StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
In a general sense propaganda is the dissemination of information with the view to spread and promote a particular idea or attitude. It is otherwise referred to as psychological warfare. Linebarger defines propaganda as the "planned use of any form of communication designed to affect the minds, emotions, and action of a given group for a specific purpose" (qtd…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER92.2% of users find it useful
Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism"

Download file to see previous pages Totalitarianism is a new form of government falling into the general classification of dictatorship, a system in which technologically advanced instruments of political power are wielded without restraint by centralized leadership of an elite movement for the purpose of affecting a total social revolution, including the conditioning of man on the basis of certain arbitrary ideological assumptions, proclaimed by the leadership in an atmosphere of coerced unanimity of the entire population. (qtd. in Linz 66).
Therefore in a totalitarian regime propaganda is the psychological weapon used to make the unassuming masses toe the political line. The role of propaganda in bringing about such a revolution has been emphasized. History is littered with examples of the use of propaganda in transforming hitherto placid peoples into bloodthirsty vengeful killers. Records of such unimaginable violence raise many questions about the darker side of human nature and what goads ordinary individuals into performing unspeakable acts. Thus the focus of this essay will be to study the psychological effects of propaganda in relation to totalitarianism.
Totalitarianism relied heavily on fear to control individuals, stifle resistance, root out dissent and eliminate opposition. According to Bramstedt, propaganda and fear share a symbiotic relationship, "Terror without propaganda would lose most of its psychological effect, whereas propaganda without terror does not contain its full punch" (175). Fear and terror were used to prompt individuals to behave in the manner approved by the regime. Propaganda had the effect of taking the edge out of the sting of terror by justifying the heavy-handed tactics employed as essential in the journey towards a bright future and by painting a rosy picture of the future under the current government.
The combined use of fear and propaganda to great effect was demonstrated in the aftermath of the Russian revolution. The Bolsheviks under Lenin unleashed the red terror on the populace to deal with the insurgents. The secret police known as the Cheka and the red army under Trotsky sought to destroy the anti-Bolsheviks with a firm hand. Thousands were executed in cold blood or imprisoned in concentration camps that spread like a rash throughout the country. The masses cowered in fear and were psychologically ripe for the effects of propaganda. Agitation propaganda had been employed by Lenin via inflammatory publications like the Pravda to discredit the Tsarist regime and to fan the flames of revolution. Having seen the revolution to its bloody end and by demonstrating their might the Bolsheviks set about establishing a totalitarian system. Propaganda was used to garner popular support for the government and to enlighten the masses about the benefits of communism. People were led to believe that communism was the panacea for all their problems and the rewards were manifold for those who embraced its tenets. Needless to say the masses were convinced and thus propaganda bolstered by fear laid the groundwork for the development of a powerful Soviet Russia.
The Nazis used a like combination of propaganda ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism Essay”, n.d.)
Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism Essay. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1500650-psychological-effects-of-propaganda-in-relation-to-totalitarianism
(Psychological Effects of Propaganda in Relation to Totalitarianism Essay)
Psychological Effects of Propaganda in Relation to Totalitarianism Essay. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1500650-psychological-effects-of-propaganda-in-relation-to-totalitarianism.
“Psychological Effects of Propaganda in Relation to Totalitarianism Essay”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/miscellaneous/1500650-psychological-effects-of-propaganda-in-relation-to-totalitarianism.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism

Effects of Human Resource Systems on Manufacturing Performance and Turnover

Most of these developments, not surprisingly, have come from communities of scholars focusing on their own particular countries or regions, be it the US (for example, Arthur, 1994; Delery and Doty, 1996; Huselid et al., 1997), the UK (for example, Brewster, 1999; Guest et al., 2003), elsewhere in Europe (for example, D’Arcimoles, 1997; Lahteenmaki et al., 1998; Roderiguez and Ventura, 2003). The difference in perspective on the value of people in organizations and the validity of HRM, particularly in non-Western Countries may be best understood in terms of the concept of locus of human value (Jackson et al., 2003). Jackson et al. (2003) came up with a conceptual map of international organization and human resource management...
12 Pages(3000 words)Essay

Effects of Menopause on Women's Life

It is typically accompanied by some distressing physical and psychological symptoms in women that also impact middle adulthood. There is variation in the age at which menopause occurs; in the USA the average age at menopause is 51 years, but the usual range is 45 to 56 years. For unknown reasons ovaries gradually begin to change on hormone production during a womens mid-30s. In the womens the late 40s, the process speeds up and hormones fluctuate or change more causing irregular periods.

