StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Federalists v. AntiFederalists - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The ratification of the current United States Constitution went through a long process of nationwide consultative processes that was also wrought with huge controversies from individuals and groups with special interests in business, agriculture or political inclinations regarding the implications of the constitution to the afore stated interests…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER99% of users find it useful
Federalists v. AntiFederalists
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Federalists v. AntiFederalists"

Download file to see previous pages It should also be noted that a main precursor to the proposed federalism was the ratification of the constitution as spelled out in the so-called Articles of the Confederation. For the proposed constitution to be ratified it was required that all thirteen member states were to express their consent through ratification from elected representatives from the states concerned. It was no secret to the delegates working on the new constitution that achieving this consensus is certainly an up hill task taking into account the level of economic, social and political polarization that had characterized the nation following the heels of the revolutionary civil war. The most credible alternative that would usher in progress in the ratification process in the phase of the potential deadlock that could was seen in what can be described as crafty means of bending through the hill as proposed and implemented by the delegates. It was agreed that the proposed constitution could still be implemented granted nine out of the thirteen member states ratified the constitution. ...
ts of federalism did also caution that the failure of some member states to ratify the constitution should not be utterly dismissed with a relegation to isolation bearing in mind that the lack of a universal consensus in the ratification process should not be misconstrued for a potentially smooth sailing experience for the nine ratified states. It was on this premise that the federalist marshaled all their available resources together in a campaign geared at winning the federalism debate.
The dividing factor in the constitutional debate became so charged and acrimonious that neither the federalists nor the anti-federalist were willing to cede considerable grounds in the debate. Eventually, the federalists school of thought won the debate resulting in the complete ratification of the constitution by all nine states in the federation; thanks largely to the strong and active propaganda machinery of the federalist school of thought.
Besides the question of the ratification of the constitution the federalists and the anti-federalists were divided on a broad stream of other policies that had to do with the emerging questions of statehood, rights of citizens and a host of others. Suffice to cite a few illustrations to buttress the foregoing assertion. For instance, the bloc that stood opposed to federalism preferred a lesser role to be assigned to the central government in the management of the affairs of the state and its citizens, in contrast to the strong central government role as requested by the federalist politicians. In denouncing central government dominance, anti-federalism called for a more developed legislative base at the state level. Meanwhile, both opponents and proponents of federalism did however express a common need to disband the Articles of ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Federalists v. AntiFederalists Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1501132-federalists-v-antifederalists
(Federalists V. AntiFederalists Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1501132-federalists-v-antifederalists.
“Federalists V. AntiFederalists Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1501132-federalists-v-antifederalists.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Federalists v. AntiFederalists

Hamilton Federalists 16

... HAMILTON FEDERALISTS 16 The federalists’ wrote a total of 85 articles that promoted the approval of the U.S constitution.The 85 essays were written by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay with Alexander writing 51 essays, Madison 26 and jays writing 5 articles, the rest were a partnership between Madison and Hamilton. The Hamilton 16 was a 2nd part in the essays that argue that the federal laws should apply to the people and not just the states. Hamilton addresses the need for the federal government to legislate directly over the people of the United States. I agree with Hamilton on the Government having control on the activities of the people. By so doing the government not only controls what states do but also...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

The Federalists Republic

... American Passages by Edward Ayers, Lewis Gould, David Oshinsky and Jean Soderlund Chapter 7: “The Federalists Republic, 1789-1799” Report Opposing Visions of America George Washington’s victory to presidency came after creation of the new constitution. Many Federalists disagreed with specific parts of the constitution and made arrangements to replace the Confederation. Conflicts that arose over policies, the varying interpretation of the constitution, and the competition that was present for power which led to the development of political parties. Political diversions emerged during Washington’s first administration, one of the sides choosing to favor commerce while the other agriculture. The two conception of America’s future led...
5 Pages(1250 words)Book Report/Review

Federalists Paper

...FEDERALIST PAPER by Alexander Hamilton Book Critique "The Federalists Paper as the most important interpretation of the United s Constitution". The most important interpretation of the United States Constitution is the compilation of 85 Federalist Papers who's one of the three founding authors and acted as the major and primary contributor is Alexander Hamilton, a statesman and a leader in working the United States Constitutional Convention which is written and published in the year 1787 and 1788 respectively. Fifty one writings belong to the intelligent idea and workmanship of Hamilton. He is also a political analyst, lawyer, officer of an Army, a politician during his time, and a great Federalist. Along with him are John Jay...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

The Federalists Vs. the Republicans

... national tyranny. To assure compliance with these rigid federalist policies, the decision made in Marbury vs. Madison upheld the Supreme Court's ultimate power to interpret and decide. Works Cited Marbury v. Madison (1803). 2000. Street Law Inc. 12 Mar. 2008 . Smith, George F. " From Rights of Man, by Thomas Paine." Thomas Paine on War and Taxes. 3 July 2003. George F Smith Archive. 12 Mar. 2008 . The Alien and Sedition Acts, 1798. Ed. William H. Huff. 2008. 12 Mar. 2008 . "Transcript of Constitution of the United States (1787)." 100 Milestone Documents. National Archives. 12 Mar. 2008 ....
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Federalists and the AntiFederalists

