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Examination of the U.S. Electoral College: The Pros and the Cons - Term Paper Example

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This essay Examination of the U.S. Electoral College: The Pros and the Cons talks that although America makes the boast that as a nation, she leads in the movement of democracy in the Western world, there are blatant irregularities in the democratic process that contradict her claims…
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Examination of the U.S. Electoral College: The Pros and the Cons
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Download file to see previous pages This essay declares that investigating the Electoral College and appointing of electors are critical in considering the fairness of American democracy. The Electoral College is made up of the electors pledged to support either Republican or Democratic candidate for President. Every four years, each political party sends up a nominee who runs for candidacy in the Electoral College. This action follows the order of the 12th Amendment that says that, “each State shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of Electors”.
This discussion explores that electors are chosen by the State, for that reason, the State’s interests would be more involved in government than the people’s. This authority placed within the state excludes the participation of the average American citizen from having a say in who has to vote at the Presidential elections. Since this power to decide is out of reach for the average citizen, this lack of access causes one to doubt in the democratic process. In the book, Why the Electoral College is Bad for America, George Edwards writes that “the state legislators have plenary power over appointing electors and could even refuse to provide for the appointment of any electors if they so chose. Moreover, there is no constitutional right to the public to vote for electors”. This plenary power belonging to the State is full and absolute. ...
First of all, electors are chosen by the State, for that reason, the State’s interests would be more involved in government than the people’s. This authority placed within the state excludes the participation of the average American citizen from having a say in who has to vote at the Presidential elections. Since this power to decide is out of reach for the average citizen, this lack of access causes one to doubt in the democratic process. In the book, Why the Electoral College is Bad for America, George Edwards writes that “the state legislators have plenary power over appointing electors and could even refuse to provide for the appointment of any electors if they so chose. Moreover, there is no constitutional right to the public to vote for electors” (Edwards 5). This plenary power belonging to the State is full and absolute. This position only reflects the requirements of the U.S. Constitution laid down by early lawmakers viewing that the people would not be competent to have a say in rule and cancels out any illusion of personal rights to vote for electors. Democratic principles must guide leadership, based on freedom, equality and justice, for fair and equal treatment of members and balanced distribution of power, nevertheless the Electoral College strays from this rule because of regard to a smaller class. This preference takes away democratic power from the people. The bottom line is that electors after having won the right to vote for president can choose to betray their party and the members who elected them. Within the Electoral College, the interests of the minorities are not respected or represented instead, it is the protected interests of a few. Democracy, derived from the word demos, ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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