Nobody downloaded yet

The League of Nations and Collective Security - Article Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
In the paper “The League of Nations to Deliver Its Goals of Collective Security” the author analyzes the League of Nations, which marked a shift from the traditional ‘balance of power’ diplomacy to new diplomacy, which gave greater weight to the spirit of ‘collective security’…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER94.7% of users find it useful
The League of Nations and Collective Security
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "The League of Nations and Collective Security"

Download file to see previous pages The "favorite technique is to institute measures of co-operation and consultation with a view to preventing war by moderating and restraining the free-for-all operation of the international anarchy" (Buzan, 163). Thus the setting up of the League of Nations, [and later the United Nations] was a paradigm shift from a policy of national defense to one of collective security. However, the League of Nations failed to achieve its goal of securing international peace and security, amply proven by the fact that the world was at war again within twenty years of its formation. Nevertheless, the failure of the League of Nations cannot be called a failure of the idea of collective security. It was more a failure of political will amongst nations to look beyond their own short-term gains in order to make collective security a workable proposition.
According to Meg Harney, "While an excellent idea, in theory, the League met with repeated problems simply because the nations had not adapted their foreign policy to change to look after, instead of looking after the interests of the League as a whole working unit". The lack of political will among the bigger nations to implement collective security is evident in the stand taken by the big powers vis--vis the League of Nations. The rejection of the Treaty of Versailles by the US and by extension to the League was almost a 'death blow' to the fledgling organization. As a result of domestic political compulsions, US President Woodrow Wilson failed to garner the support of the Senate, which according to the US Constitution is the body responsible for ratification of any treaty. The Senate voted against the Treaty and as a result, the US did not become a member of the League of Nations. This left Great Britain, France, Italy, and Japan as the main powers in the League of Nations. According to Karl Schmidt, "The majority of the British public supported the ideals of the League, but the British government viewed the League largely with indifference". This was largely due to the fact that men like Lloyd George, Stanley Baldwin, and Curzon who dominated the government of the day believed in the 'old diplomacy'. Lloyd George preferred, as per Karl Schmidt, "Diplomacy by conference - where the great powers would meet in a less formal setting to discuss problems - to any such system as the League". Apart from this, the British were also affected by the US defection, as they did not want to shoulder the responsibility of single-handedly securing the peace in Europe. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Collective Security Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/politics/1513280-collective-security-essay
(Collective Security Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 Words)
https://studentshare.org/politics/1513280-collective-security-essay.
“Collective Security Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/politics/1513280-collective-security-essay.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF The League of Nations and Collective Security

Foundation of the League of Nations

.... This technique was accepted by different nations and this agreement led to the formation of the League of Nations officially in the year of 1920 on 10th of January (UNOG, “Organization and Establishment”). The agreement outlined certain objectives for the League of Nations which was to be followed by the members. According to UNOG there were basically three objectives: “to ensure collective security, to assure functional cooperation, and to execute the mandates of peace treaties” (UNOG, “Organization and Establishment”). After the ‘Peace Treaty of Versailles’, the League of Nations was...
8 Pages(2000 words)Research Paper

League of Nations

...?McCarthy, Helen. "Leading from the Centre: The League of Nations Union, Foreign Policy and 'Political Agreement' in the 1930s". Contemporary BritishHistory. 23.4 (2009): 527-542. This article takes a look at the New Party, which was part of the League of Nations in the 1930s. The authors felt that by concentrating on one small part, they would be able to understand why this was such a controversial movement. The New Party was instituted in order to bridge a gap between socialism and capitalism when the Crisis of 1931 happened. This party rejected the collective League system. This was a product of Mosley's and it would serve as a historical debate later. The article is informative and interesting in light of the various aspects... of the...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

League of Nations

...the United States was not controlled properly by the league. The member nations was not prepared to contribute troops to the League of Nations, as a result the military force became ineffective. Moreover, there was a failure in doctrine of collective security. The League also could not oblige other countries for accepting the decisions. In 1930, League however, failed to characterize the views of four most powerful nations. The United States never joined the members of League. In 1933, Japan left the membership of league, Germany though joined in 1926,...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

