoming a victim of physical abuse. Despite our effort to prevent parents from using physical force in disciplining their children, the British Government remains unconvinced that the law which protects the children from physical punishment is sufficient (Keating, 2008). Physical punishment such as ‘smacking’, ‘slapping’, ‘kicking’, or ‘spanking’ is referring to the act of causing a degree of pain or discomfort to the child. (Niland, 2009, p. 6) With regard to the legal issues behind child protection against physical abuse, this study aims to d...
6 Pages (1500 words) Coursework

Malnutrition: A Long Standing Problem among Children

Poverty majorly affects young children and it makes infants very prone to being malnourished. In Africa the situation is probably the worst when compared with any other continent, poverty has completely overshadowed the development of the people there and several young children die because of malnourishment. People who cannot afford even one square meal a day are the ones who are predominantly affected by malnourishment.

 Nutrition is pivotal for growth and progression of normal life and also a disease-free life. It is imperative for everybody and much more important in the case of children and infants because they are in their maximum growth stage. Malnutrition at this stage can have serious repercussions for the...
10 Pages (2500 words) Coursework

Evaluation of Children with Visual Impairment between Ages 4-12

A visually impaired child may suffer from incomplete sight, reduced vision, total blindness as well as legal sightlessness (Kelley and Gale p 45). It is a condition that may become severe in a child, thereby affecting its growth and development. The impact is usually dependent on the kind of loss, age at which it occurs, as well as the general body functioning of the child. The normal interest that is usually evident amongst children on seeing attractive items in their surroundings lacks in a visually impaired child. This may interfere with the child’s learning capabilities unless he/she is assisted to learn. The development of social behavior in children usually depends on the ability to see parents or those in charge of ca...
6 Pages (1500 words) Coursework

Assessments of Homeschooled Children

The decentralized form of the homeschooling populace limits the ability of researchers to outline conclusions on the precise effect of homeschooling on diverse outcome measures like an academic achievement (Ray). Nevertheless, assessments of homeschooled children have claimed that these students do well in that educational environment. In addition, a survey of homeschooled adults implies that homeschooling ushers in positive outcomes such as improved college enrollment and attendance.
Historically, homeschooling has been a key means for parents to offer education to their children. Most of the Founding Fathers of America went through this form of education, including Thomas Jefferson and George Washington (Coulson 120). With...
11 Pages (2750 words) Case Study
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Teaching children with dyslexia for FREE!

Contact Us