StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Battered Child Syndrome - Term Paper Example

Comments (1) Cite this document
Summary
A paper "Battered Child Syndrome" reports that the battered child syndrome is a type of abuse in which children are physically abused by caregivers. Physician C. Henry Kempe and his colleagues, in an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER92.4% of users find it useful
Battered Child Syndrome
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Battered Child Syndrome"

Download file to see previous pages Once Battered child syndrome is identified, ensuring the child's well-being is of vital importance. Despite a large number of reports that are being made, there is an abundance of research demonstrating that mandated reporters fail to report child abuse even when required and that there is considerable variability of reporting rates among professionals. The research indicates that there is a range of factors influencing reporting. Factors such as gender and education level of the reporter, fear of damaging the therapeutic relationship, the wording of reporting laws, and incomplete descriptions of what defines abuse have all contributed to discrepancies in reporting. Moreover, professionals often believe that the legal standard of reasonable suspicion is insufficient to demonstrate that abuse has occurred and therefore refrain from reporting. By 1967, almost all states had adopted some type of mandated child abuse reporting laws. These early laws were aimed primarily at physicians who came in contact with children in their medical practices. They served to help physicians identify possible abuse victims and established reporting procedures. These early laws were later expanded to include a variety of other professionals who have contact with children. The adoption of mandated reporting laws by the states was seen as one of the major contributors to the increase in identifying cases of child maltreatment. It also increased public awareness of the gravity and magnitude of child abuse (NACC, 2011)....
It also increased public awareness of the gravity and magnitude of child abuse (NACC, 2011). In 1974, the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) was passed by Congress, which established national definitions of child abuse and neglect. Under this act, individual states had to adopt the CAPT A definitions in order to receive federal funding for their child welfare programs. The funding provided states with new resources for investigation and prevention of child abuse. One significant part of the act was the creation of the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (NCCAN). This organization compiled data on child abuse as well as providing information about child maltreatment and prevention (NACC, 2011). In 1991, the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 was passed by Congress, and served to advance efforts to investigate and prosecute cases involving child maltreatment. This act has been amended over the years (NACC, 2011). Following the initial enactment of this statute, in 1997 the Adoption and Safe Families Act (AFSA) was passed in an effort to provide more timely and focused assessment and services for children and families. AFSA set the time limit for reunification of children removed from their families to one year in an effort to protect children and promote attachment with caregivers. Reporting Behavior Research has addressed a number of criticisms professionals have made regarding challenges to reporting child maltreatment. Research reported that, the vagueness of statutes, although legally permissible, decreases professionals' ability to make consistent determinations about whether or not abuse has occurred. This inconsistency and uncertainty contributes to a subsequent lack of confidence about ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Battered Child Syndrome Term Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/law/1436987-battered-child-syndrome
(Battered Child Syndrome Term Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 Words)
https://studentshare.org/law/1436987-battered-child-syndrome.
“Battered Child Syndrome Term Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/law/1436987-battered-child-syndrome.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (1)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
pr
predovicgeorge added comment 10 months ago
Student rated this paper as
Good paper! Used it to finish an assignment for a law course. It was easy as ABC, for the first time in my life.

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Battered Child Syndrome

Various Aspects Related To HIV and the Deadly Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

HIV is defined as the human immunodeficiency virus, as its infection causes a severe depletion in the host immune response. Its earlier names include HTLV (human T-cell leukaemia virus) type III, LAV (lymphadenopathy-associated virus), ARV (AIDS-associated retrovirus)(Pratt, 1995). The infection by this virus leads to a depressed immune state that the person becomes susceptible to infection caused by microorganisms that are otherwise the normal inhabitants of a healthy human body.

According to UNAIDS (2006) report, the total number of people in the world living with HIV infection has escalated to 39.5 million, which includes 2.5 million children. However, it seems that the disease is more severe in developing countries...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Intervention in Child Abuse

Since child abuse has been positively correlated to juvenile aggression and violence, early intervention and therapy become vital. In order to deal with this problem on a comprehensive basis, it is necessary that there is community support provided at local, state and federal levels, as well as support systems in schools for those individuals who are anti-social in their behavior. The prevention of anti-social behavior will depend to a great extent upon how effective the intervention process is and whether or not therapy is administered to victimized children early enough to arrest the degradation into anti-social behavior.

The purpose of this research study, therefore, is to examine existing intervention measures that...
9 Pages(2250 words)Research Proposal

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: How Alcohol Affects Infants and Children

While we know that alcohol negatively affects the child before birth, the exact biological and chemical process is still being studied (Day, 1992).

