StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Urbanization: economic stratification - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The Industrial Revolution that began in 1700 has transformed the population, culture, and the geographical use of space as the world evolved to accommodate new forms of agriculture and was spurred by the growing ability to manufacture and consume…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER93.6% of users find it useful
Urbanization: economic stratification
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Urbanization: economic stratification"

Download file to see previous pages The Industrial Revolution that began in 1700 has transformed the population, culture, and the geographical use of space as the world evolved to accommodate new forms of agriculture and was spurred by the growing ability to manufacture and consume. Along the way, several innovations and inventions contributed to the revolution that made it possible, if not mandatory, for people to reside in highly concentrated areas that became the hub of industrialization and commerce.By 1950 these urban areas had matured and aged into the modern model of urbanization. Along with the restructuring of the geography, the social and political structure was also transformed. "Urbanization is a two-way process because it involves not only movement from village to cities and change from agricultural occupation to business, trade, service and profession but it also involves change in the migrants attitudes, beliefs, values and behavior patterns (Urban growth and urbanization, 2006). While immigrants from Ireland, Germany, Italy, and Poland came together with the freed slaves to form large urban areas, they often failed to assimilate into a homogeneous group. In fact, the different cultural groups remained isolated and formed interdependent neighborhoods that were built around their specific ethnic or cultural needs. It is tempting to view the urban areas as the victims of cultural bias or racial prejudice. However, all these urban areas also had the issue of economics in common. The wealth that the migrants sought by marketing their labor in these industrialized areas was not realized as the urban areas became economically stratified and were excluded from the promise of the American middle class.
The urbanization process across the 250-year span of 1700-1950 was a gradual evolution based on the rising technology that was available at the time. In the early 18th century, mechanization was introduced into the workplace with inventions such as the loom for textiles. Work that had previously been accomplished in the home, or locally, was transferred to the new factories that were being built. Industrialization was transforming the concept of labor and altering the face of population centers and commerce. Work that had typically been done in the home was transferred to factories and labor became specialized. This was the initial stages of the definition of the value of labor and began the process of economic stratification. Among the first victims were women and children as in England, "Slop or sweated workers were disadvantaged by the industrial revolution, and those urban areas employing women involved irregular employment, long hours, and poor pay" (Nicholas and Oxley, 1993, p.739). Indeed, rather than improving the standard of living for the masses, the industrial revolution devalued the nature of work and the worker. This was reflected in the poorer quality diets of the urban workers as well as a deterioration of their overall health (Nicholas and Oxley, 1993, p.736). Isolation and a diminished well-being would characterize the revolution as people concentrated in urban areas to be near the employment opportunities. This new mechanization required a power source, which in this era was water. Waterpower would be used to turn the machinery and provide the necessary power for the new machines. This required that the factories be located near an adequate source of moving water. Factories were built along rivers and streams to capture the waterpower and attracted large numbers of workers to the area. The factories would attract workers from the area that settled near the factory and began the development of the new age of urbanization.
Three events in the middle of the 19th century coincided to permanently change the face of urban America. The end of the Civil War, the steam engine, and the railroad transformed the ability to locate factories near the raw materials and immigrant workers and expanded the marketplace with the ability to move products by rail. The demands of industry were the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Urbanization: economic stratification Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/macro-microeconomics/1513775-urbanization-economic-stratification
(Urbanization: Economic Stratification Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 Words)
https://studentshare.org/macro-microeconomics/1513775-urbanization-economic-stratification.
“Urbanization: Economic Stratification Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2000 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/macro-microeconomics/1513775-urbanization-economic-stratification.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Urbanization: economic stratification