League of Nations

...League of Nations Coming into being after the end of World War I, the League of Nations is usually reminded for its failure to prevent World War II, disregarding the many successes and lessons the League left for the forthcoming years to the international order, and the circumstances and global atmosphere under which was created and developed its activities. These circumstances certainly were not favorable (Benes (1929-1930): 212). However, the legacy of the League cannot be questioned. Founded as a result of the Treaty of Versailles on January 15th, 1919 as an idea mainly adopted by the Democratic US President Woodrow Wilson —...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Failure of the League of Nations

...FAILURE OF THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS: WAS THE UNITED STATES RESPONSIBLE? War weariness is a common phenomenon, more so when the gains from such wars are intangible and far removed from domestic affairs. In the aftermath of prolonged periods of conflict, “war prevention assumes a high priority…[and]…the favoured technique is to institute measures of cooperation and consultation…with a view to preventing war…”(Buzan 1983, 163). The League of Nations established in 1919 in the aftermath of World War I, was one such attempt to change the focus of war prevention from individual to collective security. For such an organization to be effective,...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

The League of Nations

...are intangible and far removed from domestic affairs. In the aftermath of prolonged periods of conflict, "war prevention assumes a high priority[and]the favoured technique is to institute measures of cooperation and consultationwith a view to preventing war"(Buzan 1983, 163). The League of Nations established in 1919 in the aftermath of World War I, was one such attempt to change the focus of war prevention from individual to collective security. For such an organization to be effective, it had perforce to have the backing of the major powers. Great Britain, France, Italy, Japan, and later Germany and Russia - all great powers in their own right - joined the...
9 Pages(2250 words)Essay

Collective Security

...Question: Why is collective security important in international relations Answer: In the world today, all s are the main actors in the international system. They have goals ranging from national security to national welfare to the elevation of a philosophy. Following and shielding such goals frequently direct towards disagreement between states. However, along with these disagreements, states also try to make the world safer, where conflicts could not reoccur. Thus, in order to reduce the unanticipated and adverse situations, states have determined both familiar and prescribed, imperatives and establishments to direct their connections. To preserve peace after World War I the League of Nations was created in 1920 and the principle... of...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Peacekeeping and Collective Security

...the international peace and security'' criterion. Iraq's invasion of Kuwait was exceptional in being the type of conflict the charter writers had in mind. Most of the conflicts with which the UN is now involved are civil or ethnic--domestic matters into which the Security Council is not supposed to pry. This raises all kinds of questions about the limits to national sovereignty. Most countries have something they would rather the world did not scrutinise: among the bigger countries, China has Tibet, India Kashmir, Britain Northern Ireland. The Latin American countries tend to be particularly twitchy; they reacted badly when the UN, without even pretending it had anything to do with...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

The Role of the United Nations in a Collective Security

...The Role of the United Nations in a Collective Security The concept of collective security as enunciated in VII of the United Nations Charterwas crafted with the aim of preventing inter-state conflicts and to deter the occurrence of another war. This is not surprising considering that it was the 2nd World War that spurred the creation of the United Nations (UN). Section 1 of Chapter 1 of the Charter initially and briefly referred to this concept when it laid down the purposes of the creation of the UN: “to maintain international peace and security, and to that end; to take collective...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

The League of Nations and United Nations

...which was created with the mission to maintain world peace. The tools to achieve world peace were identified to be collective security and disarmament in order to prevent wars. The Covenant of the late organization also includes the institution of arbitration to settle international disputed to avoid the risk of war. Furthermore, issues like labor treaties, just treatment for the inhabitants, human trafficking, drug trafficking, global health, arms trade, protection of minority rights and prevailing issue of prisoners of war were also crucial concerns of the League of Nations. From the time period between September 1934 to February 1935, the organization had 58 members....
12 Pages(3000 words)Coursework
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Article on topic The League of Nations and Collective Security for FREE!

Contact Us