Free

Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5 - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The courts allowed fingerprinting evidence to be used in the courts. For most of the twentieth century, fingerprinting remained one of the standard methods of criminal identification. At the turn of the century,…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.9% of users find it useful
Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5"

Brain Fingerprinting Criteria from Daubert Introduction America started using the brain fingerprinting technology in 1911. The courts allowed fingerprinting evidence to be used in the courts. For most of the twentieth century, fingerprinting remained one of the standard methods of criminal identification. At the turn of the century, some authorities predicted that that in the next few decades, its use will be overtaken by DNA identification (Hensen, 2006).
Fingerprinting has faced several challenges in courts. In particular, the 1993 Supreme Court decision of Daubert v Merrel Dow, judges were expected to take a more active role in determining what scientific evidence is admissible in court. According to Daubert guidelines, new questions would be answered before fingerprints could be entered into evidence. Due to this decision, the court had to introduce five criteria that had to be achieved before evidence could be considered scientific. The first question that must be answered concerns peer review, and sound methodology. The second question involves a known error rate, the third involves testable hypothesis, fourth involves application outside of legal proceedings, and fifth question involves general acceptance (Hensen, 2006).
Brain fingerprinting continues to face challenges regarding twins. Twins have the same DNA, but different fingerprints. In addition, the main challenge to brain fingerprinting lies in the fact that there is a lack of universal standards for comparing fingerprints. Several mismatches of partial fingerprints have been encountered (Hensen, 2006).
Potential Rate of Error
This criterion involves using a particular scientific technique. In other words, it shows the likelihood of being wrong in the case whereby the scientist has asserted that alleged crime has a particular effect. The known potential error should be small, about 1-5 percent (Roth, 2010).
General Acceptance
This criterion measures the extent at which the actions of the scientist produce results that are scientifically knowledgeable. Appropriate hypothesis testing techniques must be used on questions of interest to the scientific community. The general hypotheses testing techniques must be accepted after undergoing scrutiny by the scientific community (Roth, 2010).
Peer Review and Publication
The theory must be peer reviewed before publication. The scientist’s peers must scrutinize the work before being published. This is the only ways objectivity of the fingerprinting can be achieved. After publication, the work is then expected to undergo further review by other experts (Roth, 2010).
Hypothesis Testing
The hypothesis testing method should determine whether the research involved scientific methods or involved no-scientific methods. Admissibility must be based on scientific method of testing hypotheses. Hypothesis testing involves coming up with some propositions on observable events from credible scientific principles (Roth, 2010).
Conclusion
The Daubert standard requires that all scientific evidence, such as psychological assessment results, be reliable, based on four criteria. The first area addressed is whether the scientific technique used to obtain the evidence is helpful and can be tested. Second, the scientific technique is evaluated to determine if it has been subjected to peer review and publications. The error rate and standardization of the technique is considered as the third criterion. Finally, the overall acceptance of the technique by the scientific community is factored into the decision for admissibility.
References
Hensen, M (2006), Clinician’s Handbook of Adult Behavioral Assessment, Gulf Professional Publishing.
Roth, M (2010), Crime and Punishment: A History of the Criminal Justice System, New York: Cengage Learning. Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1602241-brain-fingerprinting-302-wk5
(Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words)
https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1602241-brain-fingerprinting-302-wk5.
“Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1602241-brain-fingerprinting-302-wk5.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5

DNA Fingerprinting

...DNA Fingerprinting Introduction DNA as we all know is the basic building structure of every living thing present on earth. It has been scientifically proved that it is the DNA that gives us our characters, both phenotypic and genotypic. If the there is some sort of problem i.e. mutation in the DNA, it would lead to altered characters or even lead to abnormalities (Burke 1991). The DNA sequence of every individual is specific and is generally passed on from parents to their offspring. The basic structure of a DNA consists of four Nucleotide bases i.e. Adenine, Thymine, Guanine and Cytosine. These four bases pair with each other in a unique manner i.e. Adenine-Thymine and Guanine-Cytosine to form the unique DNA structure...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Public Relations

