Nobody downloaded yet

The Salem Witchcraft Trials - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Heyrman (2013) observes that the Witch Trials took place in Massachusetts, Salem, from 1691 to 1693. On a personal standpoint, the Salem Witch Trials aptly exemplify some of the darkest misfortunes that have…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER93% of users find it useful
The Salem Witchcraft Trials
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
"The Salem Witchcraft Trials"

Download file to see previous pages One of the ways in which the Salem Witch Trials influenced the interactions between religion and the US legal system is by strengthening the US legal and court system. According to Wilson (1994), “Because of the changes that followed the Salem Witch Trials, prosecution came to involve the subtraction of religious institutions from participating in legal processes, so that religious institutions do not act as the jury. Instead, the need to adduce evidence before the court of law as the basis upon which a court case is to be sustained and the verdict is to be issued was made inevitable.” Again the need to have a competent jury to preside over cases became more perceptible. Initially, judges who presided over the Salem Witch Trials were untrained.
Particularly, the idea above can be said to be true, given that during the Salem Witch Trials, a number of teenage girls leveled accusations of witchcraft against 200 people, without producing any evidence to validate their claims. Instead, the teenage girls only made unverifiable claims that they were attacked by ghosts or evil spirits. It is against this backdrop that the right to defend oneself, the right to free trial and the right to not have to present any form of incriminating testimony became necessary and can thus be traced back to the Salem Witch Trials. According to Smith (2012), “This is because, when the Massachusetts Colonial Governor, Sir William Phips saw the alarming hanging of 19 suspects and the crushing of 1 suspect to death and consequently disbanded the court presiding over the Salem Witch Trials, the need for a fairer judicial system became inevitable.”
Another way in which the trials became the spring board for an independent system (devoid of purely religious claims) is through the myriad of relentless protests that ensued. Smith (2012) contends that, “The protests followed the fact that even after the convention of the second court to preside over 23 other cases, spectral evidence ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“The Salem Witchcraft Trials Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words”, n.d.)
The Salem Witchcraft Trials Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1618764-the-salem-witchcraft-trials
(The Salem Witchcraft Trials Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words)
The Salem Witchcraft Trials Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words. https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1618764-the-salem-witchcraft-trials.
“The Salem Witchcraft Trials Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1618764-the-salem-witchcraft-trials.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Salem witch Trials - Puritanism and Witchcraft
...? Salem witch trials - Puritanism and Witchcraft Salem Witch Trials - Puritanism and Witchcraft The seventeenth century women were often questioned about their reliance because they were doubted to be practicing witchcraft which was condemned in the strict puritanical faith. Puritans strongly believed that both salvation and damnation were ordained by God and man had no role to play in deciding who would go to heaven and hell. But because the practicing religion was always shaky clergy and laity sought to learn about their future out of desperation, fear and hope. However the puritans equally feared the devil and its...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Salem Witch Trials
...?Salem Witch Trials Salem Witch Trials Causes During the 17th century the hysterical event of Salem Witch Trial occurred. On the surface, it may seem that these trials took place just because of accusations made by two young girls, but the main causes of Salem Witch Trials are quite doubtful in nature. Certain individuals believe that religious and political issues played a major role in causing the trials. The main reasons that caused the trials to take place are associated with the strange behaviors exhibited by Betty Parris and her cousin. These two...
3 Pages(750 words)Research Paper
Salem Witch Trials
... Salem Witch Trials Introduction During the period of 17th century, people residing in the region of New England were fearful of the existence of devil (Findling 259). As a result of this fear, several innocent individuals including children and women were accused of indulging in the act of witchcraft and were hanged to death. There were even those who were wrongfully accused but were able to save their lives as they accepted that they had indulged in the act. These incidences took place in the region of Salem and these incidences were recognized as Salem Witch Trials. On the front the main reason for executing individuals was witchcraft, but the main reasons that are rational in nature are quite different. The rational reasons... for the...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Salem witch trials
...Section/# A Breakdown with Charity: The Salem Witch Trials: A Review The book A Break with Charity: The Salem Witch Trials delves into the issue of how the early Puritans engage with one another and held a warped and superstitious if you of the world in which they lived. Much as with many of the books written concerning the Salem witch trials, it is the belief of this reviewer that the author of the book sought to write it not only as a historical and objective account of the events that took place, but also as a stark warning to the dangers that a theocratic, superstitious, and close minded community can affect not only upon themselves,...