Social stratification

...? Social Stratification SOCIAL STRATIFICATION Social is a key concept in social stratification. Social can be defined as a cultural or economic arrangement of groups in society. Social class also refers to a concept that centers on various models of social stratification where people are put together in groups of hierarchical categories of social standing with the main ones being lower, middle, and upper class. A social class refers to a set of persons who are in a similar position economically (Levine, 2010). In this system, their occupation is vital since it gives the persons benefits such as health care, stability, and fiscal rewards. People in similar social positions are aware of each other and get information regarding...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Gender stratification

...? Gender stratification Introduction Throughout history women around the world have taken a back seat in exercising various roles. It is worth noting that with for many years men tend to acquire more physical, social and status as compared to women especially in matters concerning education. As such, men are more aggressive in education matters and this has been the major reason behind men occupying most of the highly regarded prestigious offices. As often is the case, the inequalities often witnessed in work places and the education sector are blamed on sexism or male prejudice as well as, and the discrimination that is majorly based on gender. Sexism, as used in this context, refers to the situation in which men are seen as superior...
7 Pages(1750 words)Essay

Gender Stratification

...? Gender Stratification al Affiliations Gender Stratification Studies have shown that a variety of events which took place in the past have profoundly affected the gender roles in many societies. Today, the study of gender and gender roles in societies is emerging as the most significant trends in sociology studies. Currently, there are many sociologists who study the social events, patterns and interactions that help them in developing theories while explaining the reasons as to why they occur. The term gender stratification therefore, cuts across all aspects of social life and social classes. It also refers to men and women’s unequal access of prestige, power and property in the basis of their sex. Sociologists explain gender...
4 Pages(1000 words)Research Paper

Modern Urbanization

Practical applications precede the conceptualization and even the study of the interaction in the society.
There are different interactions in a community, as the world develops and become increasingly modern in the addition of different technologies, the complexity of the processes and interaction continuously intensifies. One of the most prevalent pattern and path of development of communities is urbanization.
Upon the development of communities and civilizations, the concept of urbanization emerged. In the study of the concept of urbanization, there are different impressions that are taken into consideration. These factors include the physical components, the environmental components, the inhabitants and the intera...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Stratification

... The Issues of Social Stratification Prejudices are inevitable in the society especially at present wherein peoplerecognize their differences. Probably the status in life is one of those that receive discrimination as people who live expensive lifestyles may think of those who cannot afford the same level of lifestyles as weak and petty people. Sometimes being judgmental cannot be easily avoided as people tend to categorize others just like what they do with other matters such as issues related to school or work. The tendency to categorize helps people in organizing their thoughts and the way they understand things, but it can easily go beyond the positive uses of categorizing to discrimination. Once categorizing is brought to the extreme...
4 Pages(1000 words)Term Paper

Stratification

... Due Stratification There are many ways that society can stratify its members, religion, gender, political views, ethnicity, social class, and, the most common, wealth or income. It is often the nature of society where certain people are inevitably the lesser paid skilled labor and others are the higher paid managers, supervisors, and owners. In these stratified segments of society, some will face predetermined glass ceilings that make their ability to achieve greater promotions and raises far less likely, while others will have all the opportunity in the world for better paying jobs and without limits or restrictions. Some say that stratification is a by-product of industrialization; simply meaning that in order to have a functioning...
1 Pages(250 words)Personal Statement

Urbanization

...Air Pollution and Urbanisation The world has been recording a significant growth both in economics and politics. Similarly, other aspects are improving over time, which includes technology, industrialisation and real estates. Apparently, this has led to an increase in the world population, reaching heights of over 7 billion people in the world. With an increase in population, there has been an immense need for employment and job opportunities. As a result, many people are finding it appropriate to reside in developed cities and towns. This has led to an increase in the number of people staying in towns, cities and significantly developing places. This had led to sprouting of skyscrapers and tall building to house the many people residing...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Urbanization

