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The impacts of 9/11 on United Statess - Essay Example

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One of the most pronounced of these reasons is the fact that there was more support for the national security policies that the government was coming up with. This support extends even to the…
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The impacts of 9/11 on United Statess
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The impacts of 9/11 on United s Affiliation: What are the impacts of 9/11on United States’ politics?
The September 11th terrorist attack brought about several political impacts in US. One of the most pronounced of these reasons is the fact that there was more support for the national security policies that the government was coming up with. This support extends even to the amount of funds allocated to the national security which was previously a bone of contention. The other was the unity the citizens and the government engulfed themselves in. This unity has made it possible for the improvement in development economic and otherwise as the people work together with the politicians and the government in general. All these however have also their negative aspects as the more conservative people lash the government over the spending in defense and national security at the expense of social amenities.
2. Review the video on different food consumption in different part of the world. Make sure you leave your comments.
It is evident that the rate of food consumption has increased as a result of the increase in population in different parts of the world and especially in the third world countries. This is despite the fact that with climatical changes and global warming issues, food production has reduced and continues to do so. The other thing evident is the fact that people are shifting to concentrate more on cash crop farming in large scale leaving the food production low. The increased food consumption has led to people in parts of the world going hungry as they lack enough food and the governments lack enough food reserves to feed their ever growing population and dwindling food amount. Read More
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