3 Pages(750 words)Book Report/Review
Reflection of Gender and Power in the Salem Witchcraft Trials
...15 October Reflection of Gender and Power in the Salem Witchcraft Trials Salem Witch Trials can be perceived as an iconic event in the annals of American history that has evoked a lot of interest and controversies. This contentious episode occurred in the New England during 1692, in which several girls in the village demonstrated mysterious symptoms and the Massachusetts administration, under the influence of religious leaders, put to death 19 women on the assumption that they are involved in witchcraft, which caused the problem. An analysis of the event, with reference to the cultural norms prevalent during the era, reveals that gender...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Salem witch trials
....132). The arrival of Sir William Phips as governor of Massachusetts witnessed thirty-eight people in custody in Boston and Salem, awaiting trial for witchcraft; so, in order to handle the witchcraft prosecutions, the governor convened a special “Commission of Oyer and Terminer” – “to hear and determine” in French legal terminology – and nine judges were appointed (Norton, 2003, pp.168-170). The Court of Oyer and Terminer was called into session at the Salem Town courthouse on June 2; and after all the witnesses had testified and the case was turned over to the jury, Bridget Bishop was convicted and sentenced to death (Norton, 2003, pp.206-207). Although...
10 Pages(2500 words)Book Report/Review
Stefko, Salem Witchcraft Trials
...Stefko, Salem Witchcraft Trials Cohen, Daniel. Voodoo, Devils and the New Invisible World. New York: Dodd, Mead & Company, 1972. Guiley, Rosemary Ellen. The Encyclopedia of Witches & Witchcraft. New York: Facts on File, Inc., 1999. The most infamous and well-known witchcraft trials in the United States occurred in Salem, Massachusetts during the years 1692 and 1693. One hundred and forty-one people were arrested, including children as young as four, nineteen were hanged and one was pressed to death. The hysteria began in the home of the Reverend Samuel Parris, who, prior to becoming a minister, had been a...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Salem Trials
...of the of the Salem Trials 28 May, 2006 A grave social misconduct, unfounded suspicions, academic inadequacies, social injustice and oppression are but few of the characteristics that defines the nature of the Salem trials in 1692. This chapter of our history illuminated a smear of sociopolitical blunder that hindered freedom, propagated maltreatment and impeded due process for the accused. From a small town in Massachusetts, the Salem trial began as a rumor that origin from a group of young women who were allegedly practicing witchery act. Their friends and neighbors knew about this and began confronting them why they were doing an act...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Witchcraft Trials
...for getting a fair trial. Though Christianity has been known for its focus on repentance and forgiving, Nider (1476) narrated that a man who truly repented and disclosed the methods by which he and his wife were initiated into witch craft, was not spared of death. It was even officially permissible to make the accused believe that he/she would be spared if he/she disclosed all the secrets of witchcraft they had learned, and then to kill him/her without any guilt or bad conscience (Nider, 1476; Malleus Maleficarum, 1486). When such outright cheating and murder is permissible in a society officially, the matter of fair trial does not come up at all. The legal definition of right to a fair...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay
Salem Witch Trials
...Salem Witch Trials: The Dynamics of a Botched Justice Details: al Affiliation: Salem Witch Trials: The Dynamics of a Botched Justice 1. Why were both men and women accused of being witches? The accusations that led to the Salem Witch Trials, culminating into the hanging of several men and women in Salem originated from the strange and disorderly behaviors from a group of girls that included screaming alongside peculiar utterances while contorting themselves into strange positions, leading William Griggs, the village doctor, who validated his analysis by the direct name calling confessions in the cries by tormented...
1 Pages(250 words)Coursework
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Let us find you another Essay on topic The Salem Witchcraft Trials for FREE!
Contact Us