... Urbanization URBANIZATION Introduction The three narrators lived in early centuries and seem to have their view of urban cities of the modern era. They express themselves in hidden meanings that we must interpret if we were to understand what happens in urban centers. Thorough, their books, short stories and novels, they bring out the difficulties that are faced by individuals in cities (Baym, Franklin, Gura., Klinkowitz., Krupat, Wallace,2013). Thoreau chooses to live in Walden, a place that seems like a hiding zone from the rest of the population in the town. This best describes how persons isolate themselves from others in urban centers in the current days. Instead of living close to one another and forge closer ties, only separations...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Stratification

...Stratification Stratification Stratification is a societys categorization of individuals into socioeconomic groups called strata. In this case, stratification is based upon individual’s occupation, income, wealth, social status, and derived social and political power. As such, stratification is the comparative social position of an individual within a social category, group, and geographic region, Bryant (2009). According to the conflict theory, capitalist economy unfairly privileges the rich in the society, who have the power to manipulate and perpetrate an unfair system that operates to their advantage. In this case, Conflict theory applies to stratification because it holds that inequality adversely affects the society because it brings...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

Urbanization

... of many towns and cities (Gottdiener & Hutchison, 2011). The social problems that came up with urbanization have virtually persisted to date and this justifies why urbanization is still a topic worth considering in urban sociology. Owing to the increase in population in the cities, crime, pollution, violence among others became the order of the day. Today, these social problems are still widely felt across different societies despite the many efforts governments have made to curb them. Although, the sparkled economic engagements brought developments and growth in the cities, the social problems such as unemployment have remained a major challenge in the current society. This is attributed to the high population growth that the increased...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

The Economic Impact of the Emergence of China and India

The main macroeconomic variable that toys in the global economy’s shift are the emergence of India and China as new superpowers. This emergence certainly has a number of implications, but among the most relevant are: disruption of the equilibrium of the global economy which results in rising demand of goods, giving way to worldwide inflation; the attractiveness of outsourcing to these countries due to low cost but high talent workforce of these countries for cheaper operations.
The growing middle class of China and India results in booming demand for the automobile industry. This increase in demand, with the increasing purchasing power of these countries’ people, is not limited to automobiles but more apparent in...
10 Pages(2500 words)Assignment

Gross Domestic Product and the Nations Competency in Terms of Economic Welfare

It is often used to compare the economic performance to aid as a prediction tool and to analyze the business cycles and the recessive and expansive economic performances within them. This further aid economic and fiscal policy formulation of the government and is also used to analyze the consumer behavior and the economic phenomena involved. (Heakal, R. 2008).These figures can be a benchmark to compare economies of different nations and the economic prediction process is also made possible.

A usual pattern of assessing the Gross Domestic Product is to have an initial GDP report on every quarter which is an advance report. Two corrective reports follow this before the final figures on GDP are arrived at. It usually takes...
7 Pages(1750 words)Report

Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 and How It Has Impacted the Financial Markets

Though there were objections from various quarters about the huge amounts of tax payer’s money being used in the bailout of huge corporates, the Act has been successful in moving the downturn towards a flat point and now has started slowly moving towards a recovery stage. The various programs under the EESA 2008 have played a significant role in the financial sector, housing mortgage, and banking institutions to save the institutions from complete disaster.

The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act is a huge taxpayer bailout designed to rescue the financial sector. The amount of money to be used is around $700 billion or $2000 per American citizen (Public mark up). Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 is al...
10 Pages(2500 words)Research Paper

Economic Analysis of India

The country’s economy is fast growing with a stable political system that encourages foreign investment although with certain restrictions. The country generally has good energy, transport and communication systems which make the cost of doing business affordably.

