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The Sale of Goods Act - Case Study Example

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The paper 'The Sale of Goods Act' presents George who approaches Wahid’s warehouse, in order to purchase a car. A signboard, partly hidden by a tree, is placed near the warehouse, and it displays the message that the management assumed no responsibility for personal safety…
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The Sale of Goods Act
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Download file to see previous pages The goods purchased in contracts should be of satisfactory quality as established by Section 14(2) of the Sale of Goods Act. However, this statutory requirement is applied to goods sold in the normal course of the business. In addition, goods supplied in contracts should have satisfactory quality and should be reasonably fit for the purpose for which the buyer had bought them.
Goods supplied must conform to their original description made at the time of entering into the contract. These requirements benefit the buyer and the supplier will be held liable if these requirements are breached. Essentially, the Sale of Goods Act ensures that the goods supplied must be of satisfactory quality and this requirement applies to the sale of goods in the normal course of business (Section 14(2), Sale of Goods Act, 1979).
In our present case, Just two weeks after the purchase of the car, its computerized traffic navigation system failed to function and its petrol tank developed a hole. The Sale of Goods Act, in sections 14(2) and (3), requires goods sold to be suitable for the purpose for which they are sold and also to be of satisfactory quality.
Since the seller had infringed the implied terms that have been deemed to be essential conditions by the statute under the provisions of section 14(2) of the Sale of Goods Act 1979, he is liable for a claim of a full refund of the cost of the car subsequent to its rejection by George.
It has to be determined whether Wahid can rely on the exclusion clause to evade liability and whether George has any remedy to recover damages for the loss and personal injury caused to him due to one of Wahid’s employees, and also for the breakdown of the new car purchased from Wahid. George has to establish that the shop owner cannot rely on the exemption clause in the standard terms of the contract in accordance with the provisions of UCTA and UTCCR. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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