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Philosophy of Education - Essay Example

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It is a ubiquitous endeavor which every man in one way or another has experienced and will continue to experience. Each one has his own philosophy of education. For Plato, his philosophy of education is based on…
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Philosophy of Education
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Philosophy of Education Philosophy of Education Education is one of the most important activities in this world.It is a ubiquitous endeavor which every man in one way or another has experienced and will continue to experience. Each one has his own philosophy of education. For Plato, his philosophy of education is based on the four moral principles of wisdom, virtue, service and leadership (Brennen, 1999). Aristotle on the other hand, believes that education should be concerned with the golden mean, the possible and the becoming (Brennen, 1999). For the Montessori Method, it is “educating and raising children to develop their fullest potential” (Michael Olaf Montessori, 2012). Developing a student’s mental, physical, moral and spiritual aspects is Ellen White’s philosophy of education. These are just some of the philosophies which have influenced one in formulating one’s own philosophy of education.
One’s philosophy of education focuses on the end of ignorance among men. Like Plato, one is convinced that education “leads man out of the cave into the world of light” (Brennen, 1999). Education must however be flexible in that its content should be adapted according to the needs of men. One deems it important that education be child-centered as opposed to being content-centered (Brennen, 1999). The Montessori approach to education is a method which one will certainly adapt in one’s philosophy of education. According to Montessori, “the secret of good teaching is to regard the childs intelligence as a fertile field in which seeds may be sown, to grow under the heat of flaming imagination” (1989). Montessori goes on further to say that teaching should encourage creativity and imagination. One believes that this should be one of the focal points of education especially among the young children. Education should be an enriching experience for the student. It is not enough that men are bombarded with a myriad of information, what is essential is whether these information are relevant to them and will be of use to them in the future. To a larger extent, education should be viewed as something which is pertinent to society’s development and that which will eventually help men’s lives prosper and become more fruitful.
It is one’s belief that education must not only impart knowledge and make sponges out of men, who simply absorbs everything the educator teaches them. Its fundamental aim should be to make man critical thinkers, be effective decision makers and ultimately achieve whatever goals they want to pursue in life.
One believes that teachers play a major role in the education of an individual. Aside from the parents, teachers are one of the first people who mold the young and innocent minds of children. As such, teachers must be passionate about their job of educating the youth. They should possess more than an academic relationship with their students. Rather, they should be a good role model, a leader and an inspiration to his students. Because after all, education is not just learning and obtaining a degree, it is discovering and understanding life’s past, present and future experiences.
Being an educator is not an easy task. It requires a lot of dedication and hard work. A teacher’s role in education goes beyond being a mere instructor. A teacher is an adviser, a confidant, a classroom manager and a friend. With these roles in mind, one is able to clearly define what one’s philosophy of education should be.
References
Brennen, A. M. (1999, August). Philosophy of education. Retrieved February 27, 2012, from soencouragement.org: http://www.soencouragement.org/Essays%20on%20Education%20and%20Educational%20Philosophy.pdf
Michael Olaf Montessori. (2012, February 21). The Montessori Method. Retrieved February 27, 2012, from michaelolaf.net : http://www.michaelolaf.net/
Montessori, M. (1989). To educate the human potential. Oxford, England: Clio Press. Read More
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