Nobody downloaded yet

Philosophy and theory of architecture - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Philosophy and the theory of architecture The philosophical underpinnings of Buddhist architecture and the role of the Baims Si in the development of Buddhist architectural thought in China Introduction This paper examines some of the important ideas, motives and devices behind Buddhist architecture…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.6% of users find it useful
Philosophy and theory of architecture
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Philosophy and theory of architecture"

Download file to see previous pages In so doing, it discusses the roots of this phenomenon, and surveys the different phases it has been and is going through and its physical spread and influence as well. That is, it takes a tour through both changes over time as well as spatially. The focus is mainly on the architecture of Buddhist temples, particularly those found in China. However, as the reader will come to know, if not known already, in Buddhism there is a variety of buildings that are considered as religious or spiritual spaces besides temples. A case study is made of the Baima Si, which is the White Horse Temple in the Henan province of China. This temple (Si) was chosen for its historical significance, as will be explained later, as well as the fact that it represents a unique amalgamation of architectural styles. It also functioned as a model for other such buildings and thereby played a pivotal role in moulding a special wave of thinking on architecture, which makes it deserve serious attention. For contrastive purposes, important comparisons are also drawn with architectural features belonging to Buddhist temples elsewhere in the world, especially in other Far Eastern countries that are heartlands of Buddhism. In addition, some comparisons are also highlighted between Buddhist architecture and what is found in other religious architectural expressions, especially of Christian, Hindu and Islamic origin. After the distinguishing and other special features are identified for Chinese Buddhist temples, an attempt is then made to explain these and the philosophy behind them. Buddhist architecture In Buddhism, although the temple is the main place for spiritual practices, there are also other spiritual spaces. These are the pagodas, which are towers like broader based minarets, stupas, which are dome shaped monuments, and grottos, which are caves used for specific spiritual practices within a more isolated environment. They are all holy and made to be serene and tranquil. The temples function more as monasteries for collective practices. As far as Chinese temples are concerned, Buddhist philosophy has been described as the greatest impetus behind religious art and architecture in China (Phuoc, 2010). Initially, Buddhism was practised in ordinary settings in China, such as people’s houses, but as demand grew, then special buildings were constructed. These buildings proved to be far more interesting than the Confucian and Taoist places and rich in architectural detail reflecting an equally richer philosophy. Hindu and Islamic philosophies of architecture share some commonality with Buddhist architecture. The Hindu influence is mostly evident in the early temples. Thus, there is a direct connection with Hindu architecture as they gave roots to Buddhist architecture. Connections with other religions are more indirect. A prominent style of Christian architecture was Gothic architecture during the medieval period. This was related with scholastic philosophy (Radding & Clark, 1994) in which there was an attempt to develop a comprehensive and integrated solution for various tasks including the construction of churches. An interesting parallel is drawn between the ideas of St. Thomas Aquinas who was one of these aforementioned philosophers and Buddhist architecture in that he saw churches as symbolising heaven on earth. This is similar in some ways to the Buddhist concept of heaven but with some fundamental differences. Whereas only one heaven is envisaged in Christianity ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Philosophy and theory of architecture Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3500 words - 1”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1412075-philosophy-and-theory-of-architecture
(Philosophy and Theory of Architecture Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3500 Words - 1)
https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1412075-philosophy-and-theory-of-architecture.
“Philosophy and Theory of Architecture Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3500 Words - 1”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/environmental-studies/1412075-philosophy-and-theory-of-architecture.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Philosophy and theory of architecture

Philosophy and theory of architecture

...? Philosophy and the Theory of Architecture Architecture, its underlying philosophies and a look at Regent’s Park Mosque Architecture is underpinned by philosophical thinking. Different periods in history have reflected different ways of thinking, which are briefly explored, especially the architecture of religious buildings. For example, the Gothics put into practice scholastic philosophy, and there was a movement for the restoration of historic buildings after the French revolution. Some architectural practices such as correctional architecture have a more direct...
14 Pages(3500 words)Essay

Otto Wagner modern theory of architecture

.... According to his theory this style has a rational foundation. His philosophy was used in Art Nouveau, the first architectural style independent of traditional antiquity in Europe that came after Gothic style. He aspired to make a new architecture based on Descartes’ philosophy. This he was to implement only in reasonable conclusions based on them. Among his arguments was “A door ought to be made for going into a building or going out of it and the width of such a door ought to be accommodated the number of persons who have occasion to go in and out. That however, a dense crowd maybe the persons are always less than seven feet in height. To make a door...
5 Pages(1250 words)Book Report/Review