3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Digital fingerprinting

...Digital fingerprinting   Contents page Thesis approval page Acknowledgments Table of contents List of tables List of illustrations (charts, graphs, figures) Text (chapters of the manuscript) Endnotes Appendices References TITLE The Use of Digital Fingerprinting in Crime Control – Analyzing two techniques A RESEARCH PROJECT SUBMITTED TO XXXX UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF FORENSIC SCIENCES MAY 2009 By Hector Sanchez Masters Thesis Committee: , Chairperson , Supervisor , Supervisor MASTERS THESIS APPROVAL FORMS We certify that we have read the project of ………….. entitled Instructions for the Preparation of the...
14 Pages(3500 words)Essay

Digital fingerprinting

...Digital fingerprinting Contents page Thesis approval page Acknowledgments Abstract Table of contents List of tables List of illustrations (charts, graphs, figures) Text (chapters of the manuscript) Endnotes Appendices References TITLE The Use of Digital Fingerprinting in Crime Control - Analyzing two techniques A RESEARCH PROJECT SUBMITTED TO XXXX UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF FORENSIC SCIENCES MAY 2009 By Hector Sanchez Masters Thesis Committee: , Chairperson , Supervisor ,...
20 Pages(5000 words)Essay

Wk5(22)

...Wk5 (22) Disc Patrick has several challenges that may be helped by a person-centered approach. The presenting problem could be Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and/or survivor guilt. He is drinking a lot and it seems he may be attempting to deal with his feelings in that way. In working with him, it would be important to help him find meaning in his current life. IT seems that he could be searching for self-actualization in a way because he seems lost in his memories of 9/11. A weakness in using this method is that he may not have a trust in himself, an openness to experience or a willingness to continue growing (Corey, 2005, p. 168) until he can come to terms with what happened. One indication for this weakness is...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

FINGERPRINTING

...FINGERPRINTING The concept of whether or not the study of fingerprint identification is a science has caused long, drawn-out pre-trial hearings.Although the science of fingerprint identification has been legally challenged, it has won every single one of those challenges. It has been proven after numerous Daubert hearings that the reliability of fingerprints as scientific evidence has succeeded. The methodology has met the requirements of the Daubert/Kuhmo standards. With approximately 100 years of successful use in criminal trials the reliability of fingerprint comparison and identification has been established. Statistical analysis in science is a tool...
8 Pages(2000 words)Research Paper

Cont-wk5

...ContWK 5 Learning and motivation are key to the issue of the achievement gap. Studies have been done to show that those who are motivated tolearn are more able to learn. As an example, Atkinson (1964 as cited in Feist and Rosenberg, 2010) suggests that there are three things that are involved in achievement motivation that anyone learning anything should have: the motivation to succeed a task, the expectation that they will achieve that task and an incentive that makes the success worthwhile. As an example, an athlete who wants to be a long distance runner must prepare themselves through training, but if they do not have the motivation to succeed or expect to succeed they probably will not do as well as someone who does have... 5 Learning...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

ECN 302

...ECN 302 Simple Keynesian Model The article begins with reflection of how former President Richard Nixon. On the 1970s, citing the despair epoch belief that a government controlled economy, achieves better results than one, which is a free market. He famously declared that all American are Keynesians. The article further explains that after 40 years, the former president’s remarks are still significant. The article reports that a report survey carried out by the Rasmussen indicated that it only 27% of the entire American populations believe in the stimulation of the economy by the government. Over half of the Americans have a contrary view and claim that all the government intervention achieves is causing more damage...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

Fingerprinting Paper

...Fingerprinting Paper Fingerprinting Paper Question Q1. Are there any current or potential alternatives to traditional fingerprintingthat would better aid in solving crimes? In the brief history of biological identification of persons, fingerprinting has been the traditional classic of personal identification. Nevertheless, fingerprinting thrived in an analogue world where there was very little else to resort to, which had any technological advantage. In the era of digital technology and PINs (Personal International Identification numbers), there are extensive possibilities that would either complement or replace the fingerprint (Chandos & Piosenka, 1991;...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

Project Managment - Team work Evaluation

1 Pages(250 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Brain Fingerprinting 302 WK5 for FREE!

Contact Us