...Federalist and Anti-Federalist After the end of the revolutionary war, the Americans were free from British control, so they wanted to build their own governmental system, where the central government had no control over the states. This gave the states complete power which led to them not respecting other countries. This led to a lot of thinking and it was believed that a document had to be made, which led to the creation of the Constitution. The making of the American Constitution involved hours of debate and negotiation. Yet some delegates were not happy with the outcome of the constitution after its completion. The final Constitution had to be approved and ratified or approved by the each state. The making of the Constitution led...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Debate and Conflict Between Federalists and Anti Federalists

... Federalists versus Anti-Federalists The U.S. Constitution was proposed and drafted at a convention convened in Philadelphia in 1787 by a distinguished group of influential men headed by Alexander Hamilton. At this time, its ratification in 1789 was far from assured. In all of the thirteen colonies, differing interests and groups both supported and opposed a federal constitution, sparking an intense public debate. Those in favor of the proposed constitution including Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay wrote a series of essays (85) that were published in newspapers referred to as the Federalist Papers. Those opposed to the constitution, the Anti-Federalists which included John Hancock, Patrick Henry and Samuel Adams, also wrote...
9 Pages(2250 words)Coursework

Debate between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists

...Though the delegates at Philadelphia produced the Constitution, ratification was far from assured. While many saw the need for an organized, democratic national government, many people that remembered British tyranny were against the formation of such an institution. This led to the division into two separate groups in support of and opposed to the Constitution, known as the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, respectively. While each side had strong arguments to support their positions, the Anti-Federalists proved the most idealistic and democratic, though the leadership of the Federalists would prove too effective to overcome. The formation of the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists seemed inevitable from the inception of the Articles...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Federalists and Republicans

... Federalists and Republicans Introduction Originally, there existed only one party in America which was called the Federalists. This party was the only governing body in America. In 1793, another party emerged. The Republicans were also known as the Democratic-Republican Party. This party was formed as a result of Thomas Jefferson's resignation from the cabinet (Murrin and et al 56). His resignation was due to his opposition to the federalists’ policies which he insisted were based on corruption and oppression of the poor. The two parties had huge differences as far as domestic and foreign policies were concerned. The Federalists aimed at enriching the wealthy class in the community whereas...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Why did Antifederalists oppose Constitution

...The anti-federalists were a group of people that believed in having a federal government that was weaker than the individual governments. Their ideal type of government was like the one that existed under the Articles of Confederation. They wanted individuals and states to have the most power and the most control over what happened in the government. The national government should not be able to overrule the states. It should function as a way of providing essential services that the nation needed, like negotiating treaties and raising an army, but beyond a few vital functions, the federal government should be weak. When the Constitution was drafted, anti-federalists resisted it. They wrote and gave speeches against the Constitution...
2 Pages(500 words)Admission/Application Essay

The Antifederalists: critics of the constitution

... The Anti-federalists: Critics of the Constitution Question The thesis of the article centers on the voices of the Anti-federalists who felt the US Constitution did not advocate for equal rights of both black and the whites during the creation of the federal system of governance. The author has attempted to project real and critical debate that underscored the implication of the American Revolution, as well as the direction of the US future. As indicated in the article, America consisted of various groups that had distinct economic, social, and political life. In essence, Main has succeeded in showing that the efforts of the Anti-federalists were for the advantage of all as opposed to a certain section of the society. Question 2...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

FP Iran V. Secretary of State for the Home Department

...Running Head: FP (IRAN) V. SECRETARY OF FOR THE HOME FP (Iran) V. Secretary of for the Home Department of Institution) Critical Assessment of significance of the case of “FP (Iran) V. Secretary of State for the Home Department” in the development of Administrative Law Introduction With the advent of civilisation and the law making process, it has been the endeavour of man to ensure that Rule of Law prevails in all decisions made in disputes. Judges have accepted time and again that just as everybody has certain rights that are subject to prevailing laws, so also all officials upholding the law have a responsibility to ensure that they shall not commit any act without proper justification. Administrative Law is a set of governing principles...
8 Pages(2000 words)Assignment

Employment Law: Simpson v AFS and Tom Barnes Case

What is usually required is that the person vicariously liable has in some manner conceivably authorized the conduct giving rise to the tort. There are three circumstances in which one person may be held vicariously liable for the misconduct of another.1 They are:

1. A master/servant relationship such as an employer/employee. In these types of relationships, the master is liable for the misconduct of an employee provided the latter is acting in the course of his or her employment.

