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Urban - Essay Example

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According to my point of view, an urban area is characterized by dense human settlements and infrastructure they include cities, towns, and shopping centers and to some extent village settlements. On the other hand, cities are a picture of sophistication modernization and…
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According to my point of view, an urban area is characterized by dense human settlements and infrastructure they include cities, towns, and shopping centers and to some extent village settlements. On the other hand, cities are a picture of sophistication modernization and urbanity ideally. Indeed, unsophisticated people are referred to as provincial, meaning, not from the cities, while urban means sophistication.
Furthermore, cities are melting points of culture, and many of them are cosmopolitan areas with a populace consisting of cross-cultural groups living together, this is especially in large cities such as New York. Many cities are founded based on industrialization and/or trade since with many industries there for labor arises, leading to people migrating to towns; these people will require housing education and medical services. This leads to centralization of services this bringing them close to employees, and their families. This spawns a range of business to service the needs of the inhabitants, because of the industries, there is also the demand for non-skilled labor, and the workers are often not well educated and poorly paid. As a result, they cannot afford the expensive housing and end up living in informal settlements or slums and shantytowns especially in third world countries.
However, urban areas are centers of administrative government with their central location allowing them to be accessed by people from anywhere. They are also centers of entertainment with many fun spots such as discos, casinos and nightclubs being located in urban area. However, cities also create a breeding ground for a plethora of crimes mostly because of competition for limited resources these include; muggings and robbery, and self-destructive activities such as drug use and other unhealthy recreational activities as people try to escape their problems in a place far away from their homes. Read More
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