Classified as ICD-9 and ICD-10 under the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is a manifestation of permanent birth defects that are observed in the children of women who consume alcohol during pregnancy. As reported by Forrest and Florey (1991) as well as Day (1992), the level of consumption or the frequency of alcohol use while a woman is pregnant has an uncertain effect in the amount of damage that can be done to the fetus. Therefore, while the effects before birth are being studied, it becomes an importa...
6 Pages(1500 words)Term Paper

Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Peppermint Oil

Though IBS is rarely associated with any mortality, patients with irritable bowel syndrome often have a poorer quality of life due to its chronic, relapsing nature, increased morbidity and higher health care utilization than persons without the disorder. Although the cause of the disorder is not fully understood, manometric studies have shown that disordered bowel motility may be responsible for causing some of the symptoms. Diagnostic Criteria for IBS as described by Thompson et al (1999) is as follows:
conventional therapy, comprising of dietary changes like increasing dietary fiber intake, etc, and drugs such as anticholinergics, antispasmodics, and sedatives are often not significantly effective and may not be tolerated b...
14 Pages(3500 words)Case Study

Child Labor

The historical record of child labor statistics shows that child labor was at its peak in the USA in 1910. In 1880 there were 1,118,356 (or 16.5%) children between ten to fifteen years of age who were involved in strenuous physical work. In 1900 their number rose to 1,750, 178 (or 18.2%). In 1910 the number yet again rose to a record height of 1,990,225 or 18.4% (Fuller, 1923). Although the situation has improved a lot still even today America is not free from the evil of child labor. In a prosperous country like the USA, approximately 500,000 children work in the fields every day. These include children as young as five years old who work approximately 70 hours a week to support their families economically (Children in the Fields...
12 Pages(3000 words)Assignment

Polygamist Sects: Right of Religion or Child Abuse

In pre-industrialized societies, where the route to winning wealth and political power was through attracting followers of having lots of sons, to hunt for the family head or defend the family’s land. So, a man might marry several wives and have them produce goods that could be traded and generate income, and thus, polygamy is about hoarding the productive and reproductive labor of women.

The social implications of polygamy are more intricate and complex as there are obvious variations in the literature regarding the nature of relationships among co-wives in a polygamous marriage. It is also difficult to differentiate whether it is entirely good or is it entirely bad for women. The Mormons are an exceptional case...
9 Pages(2250 words)Term Paper

Maternal Employment and Child Well-Being

Through the course of history, it can be observed that the role of the female members of the population is continuously being leveled to that of the male, thus, in terms of the number of employees and organizational positions that are being held by women, the change is evident.  It can be considered that upon the achievement of the women to have equal opportunity to work and excel in the career of choice, the number of labor participation had increased. To be able to determine and present the objectives of the study, it is important to consider different issues that are related to the topic at hand. The main basis of the said notion is on the basis of different reasons such as in terms of the economic, family and social aspec...
12 Pages(3000 words)Literature review

Variety of Child Play Therapy

The need for the procedure had been stressed due to the abundance of children who had experienced trauma or even any form of neglect. The study then includes the victims of abuse, domestic violence and even lack of needed attention while the child is growing up. To be able to lessen such effects in the lives of the children, the said types of therapy are continuously developed (Barnes, p. 40).
There are different ways to be able to help a child. These constitute the provision of emotional care which can answer the needs of the child in different aspects most especially the emotional and behavioural facets. For example, the simple act of making sounds and having eye contact with another person during the period of infancy can...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

International Law: Child Soldiers

Using children to fight wars is not only morally abhorrent but very bad very the physical and mental health of the children in question. That is in part why a series of international laws and treaties have come into effect to try to deal with this scourge. But the issue is more complicated than that. While child soldiers are victims of war crimes, they too can also perpetrate serious breaches of the law of armed conflict. Under normal circumstances, individuals who commit such acts, be they combatants or not,2 would be vulnerable to prosecution. However, because children in such situations are victims as well as perpetrators and because of the special protections afforded to children under international law, many have questioned w...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

Child Genetic Engineering

Although this is a good move made by medical practitioners, too much use of this technology could end up doing more harm than good both medically and in the society. The process of children's genetic modification is in three steps; advanced reproductive technology, Chromosome manipulation, Genetics and Genomics (Baird 15). The study will relay more information on some of the negative effects that come alongside continuous genetic modification of children.
Studies show that genetic engineering in children plays a number of roles for instance apart from changing possible chronic diseases and disorders, the technique also enables a couple to bear a healthy child that is more athletic and attractive (Baird 15). The topic of genet...
8 Pages(2000 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Term Paper on topic Battered Child Syndrome for FREE!

Contact Us