Nobody downloaded yet

Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation and Risk Reduction - Case Study Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
“This is because it is the place with the area information and it is also the immediate response centers during the occurrence of the floods” (The state of Floridas Division…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.3% of users find it useful
Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation and Risk Reduction
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation and Risk Reduction"

Download file to see previous pages This information will all be acquired at the city council’s office or the city building authority
The other important aspect of this floor plan is to get information about the infrastructure, drainages and gutters, general slope of the land, any nearby streams and rivers, underground pipes and cables and other features that are in the area. It also helps in determining the accessibility of the whole area, type of terrain, location of the safe houses and whether they can easily be accessed
“The rapid needs assessment is a description of the extent of the damage that is sustained by the community. It is the general scope of the disaster in the area” (Flood plain management, 2011). This information can be acquired in the local authorities or any disaster management officials in the city, such as the Red Cross. The rapid needs assessment contains information on:
Medical needs and availability of resources – This is information on the injuries, loss of lives and the number of victims that required assistance. It also states the number of medical teams that were at the scene of rescue and the facilities that are functional in the area. The availability of adequate medical equipment and supplies and the requirement for outside assistance are also documented in this assessment.
Mass care – This is the mass equipment such as shelter, food and water and relief supplies that are available for the rescued group and the community in general once they are moved from the affected areas.
Effect on infrastructure – This is the assessment of the amount of damage caused to the infrastructure. This is the impact on things such as buildings, roads, sewages and drainages, power generating facilities, schools and hospitals, communication lines, water pipes and distribution facilities.
Release of dangerous materials – These are the materials that may have been released and can cause harm to the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation Case Study”, n.d.)
Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation Case Study. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/military/1597547-incident-command-system-principles-and-features-part-i-mitigation-and-risk-reduction
(Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation Case Study)
Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation Case Study. https://studentshare.org/military/1597547-incident-command-system-principles-and-features-part-i-mitigation-and-risk-reduction.
“Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation Case Study”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/military/1597547-incident-command-system-principles-and-features-part-i-mitigation-and-risk-reduction.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation and Risk Reduction

Incident Command System

... Incident Command System A designated Incident Commander will head an organization that will be activated when a disaster event has been identified and declared. The Incident Commander shall be pre-designated and identified during the disaster planning ahead of any disaster. An infinite succession mechanism that will allow for the seamless designation of a new incident commander shall be established if in case the primary Incident Commander is unable to perform or cannot effectively perform this function. All Incident...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Mitigation and risk reduction (case)

... well to ensure the quality and fitness of buildings in cities. References Government of Maharashtra. (2000). “Great Mumbai disaster management plan-risk assessment and response plan”, I. “10 Most devastating earthquakes of all times”. (March 12, 2010). Online colleges. Retrieved from http://current.com/1vgvc4c Wenzel, F. (2006). “Earthquake risk reduction- obstacles and opportunities”. European Review, 14 (2), 221-231.... ? Mitigation of Earthquakes: Impediments to Disaster Prevention in Mega Cities (College Mitigation of Earthquakes: Impediments to Disaster Prevention in Mega Cities Rampant growth of population and subsequent drifts to urbanization led to the emergence of mega cities especially in...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Mitigation and risk reduction

...high level of preparations and a building code that was implemented properly because very few buildings toppled during the earthquake. It can be said that most of the casualties were the result of the subsequent tsunami that hit eastern parts of Japan facing the Pacific Ocean. The local population is also very well informed. The relatively small number of deaths (as compared to the December 2004 tsunami that reached 250,000 dead or missing) is a testament to this meticulous preparation by the Japanese. The local population had performed several disaster drills before and those who got killed either had ignored the warning sirens or were caught flat-footed by the speed of the tsunami’s arrival. Many communities had...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Incident Command System

...?You have just been informed that an earthquake has occurred in Japan. You have been given the responsibility to oversee the implementation of the incident command system for this specific disaster. Please answer the following questions: 1. Briefly describe the key features of an incident command system and provide specific examples of how it would be implemented in your scenario. The key features of an incident command system (ICS) are: common terminology, modular organization, management by objectives, reliance on an incident action...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Mitigation and Risk Reduction

...hazard maps to identify high-risk prone areas such as from floods, earthquake or landslides. Responsibility for Implementation – it is the local government officials who are the ones responsible for implementation of any risk reduction and mitigation plans in their communities. They are the ones best positioned to do so based on their local knowledge and political authority. Which commander should assume – in the event of a hurricane or an earthquake, it is a bit better to let the fire chief take command rather than the police chief. This is because it is civil in nature only and requires a different response such as on triage...
4 Pages(1000 words)Case Study

Incident Command System: Disaster Preparedness

...? Incident Command System: Disaster Preparedness (Add (Add (Add Incident Command System: Disaster Preparedness Introduction A disaster can be any event, either natural or manmade, which is potent enough to threaten human lives, destruct property and infrastructure and hinder social life. Disaster preparedness can be termed as the state of readiness to contain the effects of a forecasted disaster event to mitigate the impact of the disaster. The impact includes loss of life, injury and damage to infrastructure and property. It means necessary steps are taken to offer rescue, relief, rehabilitation and all other necessary...
4 Pages(1000 words)Case Study

Incident Command

...Incident command INCIDENT COMMAND GRACE SARKAR Order No. 406412 22 February Table of Contents Introduction 3 Why is ICS needed for Buncefield depot 3 Various levels of command 5 Appropriate dynamic risk assessment 7 Identify and evaluate roles and responsibilities 8 Evaluate the need for effective liaison 11 Conclusion 12 Sources 14 INCIDENT COMMAND Introduction The series of explosions and subsequent fire that caused widespread damage at the Buncefield oil storage and transfer depot, Hemel Hempstead, on 11 December 2005...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Incident command

...evaluate the risk of the situation and relay information as fast as possible. The processes and procedures must also be structured in a way that it may counter fit any possible situation of incidents and emergencies depending on the nature of the facility and its surroundings. A standard organizational structure in managing incidents, regardless the cause, location and reason, is essential for public safety and incident control measures. There are a lot of factors that needs to be considered in order to develop and to implement an incident command system. Mobilization capabilities, effectively utilizing external...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

History of incident command system

...the expertise and ability to contain disasters. A disaster occurring at one point may easily be handled thanks to the management experience brought in by resources from other regions or non-governmental institutions. Lastly, planning and management of resources is enhanced by existence of incidence command system. Since several players come into play, a common pool of resources is also established. From this pool, appropriate allocation of resources needed for emergency operations can be allocated basing on the risk levels of a region relative to the other. Also, ICS helps minimize the extent of financial burden that a given local or state government may incur in a bid...
2 Pages(500 words)Assignment

Case INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM

...of local resources towards disaster management and the taking of pre-emptive measures for flood mitigation among others (Depoorter, 2006). The failure to use Geographical information systems (GIS) meant that based on past flooding incidents, the potential magnitude was unknown. As a result, the local leadership, planners and decision makers were ill prepared in terms of flood risk reduction activities (Tran et al, 2008). The apparent lack of policy review meant that the disaster planning in place was not in tandem with the structural and fiscal demands posed by the flooding disaster. Policy influences planning in terms of resource allocation and...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Case Study on topic Incident Command System; Principles and Features Part I; Mitigation and Risk Reduction for FREE!

Contact Us