The Republic of India found South of Asia is by far the world’s most populous democracy and ranks seventh largest in terms of geographical area (Brown, 1994). India is also the second most highly populated country in the world. The country has a rich culture with four major religions having originally emerged from it; Sikhism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. The Indian Republic consists of seven union territories and 28 states and ranks twelfth la...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

Bernard Madoff : A Scapegoat of the Economic Crisis

Darwin was condemned and treated with contempt by the Church for proposing the theory of evolution that linked all living matter in the earth, including humans. In the case of Bertrand Russell, he was imprisoned as a conscientious objector, for expressing his opposition to British participation in the First World War. These are typical examples of people being wrongfully punished when they were guilty of no crime or fraud or misdoing. It would be highly improper to associate Bernard Madoff with the aforementioned luminaries, for he was truly guilty of carrying out the biggest financial fraud in modern history. At the same time, it would be simplistic to classify him as a victim of the contemporary judicial system. The truth, in fa...
6 Pages(1500 words)Assignment

Economic Models: The Free Market and The State Owned System

The free market concept is mainly a theoretical concept as every country, even capitalist ones place some restrictions on the ownership and exchange of commodities (Free market economy). Therefore, the term free-market economy primarily means a system where the buyers and sellers are solely responsible for the choices they make. It gives the buyers and sellers the power to do business without being afraid of any regulations and intervention by the state. Hence, a free market gives the absolute power to prices to determine the allocation and distribution of goods and services (Free Market Economy). The pricing mechanism is in turn, driven by the forces of demand and supply of goods and services. Demand and supply of...
9 Pages(2250 words)Case Study

Economic Analysis on BMW Cars in the US Car Industry

Mini and the 1-series rapidly grew at a much higher rate through 2008. Since the early days of the new millennium, BMW has been one of the first automakers to utilize flexible factories in which more than one vehicle model could be produced at the same time. This enabled the company to meet shifts in market demand more effectively than BMW’s competitors could. BMW challenges to retain its market position in the international market for luxury cars. Many automakers, such as Hyundai with its Genesis sedan or Nissan's Infiniti brand are increasingly successful in realizing higher margins earned on luxury vehicles. BMW is rated behind luxury brands such as Lexus, Porsche, Mercedes, and Infiniti for these reasons

1. Th...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

International Business: World Economic Forum and Davos 2010

...Introduction Globalization, one of the most hotly debated issues means global capitalism to some while others consider it to be the continuation of modernism with the forces of wealth, progress, democracy and happiness at play (Kellner, 2002). Globalization is considered to be beneficial which promotes economic prosperity, cultural diversity and technological advancement. According to the critical social theory, technology and capital work together to create a new globalized and interconnected world. While each force of globalization is important, technological revolution has impacted the business models, value creation and differentiation (Spelman, 2010). The cloud computing technologies that have made the popular social networking...
7 Pages(1750 words)Coursework

Globalization and World Economic Forum at Davos 2010

...Globalization and World Economic Forum at Davos Forces Driving Globalization Globalization has resulted in enhanced interdependencies among thenations of unprecedented scale. This augmented interdependence has caused the dismantling of trade barriers and liberalization of markets. The forces of globalization have impacted the nations, the firms and the individuals alike with the prerequisite of liberalization of trade (Awuah, 2009). The seven forces of globalization are; Markets, Production, Culture, Labor, Technology, Environment and Liberalization. Of these factors, the globalization of markets has engaged substantial attention of the firms and the academia. Some markets are highly globalized, while some are not. The scale of market...
7 Pages(1750 words)Coursework

The 1846 Invasion into Mexico by the U. S.: The Political and Economic Forces that Brought about the Invasion

Some of the territories led to a war with Mexico from which the United States emerged victorious, expanding its territories and decisively establishing its dominance in North America.

President Andrew Jackson led an example of an administration that set the stage for the way in which James Polk would lead. In 1817, as a still yet military leader, Jackson led the United States into the first of three conflicts with the Seminole Indians from which the acquisition of Florida from Spain would be negotiated and finalized. The situation with Spain was tenuous and should have been dealt with in a diplomatic and cautious manner, but in 1817 President Monroe wrote a letter to General Jackson stating that “Great interests...
8 Pages(2000 words)Article
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Urbanization: economic stratification for FREE!

Contact Us