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Using Falsification in Philosophy - Assignment Example

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 This essay focuses on falsifiability which is seen as the belief that for a given hypothesis to be approved, it must be inherently rejected before it is scientifically accepted as a scientific theory or hypothesis. For example, an experiment has to be falsified for it to be accepted as true. …
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Using Falsification in Philosophy
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Download file to see previous pages Therefore, it appears that as one theory gets falsified, another one evolves as a replacement and act as an explanation for the new observation. A major theme that lies behind science is that any scientific hypothesis and its experiments are inherently falsifiable. Despite falsifiability not being accepted universally, it is seen as the foundation of the majority of scientific experiments. This means that in as much as many scholars may doubt it, it is a major block in the acceptability of any scientific projects. An experiment has to be falsified for it to be accepted as true.  
Karl Popper, one f the earlier philosophers tried to solve the problem of induction by using falsification. According to Popper, empirical sciences can be characterized by a fact that they make use of inductive methods. This means that the logic of scientific discoveries would be identical with inductive logic. He also states that the question of whether inductive inferences are justified or under what conditions is referred to as the problem of induction. Thus, this problem of induction, he writes can be formulated as the question of how one can establish the truth of universal statements that are based on experiences. This was because many people believed the truth of any of the universal statements “known by experience” and yet it was clear that an account of an experiment or an observation could in the first place have been only a singular statement and not universal one (Popper, 426-427). This was meant to imply that if only a single individual gave an account, the probability of it being accepted was null until other people did the same experiment and gave their statement.   ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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