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Teaching Education - Essay Example

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Teaching the correct ideologies to students is one which is traditionally based on fulfilling the curriculum and the requirements which come from the administrative lists within schools. …
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Teaching Education
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Download file to see previous pages The issue of teaching then confronts the specialized needs of children and the approaches to learning. More important, are confrontations with the individual child and the way in which they are engaged in the classroom according to personal needs and desires. Looking at various aspects of the complexity of teaching then offers different insight into the methods and approaches which are taken to children in the classroom. The specific challenge of teaching today is based on how to engage students in the classroom and what this means with meeting traditional requirements and offering new solutions to learning the necessary knowledge of different topics. An issue which is engaged with learning and teaching in the classroom is based on engaging the minds of students and how this can be done. According to Barry Schwartz, there isn’t the ability to create a sense of engagement among students, specifically because the occupation of each student’s mind. The reality is that most students are looking at life choices and daily choices on a continuous basis. These come from the necessary consumption that is within society as well as alternatives which are approached in terms of the life questions that consume minds. The idea of consumption of questions and choices is one which comes from the ideologies of belonging to an area that is engaged in choices and the freedom to decide among a variety of things. The challenge to teachers then becomes based on creating the right approach to reach students while understanding that the ideologies of choice and consumption are continuously a part of the mindset of children and their decision to engage in specific activities (Schwartz, 2005). The concept of choice among students and the changing engagement which this leads to is one which is furthered with the new tools and technology that is in the classroom. For teachers, this poses both new challenges and opportunities for teaching. This comes from the same choices and the stimulations that students are surrounded by in the environment that is altering the way in which students learn and the teaching which is available to students. The challenge comes with the engagement in the classroom and the way in which technology often detracts from the ability to create the right atmosphere with teaching. However, other experiments show a different outcome, where technology works as a tool in creating links with children. According to Nicholas Negroponte, an experiment with offering 1 laptop per child created stimulation in the learning where fewer kids were dropping out and more students were becoming engaged with the material that was being learned. The question was then based on the idea of certain choices and technologies that led to deferment from materials, while others used the same materials to create even more engagement to the learning process and to offer exploration with the topics learned (Negroponte, 2006). The challenges and opportunities that are presented with the learning with children are defined specifically by the way in which teaching needs to be approached in terms of individual needs and cultural affiliations. Teachers are now responsible for looking at the conditions which students are under and the defining points that are associated with this. The affiliations are combined with looking at the pragmatics of teaching, specifically which applies to how a teacher can effectively grab the attention of children and students in a changing world and with different tools that are now available. While the historical and traditional dynamics of teaching are still presented in the classroom, this limits what is ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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