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Introduction to European Studies - Essay Example

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Europe has been considered as the cradle of modern civilization for long. The Hellenic perception of life controlled the basic concept of Europe since the age of early Greek thinkers and philosophers like Socrates, Plato, Aristophanes and Herodotus to name a few…
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But it should be remembered that the idea of Europe, as we know it today, was still in its infancy dealing in ideologies and fundamentals that are not much different from the rest of the known and civilized world. As late as the beginning of the 1700 AD there were still the practice of feudalism in one form or another, there were states that used bonded labours and encouraged slavery, woman rights were not known and structural academic movements were still at bay. This society needed a thrust to start off. And that thrust was inspired from a political movement in England.
The Act of Union was passed in British Council whereby four states, England, Ireland, Scotland and Welsh came together to form a political union know as United Kingdom of Great Britain. Subsequent Act of Union was passed in 1707 and 1800 and this was the point of a growing concept which ultimately is on its way towards a unified European Union in the 21st Century. The perception of a common fiscal policy has been granted by most of the states of Europe and Union of European could be within striking distance. However, this modern concept of unification of states is a step towards a better and mutually prosperous situation but at the same time it should be kept in mind the development of Europe as a concept or idea started with other variables too. (Mukherjee, 81)
The concept of Europe as a unified cultural sect started along the path of the 1700s and the basic idea of Europe is that unified perception of thought process bounded by cultural, social, religious and political homogeneousness. There are other variables to develop this homogeneousness of states in Europe whereby the idea could be put forward.
Religion
One such variable is the growth of Christianity as a binding force. It is obvious that religion played an enormous part as the determining factor of conceptualising the unified idea of Europe. The Eight Crusades were just a beginning of this bonding. Though Christianity has changed face along with time and space and at present there are three major distributaries of the religion viz. Roman Catholic, Protestant and Greek Orthodox it cannot be denied that Christ as a Prophet, despite being Semitic by anthropological diversity, it should be noted and the fact that should indulged in this conception, influenced all the tribes of Europe be it Nordic, Alpine or Caucasian. Although, no one can ignore that during the inquisition period this religion did enough to set back the clock for Europe, at least scientifically. But this same inquisition period can be put forward to ensure the bondage that that spread across Europe with the substantial feel of brotherhood.

Political
Apart from the Act of Union in Great Britain there came another exemplary act that forced all Europe to reconsider their usual concept of life and perception of politics all at the same time all over Europe. This was the French revolution of the late 18th Century. On 20 September 1792 the National Convention abolished the monarchy and declared France a republic. Due to the emergency of war the National Convention created the Committee of Public Safety, controlled by the Jacobin Robespierre, to act as the country's executive. Under ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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