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Teaching and Education - Essay Example

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Education plays a very significant role in a person’s success in life. It is often viewed as the basic foundation which brings about economic wealth, social prosperity and political stability in a society. …
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Download file to see previous pages Even the government allocates a large portion of the national budget for the improvement of the educational system of the nation. Education mainly begins at home. Parents have an important role in educating their children too. They should participate more actively in their child’s early development and learning. A child does not only acquire knowledge from the teacher alone, their parents are their first and most influential teachers. Parents cannot just rely on the schools to teach all of life’s lessons to their children. Many of life’s lessons are learned outside the structured environment of the classroom. Parents have a role too in curriculum development. It is not the sole responsibility of the school and the teachers. I believe that parents should have a role in the development of the curriculum because they have an indirect interest and concern in it. At the content level however, curriculum development lies primarily to the state officials and local administrators. At the processing level of the curriculum, the facilitators, teachers and support staff take on the major roles. Parents and students play a key role at the process level because they must learn and apply the objectives through their own methods and styles. Parents can be more involved in goal setting, finding alternative learning opportunities and in the evaluation of the curriculum. Parents must however recognize and respect the roles of the other participants in the curriculum development such as the teachers. A teacher’s role is not confined to merely educating the students in various subjects. I view their role as more encompassing. Teachers should educate students so that they will be equipped with the needed knowledge, possess a noble character and be responsible individuals of the society. They should also educate students to develop a strong will power to acquire various skills necessary to fulfill their aspirations and the requirements of the nation. Teachers have a great impact on the students’ lives during their school years and even after. It is therefore essential that they guide them towards the right attitudes and help the students uncover their roles in society in the future. Teachers are agents of change too. They should have the ability to carry out new changes according to the requirements of the student and the society. Teachers are important factors for a modern, updated and advanced society because their knowledge and skills not only enhances the quality of education but it also serves as prerequisites for future research and innovation. It is the responsibility of teachers to adopt their teaching method to the fast pace of our society today. The role of teachers today has undergone a dramatic transformation. This transformation is due in part by the massive advancement in knowledge and information technology and a growing demand for better learning methods in schools. The teachers of today are more concerned with their relationships with the students, colleagues and community. They are rethinking the tools and techniques that they use, as well as the form and content of their curriculum. Teachers realize now that it is their responsibility to get to know each student as an individual in order to understand his unique needs, learning style, social and cultural background, interests, and abilities. Their jobs now include counseling students to assist them to unite their social, emotional and intellectual growth to make better decisions in their lives. This is a totally new form of instruction for teachers which is no longer geared at traditional classroom lectures, but rather a teaching style which challenges students to have a more active ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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