Globalisation: Transforming the Nation-State - Essay Example

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Globalisation is the subject of much debate worldwide. Its impact on the economic and social are significant and varied. This paper aims to point out the transformations that nation-states will undergo, and the causal factors that made these transformations in the nation-state happen…
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Globalisation: Transforming the Nation-State
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Download file to see previous pages Proponents of globalisation emphasize that its goal is to reduce poverty worldwide. They stress that in spite of the world's population increasing from 1.8 billion to 6.0 billion, and with the constant eruption of political and armed conflicts, the real average income of every living person today is five times more than it was at the beginning of the century.
Despite claims by advocates of globalisation, it cannot be denied that there are also vulnerabilities, which raise concern among both developed, and developing countries. If there is global reduction of poverty, it has also produced problems for its players. (Giddens 2001) stated that, "Globalisation is not an 'out there' phenomenon, as if some external forces are at work. September 11 showed that it's an 'in here' phenomenon". He explained that globalisation is not a product of external factors, but also occurs within nations. "With interdependence comes vulnerability, a shift in our institutions, our emotions, our anxiety", he stressed (Giddens 2001).
The International Forum on Globalization defines it as, "the present worldwide drive toward a globalise economic system dominated by supranational corporate trade and banking institutions that are not accountable to democratic processes or national governments."
Erasmus (1998) stated that the nation-state is the most "endangered species in the world" because of the pressures enacted by globalisation and virtualisation. These two forces are redrawing the borders of the nation-state, divesting it of its institutional power. He pointed out that the nation state has three sources of power: mind, money and muscle. The cross-border...
As the report declares proponents of globalisation emphasize that its goal is to reduce poverty worldwide. They stress that in spite of the world’s population increasing from 1.8 billion to 6.0 billion, and with the constant eruption of political and armed conflicts, the real average income of every living person today is five times more than it was at the beginning of the century.
This discussion stresses that despite claims by advocates of globalisation, it cannot be denied that there are also vulnerabilities, which raise concern among both developed, and developing countries. If there is global reduction of poverty, it has also produced problems for its players. The International Forum on Globalization defines it as, “the present worldwide drive toward a globalise economic system dominated by supranational corporate trade and banking institutions that are not accountable to democratic processes or national governments.” The nation-state is the most “endangered species in the world” because of the pressures enacted by globalisation and virtualisation. These two forces are redrawing the borders of the nation-state, divesting it of its institutional power. He pointed out that the nation state has three sources of power: mind, money and muscle. The cross-border capabilities of media and the Internet, according to Erasmus, is able to flow unhindered across geopolitical boundaries very much “like the air we breath.” ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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