Philosophy - Moral Theory

...? Philosophy- Moral Theory Introduction Theories have been developed with time with an aim of expressing longtime thoughts and admiration of a phenomenon in order to convince society or a certain setting on the importance and relevance of the subject matter. Majority of theories are presented through generalized abstracts illustrating the theorist’s conclusion or view over particular phenomenon and/or estimated/ forecasted strategies of achieving and understanding the same phenomenon but on a broader perspective. In contextual and epistemological analysis, theories differ with hypotheses in that they provide explanatory framework for some observations which are a product of testing the hypotheses; designed to support or challenge... an...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Ethical Theory (Philosophy)

...?Running Head: Ethical Theory Ethical Theory [Institute’s ETHICAL THEORY Introduction For many centuries, ethics has enjoyed a significant importance in almost every sect of human existence in this world due to its strong influence on norms and values of the society. In addition, while ethics and ethical standards have remained important notions, they have always been a major part of debate along with religion regarding right and wrong in the society. Due to such significance, from time to time, philosophers and scholars have endeavored to offer their explanations and theories regarding what can be the authentic definition of ethics and the role that it can play in different sections of life (Everson, 1998). Unfortunately, despite... of the...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Architecture - Avant Garde Architectural Theory

..., setting away the superstructures. As of that instant, architectural philosophy has worn out its own purposes: its determined firmness on viewing its theories realized will turn out to be either a "springboard for going beyond backward conditions, or a troublesome disturbance." (Sartelli, 1969) Avant Garde The time period of 1960s was a thrilling time for architects and the American scenery still does have marks of it: "the belligerent monolith of Boston City Hall, the regimented grandiosity of Nelson Rockfeller's Albany Mall, and hundreds of damaged campuses, from Fredonia State to Yale." (Langdon, 2002) A Note On Modernism 1) An Era In Western Civilization: The word modernism can...
15 Pages(3750 words)Essay

Critical theory, philosophy

....’ In this chapter, Locke has described various theories that form a common pattern of thinking that progress from family to society. These are levels at which exposure is accounted for. Further in the section, Locke has described the means of thinking in the similarly titled chapter. (Locke, 2007) This contributes to the notion that one’s sense of expression comes from one’s understanding of thinking patterns at various levels. The job of philosophy is to define these patterns so as to ensure that there is a certain replication of the ideals connected with these patterns at each level. Writing is a form of expressing the outcome of this process. Therefore, philosophy is like the...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Philosophy (Theory of knowledge)

...by demonstrating points and hence influence others’ thoughts and actions. Reasoning to emphasize points is extensively applied in everyday living by all walks of life to support or contradict positions in unlimited subject matters like theories on evolution and creationism, science and religion, and others. Mastercraft 356 wrote that “Scientist Isaac Newton used inductive reasoning to question the existence of God while Scientist Galileo Galilei, in his belief on the separation of science and religion, pronounced that religious reasoning was wrong for use in matters of science.”2 Reason can therefore make strong leader if a person harness skills to demonstrate and assert points to...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

The Philosophy of Biobehavioural Theory

...The Philosophy of Biobehavioural Theory Theoreticians have for several years tried to explain the reasons and implementations behind our actions as people. Depending on the perspective from which a particular theoretician looks at an issue, different categorisation is given to the name of the theory. Biobehavioural theory is one theory that is commonly referred to when discussing issues pertaining to criminal conduct and behaviour of people. Biobehavioural theory is an embodiment of several perspectives of human behaviour including psychological and biological. To this end, Farlex (2011) explains that biobehavioural...
17 Pages(4250 words)Essay

Philosophy ethical theory

...to find ways of breaking habits that are bad in their character such as greed and rage. This are considered to be the vices that hinder the individual from turning out to be a good person. As much as this theory is the oldest type of theory ethical theory that exists in Western Philosophy, it has not been common in the studies that are taken in the contemporary times. The inaugural systematic description that was associated with virtue ethics came from Aristotle where he thinks that when people acquire habits that are good in terms of their character, they are in a better position to control their emotions and the manner in which they reason. This in the long run will...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Philosophy theory

...of Leibniz that as the perfect being God could not create the imperfect world. Group B - Absurd (Kierkegaard) The concept of absurd has a rather weighty importance in the work of Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard considers the theory of absurd in several of his works, but it occupies a special role in his work Fear and Trembling. Here, speaking from a position of criticism of Christianity, Kierkegaard considers the biblical story when Abraham was asked by God to sacrifice his son to Him. For Kierkegaard, this is an example of the absurdity of human existence, based on lack of freedom. Kierkegaard sees the faith of Abraham as a paradox as it is able to convert a murder into the sacred and charitable act. Kierkegaard, however,...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Philosophy and theory of architecture for FREE!

Contact Us