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Training skills and implications of an aging workforce - Essay Example

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Training skills and implications of an aging workforce Institutional affiliation: Introduction The number of ageing workforce has been on the increase and has concerned the interest of academicians and organization members alike. The baby boomer generation poses an alarming predicament for organizations as speculation of mass retirement sets in…
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Training skills and implications of an aging workforce
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Download file to see previous pages Majority of organizations remain imprudent at best in their endeavor to supervise their personnel from retirement suitability to time or cost indispensable to fill an empty position. Such entities lack precious information, which is helpful in guiding and regulating future plans to respond to departing workers. Many baby boomers are likely to exit from organizations in the coming years. Upon their departure, they take away valuable knowledge and experience with them, which negatively impacts the organization (Davidson, Lepeak, & Newman, 2007). The ageing population in Europe and other modern nations and its impacts on the labor market with regards to the balance of labor scarcity or the outflow of personnel and likely costs is more than organization’s concern. The debate is dominating the political arena, with economic viewpoints on possible considerations also up-and-coming in the debate. For illustration, a recent report by the OECD laid out policies and punishments for organizations for laying-off elder workers. This course of action may have negative effects as it may lessen hiring rates of older workers. From this policy, commendations are clear as to the best kind of employment protection for ageing workers. That is, to increase their employability and increase the range of employment opportunities more generally. Several fields of action are set out, namely enhancing lifelong learning, the adaptation of training methods to the needs of ageing workers, as well as, the promotion of the delayed retirement of this group of employees. Some of the key barriers that may hinder improvement of older workers employability are; poor working conditions, poor or lack of public services to assist aging workers in their special needs, and their lower participation in training. Inflexible working schedules also hamper training needs to increase employability of ageing workers. Sufficient online services may partially fill of the gaps and offer additional services. A recent study of the Glasgow area holds that the use of ICT and online services provided in a community based course to unemployed people empowers them to accomplish high levels of income and skills for future jobs (Cabrera & Malanowski, 2009). Whenever the subject of the ageing population is mentioned, pointers always go for the baby boom generation, which generally refers to people born in 1946 to 1964. These people are likely to exit employment in the coming years. Ageing population is further compounded by attributes of generations following the baby boomers into the workforce, in relation to their volume, enthusiasm and skills. Subsequent generations following baby boom experienced fairly low birth rates, leading to lesser people entering the workforce to fill the gaps left by exiting workers. In addition, the generation X, Y, and Z are associated with high turnover rates. Indisputably, the ageing labor force will impact organizations in different ways, and the impacts depend on numerous factors. These are such as the present workforce, demographics and future capacity to attract substitute personnel. A critical examination on the potential impact of the ageing workers can aid organizations to initiate practical human ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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