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Scientific Revolution Burke vs Merchant - Essay Example

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The paper "Scientific Revolution – Burke vs Merchant" states that Merchant believed that the scientific revolution was in fact the death of nature because scientists so deeply infiltrated with the nature of life that they became a cause of death of the actual nature of life. …
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Scientific Revolution Burke vs Merchant
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James Burkes described scientific revolution as an unstoppable process of change. He explained it not only as a change in technology but a change in the overall behavior of society. He also believed that the scientific revolution is a process of learning laws of nature to estimate it and forecast it accurately. He thinks that the universe changes according to the beliefs, as we are only able to see it this way because we want to see it this way so far. Precisely, the rules define the structure and the outcome, and hence it becomes a supposed reality.
The scientific revolution was nothing but acceptance of technology from East that West declined to accept in the first instance. The reason for this decline was nothing but protest form people putting at disadvantage from the coming technology. But the change came by itself, only by the interaction of one factor with another.
Merchant described the scientific revolution as a change in scientist’s perspective to explore nature and attempt to use it for the betterment of society. Merchant also described the scientific revolution as the desire to dominate nature by scientists and put an end to the image of Nature as a loving caregiver. Read More
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