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Philosophy of Science - Coursework Example

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In conformation to Lewis-Beck, Bryman and Liao (2004), paradigm refers to a model that is can be applicable, as a framework or example for doing things. …
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Philosophy of Science Philosophy of Science In conformation to Lewis-Beck, Bryman and Liao (2004), paradigm refers to a model that is can be applicable, as a framework or example for doing things. Entomology, on the other hand, refers to a field of reasoning that entails the likelihood, nature, sources and bounds of human understanding. Ontology however is concerned with the study of the key way of life (Lewis-Beck, Bryman and Liao, 2004). Slightly different from ontology, epistemology largely concerns how human can have a learning of reality.
According to Creswell, (2013) paradigm refers to learning cases from which a researcher starts a venture with certain speculations on how and what they will learn in the inquiry process. These research methods include philosophical assumptions such as ontology, epistemology, and philosophical assumptions. While ontology is the claim about what knowledge is, epistemology refers to how a researcher recognizes the knowledge (Creswell, 2013). Additionally, how investigators write the facts is referred to as rhetoric while the study procedure is the methodology.
Dr. Patton explains epistemology as the investigation of learning taking a deep insight on how we distinguish what we know. The meaning of this is how human differentiate between what they know and what they do not know. On the other hand, ontology refers to the address of the issue that someone is examining, what makes up the world. Philosophy of science refers to the study of theoretical fundamentals of scientific investigation. It is important for a researcher to be familiar with the philosophy of science to study and offer disapprovals for scientific ideas.
Reynolds (1971) suggests that application of new paradigm occasionally describes situations that previous models could not clarify. He outlines some of the characteristics of paradigm as; a fresh conceptualization may explain formerly clarified events, and a new perception may propose fresh investigative questions.
References
Creswell, J. W. (2013). Research design: Qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods approaches. Thousand Oaks: Sage publications.
Lewis-Beck, M. S., Bryman, A., & Liao, T. F. (2004). The Sage Encyclopedia of social science research methods. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
Reynolds, P. D. (1971). A primer in theory construction. London: Macmillan Publishing Company.
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