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Reflection paper: Family therapy - Essay Example

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Reflection paper: Family therapy Name: Institution: Date: Reflection paper: Family therapy The readings discussed in this paper, dig deeper into the structure of the family and how its members relate with respect to family therapy. A family is defined as a group of related persons, either by blood or residency…
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Download file to see previous pages However, beyond this internal linkage described within the family, the theoretical construct upon which the chapters are premised, recognizes that each family has a link to the larger societal systems and hence the interplay between the family structure and the social systems within the larger community are crucial to the functional success of the family. According to the authors, healthy family systems are defined as those that have commitment towards each other and hence dedicate time, and energy towards the benefit of each other. Additionally, a key component of a healthy family is appreciation for each other. More often than not, family members need to appreciate each other. This aspect is very crucial even to the modern day therapists who acknowledge that once appreciation lacks, the family is headed for a substantial communication breakdown and hence family problems. Additionally, another key element of any healthy family is their willingness to spend time together. It is advisable that families share as much time as possible (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008). This often entails having as many common points as possible. While issues like culture as well as religion may at time act as point of diversity within a family unit, there is an undisputable need to create a common ground, or rather a compromise that will help the members be together. This must not however, be misrepresented as a compulsion for family members to give up their ideals in order to suit other family members. Rather it implies the need for family members to be able to accommodate each other’s views. Communication is no doubt vital and needs not be ignored. In many instances, families have broken down due to communication problems. Family therapists have often found themselves dealing with persons who did not at any time express their sources of frustration to their partners and eventually this resulted into communication breakdown. Often, when communication is lacking, assumptions take control and sadly, such assumptions can be lethal to any family unit. The authors trace the roots of family therapy to four key areas. As suggested by the book, scholars trace these roots to the end of World War II (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008). The key areas include the child guidance movement, marriage counseling, group therapy, as well as family studies of schizophrenia (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008). Tracing back to these elements is more like looking at various elements of the family unit and bringing them into a single scope. While there is concern for every family as well as the society to have the children experience positive growth, this is more likely to happen, only if, the family unit, mostly a result of marriage remains unified and stable. This emphasizes the need marriage counseling as component of family therapy. The notion of group therapy comes up as means of bringing the whole family together in addressing the challenges within the unit (Goldenberg & Goldenberg, 2008). In addition, is the reality that mood changes of one family member translates to affect the whole family and hence its functional success. Basically, the book, and more especially the chapters covered address the elements which constitute a given family. It builds on the tenets that help the family relate as a family rather than as individual ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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