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Inclusive Education: main principles - Essay Example

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Inclusive education is a necessity in today's time. Why are some people, who although need special attention are completely ignored by the society rather than doing their extra bit in helping them grow and groom as a person and evolve as a better human being…
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Inclusive Education: main principles
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Download file to see previous pages They are included in the feeling of belonging among other students, teachers, and support staff.
Traditional schooling is exclusive, it's designed to identify the "best" and weed out the "worst". The best go on to university, the mediocre go to technical schools and the worst drop out. Success for the teacher and the student is frequently judged by these categories.
Now if we go by the way of exclusive education only then people who are in some how physically lagging behind are always left out. Does this mean that they don't have any right to learn and grow and develop as a normal individual
If the people who are in every way leading a perfect life and are very successful in their pursuits of excellence categorize things like this then what good has education done to them On the contrary they should be the ones encouraging the trend of inclusive education .We as teachers should understand our moral responsibility and understand that these individuals have every right to live in mainstream, there is no law in the world which bars them from being a part of mainstream. If we understand this very basic thing and do the needful in the proper direction then we definitely can make this world a better place to live.
Now if consider the case of normal classroom where majority are normal students and some are physically challenged ones. When teacher is teaching the class then the normal students are definitely going to grasp the things normally as it may seem pretty normal to them but those who are in some way challenged physically are going to face certain problems for sure. It's the moral responsibility of the teacher to cater to their needs, he/she as an individual should understand the psychology of that group of students and without demoralizing them in any way should rather help them and encourage them further so that the try their level best and can grasp as do other normal students.
As an example we can say in a class if there are twenty students and out of them two are dyslexic now when other students are making notes of lectures and grasp every thing taught by the teacher very normally these two children will be unable to relate to the topic being taught as words will be more like being bombarded upon them rather being taught, and if teacher follows his normal practice in class regarding his teaching then for sure at the time of exams these two are going to have a difficult time and when results come out and they will be scolded by the teacher and parents. This is going to have a negative impact on these children and in a sense will discourage them and initiate a feeling in them that education is not their cup of tea.
If same practice is followed then obviously this is going to discourage them and every time they will feel shy in raising their problems for the fear of being thrashed in front of other students. This is a part of human psychology that they always fear public disgrace rather they would prefer remaining silent and living with their problem. This fear of disgrace will always hinder them from coming forward and telling others their problem, so being a responsible teacher one should take a serious note of ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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