On the facts of the case for discussion, the vicarious liability involved turns on the master/servant or employer/employee relationship. The general rule is that it is the nature and circumstances of the actual employment that justi...
13 Pages(3250 words)Case Study

Informal v. Formal Remittances

In this case, the transfer of money across the borders becomes an issue of primary importance for many families internationally (especially when these families are located in developing countries). In practice, it has been found that the transfer of money internationally can present significant failures especially when the firms involved do not take the appropriate measures for the protection of the consumer. However, in the case of workers, such an outcome can lead to severe consequences (the financial support of the family faces a delay within unknown outcomes). In the literature, the transfer of money across the world has been an issue extensively analyzed. Most of the relevant studies prove that the lack of appropriate technol...
37 Pages(9250 words)Assignment

Analysis of Lemuel Shaw 1830 Roberts v. The City of Boston Case

In 1801, Lemuel Shaw started studying law and was admitted to the bar in September 1804; after which he started practicing in Boston. Slowly his practice became large, however, he also served as the adviser of several commercial enterprises. Not only that, he held many public positions, from 1811 – 1814, as well as in 1820 and 1829, he was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, during 1820 he also was a member of the constitutional convention, while in 1821 –1822, he served as a state senator. He was offered the position of Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court; after being so appointed in 1830, he served there for 30 years, till August 21, 1860, when he resigned. He had four children from t...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

Analysis of the Case of Hickman v Kent or Romney Marsh Sheepbreeders Association Ltd

There were several basic legal provisions that gave direction to the formation of a company in the United Kingdom. It has its original foundation in 1844 when the Joint Stock Companies Act1 1844 was formulated. It has given regulations for facilitating the formation of companies by "deed of settlement". Gradually, the shareholder concept was initiated in 1855 by the general incorporation procedure in the name of Limited Liability Act2 1855. This has offered limited liability to shareholders and provided identification to the company as a separate legal persona. The doctrine of limited liability postulates that a company shall be liable for the debts that it incurs, and even if it undergoes closure for any grounds, creditors cannot...
6 Pages(1500 words)Case Study

John Lockes View of Ownership in Context with the Mabo v Queensland

According to Ian Harris, Locke’s idea of justice simply suggests that the conformity between action & the rule of propriety should be understood in the sense of ‘a right to anything’ (Harris, 2000, p. 49). That means human rights must be restored in society, and when it comes to property, it can be examined in context with ‘abundance’. The more abundant is the property, the more usage of it can be met. However, the ‘abundance’ factor cannot be fulfilled in today’s economic conditions. Chapter V of the Second Treatise defines ‘property’ as land according to Locke and can be examined in two different ways. First, that land, property or external objects that are owned by...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

Henry V by Shakespeare and the Rover by Aphra Behn

Henry V recognizes that his kingship is not a rule of lavishness but a rule of service. Summarising everything of what Henry is, Nym, a commoner, and thief, claimed: “The King is a good King…” (Shakespeare, Henry V)
Second, his glib of tongue he uses to empower his soldiers, to give life and courage to his downtrodden men. He does not use his eloquence to deceive nor to perpetuate lies. Rather, he uses his articulateness to restore the bravery of his soldiers, to supplicate God in his favor. All of which is a recognition that Henry V values more the camaraderie that he has with his soldiers above anything else. And this he succinctly shows even as a young King. He said to his men as they are about to fight...
7 Pages(1750 words)Book Report/Review

The Case of R v Turnbull

The defendants planned to rob a bank’s customer deposits in the bank’s safe by posting a notice diverting the dropbox to another location, which they planned to burgle. Several customers did, in fact, drop their wallets loaded with money into the dropbox, however, one customer was suspicious and alerted the police. The strength of the prosecution’s case rested on the visual recognition provided by a police constable who clearly saw one of the defendants removing a sign from the bank premises and recognized him. On this basis, the court of appeal concluded that the appeal of the defendants could not stand. It was held that if visual identification had been the only evidence, the outcome would not have been definit...
10 Pages(2500 words)Case Study

Analysis of OReilly v Mackman Case

Judicial review is a concept which is constitutionally undecided as it on one side, it shores up the rule of law, democracy, and pre-eminence of parliament by facilitating the courts to check the boundaries of government authority and on another side, the courts are open to the decision on the plants based on the fact of separation of authorities that are intimating with the verdicts of democratically elected institutions. Judicial review is not apprehended with the virtues of government assessment but deals with whether the deciding authority has remained within the legal boundaries and whether broad principles of rationality and fairness adhere. The constitutional basis of judicial review is debated as one view holds that it is...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

International Affairs v. Liberalism

As a matter of fact, Hoffman’s statement that “international affairs is the nemesis of liberalism” has a grain of truth in it and this is especially so after the 9/11 incident.
There are two schools of thought or perspectives that are used to view international affairs: liberalism and realism. The study of these two perspectives is significant to the idea posed by Stanley Hoffman because they determine the reasons why international affairs, according to him, does not only see eye-to-eye with liberalism but seems to stand on the opposing side of it.
Liberalism can be defined as having four elements: citizens; the legislature; property rights, and; a market-driven economy (Dunne 186). Realism, on the othe...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Federalists v. AntiFederalists for FREE!

Contact Us