Some womens periods stop suddenly; others experience a perimenopause, a phase of irregular menstruation, and symptoms such as memory disturbance, bloating and feeling tired, that may be troublesome for 5 to 10 years. (Brown, 2002)
...
6 Pages(1500 words)Case Study

What Are the Effects of Industrial Pollution to Nature in Turkey

It is observed that electroplating and chemical industries are responsible for the generation of a considerable portion of emissions that contain heavy metals, and may affect adversely on human lives and environment. On the other hand, sugar, pharmaceuticals, and textile industries are responsible for the generation of organic pollutants in the atmosphere. Refineries, fertilizers, stone mines, and thermal power units are mainly the causing sectors of contributing a substantial amount of air pollution in the Turkish atmosphere. In specific, sulfur, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide are some of the main pollutants that are generated from the burning of fuels in the abovementioned industries in Turkey. Though vehicular sources also cont...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

The Main Believers of Totalitarianism

Operation Barbarossa was conceived to put Russia and Stalin on their knees. Hitler’s resolve to decimate Russia in three months time was on the verge of being manic. Behind his back however, Stalin was also cooking a diabolical concoction for Hitler i.e. he was “preparing a preventive strike at Germany”.2
Hitler left no stone unturned in this offensive. He paraded 3.5 million Wehrmacht troops reinforced with Panzer tanks and hovered protectively by the famed Luftwaffe aircrafts. He then positioned these on a 2,000 mile frontier border from the Black Sea in the Crimea to the White Sea in the Arctic region. Because the Red Army troops were mostly inexperienced, the Germans easily captured most of the western R...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

How Does the US Media Effects Evolve in Singapores Current Media

Lewis and Slade (2000, p. 223) in their critical evaluation of the effects of media communication on the audience argue that media effect is achieved incongruent with social context. Their study recounts the experiment on the influence of television on identity in Singapore indicates that US social values and Singaporean values greatly differ from each other. The sharp differences in program content have a negative influence on the audience because Chinese raised Singaporeans value marriage, social values, and collectivism whereas US social culture involves career, family and the struggle to balance the two. Therefore the question of US media's influence to destabilize Singaporean national identity is limited. This view is emphasi...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

Youth Aggression and Violence: A Psychological Approach

Fergusson et. al. (2002) state that deviant peer choices are prone to contribute to an adolescences propensity to commit the crime, and that this is consistent with a growing amount of evidence. However, their study was able to study how deviant peer choices affects on a crime committed by the adolescent at different ages. The results showed that deviant peer choices and their influence on youth crime decreases as the adolescent gets older. Fergusson et. al. (2002) believe that these results are in accordance with developmental stages, as escalating life experience would ensure less vulnerability to peer influence.

Additionally, evidence shows the affects an unstable family environment can have psychologically and behav...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

The Nature of God and Its Relation to Mission

It is God's agent in history, through whom He works by historical processes. Men learn of God and respond to Him in the context of their whole lives as personal, social beings because of the activity of the Christian community. Thesis Mission theology occupies a central role in religious teaching and supported by the main dogmas and principles of theology.

The main texts Genesis 12, Exodus 9 and 19, Numbers 14, several parts in Deuteronomy, Joshua, 1 Samuel, 1 King, 1 Chronicle, Psalm, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Daniel, Micah, Habbakuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Jonah's story is considered a missionary book of the Old Testament1. Christians have so understood their role. Jesus' understanding of his role...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

The Effects of Media to Its Audience

The effects of the media can be attributed to the interaction with the different components of society. Media refers to the components of communication in different forms. When a layman is asked regarding the definition of media, the different forms such as television, radio and internet are the main answers. Basically, these examples have the common denominator of being able to communicate with the target population or the audience (Cardwell 1-3).

In the process of effective communication, the effects that can be incurred to the audience can be explained on the basis of different views and aspects. Included in the said issues is the capability of the audience to intercept and understand the stimuli and signals that are...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

The Effects of Financial Crisis on Supplier Selection Criteria of the Oil and Gas Industry Equipment Market

It is a difficult task to find those vendors who not only have the adequate quality and quantity of the needed raw materials but who also have an attitude of efficiency and display commitment to customer service (Sonmat, 2006). Further, organizations also strive to locate and select vendors who can be depended upon for long term relationship.

The number of factors or attributes desired from the vendor is vast, and different organizations and different industries place different importance on the attributes (Sonmat, 2006). Some of the vendor attributes may gain importance owing to the nature of the industry, for example, in the case of consumer perishables suppliers, like fresh vegetables or fruits, the buying firm would...
20 Pages(5000 words)Literature review

Effects of the United States of America Troops in South Korea

Despite the few negative incidences of crime committed by the United States of America’s security troops that were deployed in the country on a peacekeeping mission.
Since the war in Korea began in the early nineteen fifties, the United States has stationed tens of thousands of soldiers, mostly the United States’ army personnel, in South Korea. Through the assistance of the South Korean troops and other neighboring governments, the American troops have been able to guard and offer maximum security to South Korean people. In line with the argument of James (2003), ‘most of the military bases in South Korea are relatively isolated’ thus the need for much attention from the troops so as to ensure maximum...
10 Pages(2500 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Psychological effects of Propaganda in relation to Totalitarianism for FREE!

Contact Us