StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Illicit drugs: Part 3 - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
How does the criminal justice system respond to ONE of the forms of crime addressed in the last part of the unit? …
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER91.3% of users find it useful
Illicit drugs: Part 3
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Illicit drugs: Part 3"

Download file to see previous pages The economic forces related to illicit drug prohibition increases the market price of these substances by forcing the trade underground, reducing supply, and increasing the amount of risk associated with distribution. The unregulated cash market surrounding the distribution and use of illicit drugs offers the promise of fast money to innumerable criminal entrepreneurs who profit off of the public use of the drugs despite the legal prohibition against them. Current drug policy suggests that a broad variety of recreational use of these substances is prohibited on greater public safety concerns. This policy attempts to address user demand issues through education programs, but these are largely accepted to have been unsuccessful in changing the social demand for illicit drugs popularly. The resulting criminalization of possession and distribution of illicit drugs then leads to a wider problem in prisons, such as incarceration for individuals guilty only non-violent crimes related to prohibition on a moral basis. This reflects the broader social debate as to whether or not it is truly the proper role of government to criminalize the use of illicit drugs through prohibition.

THE HISTORICAL PROHIBITION OF ILLICIT DRUGS IN AUSTRALIA

Most sources agree that Australia’s social problem with illicit drug use in the citizenry began in the early 1960’s and increased steadily to epidemic proportions. Australia’s problem with illicit drugs largely follows trends in the US, UK, Canada, EU, and other developed economies with the legal framework based in international agreements. The historical treaties that influenced Australia’s domestic illicit drug policy include (MacKay, 2001):
The First International Opium Commission (Shanghai Conference) of 1909 The Second International Opium Convention of 1925 The Convention for Limiting the Manufacture and Regulating the Distribution of Narcotic Drugs – Geneva, 1931 The Paris Protocol, 1948 The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961 The Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971 According to a special report prepared on Australian illicit drug policy for the Canadian Parliament, “The Paris Protocol 1948 ceded to the World Health Organization the power to determine which new drugs should be treated as ‘dangerous drugs’ for the purpose of the 1931 Convention. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs 1961 consolidated and further extended control over the international and domestic drug trades. It sought to limit the possession, use, trade, distribution, import, export, manufacture and production of drugs exclusively for medical purposes. It also combated drug trafficking through international cooperation. The Single Convention was instrumental in prompting a major rewriting, updating and extension of legislation at state level. The Convention on Psychotropic Substances 1971 further extended international controls to include a broad range of synthetic behaviour- and mood-altering drugs.” (MacKay, 2001) During the period of 1960 to 1970, the government largely was forced to develop new law enforcement approaches to drug use and distribution, which not only criminalized a portion of society, but also pushed drug use underground ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Illicit drugs: Part 3 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/law/1429261-3-how-does-the-criminal-justice-system-respond-to-one-of-the-forms-of-crime-addressed-in-the-last-part-of-the-unit-what-ar
(Illicit Drugs: Part 3 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 Words)
https://studentshare.org/law/1429261-3-how-does-the-criminal-justice-system-respond-to-one-of-the-forms-of-crime-addressed-in-the-last-part-of-the-unit-what-ar.
“Illicit Drugs: Part 3 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1750 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/law/1429261-3-how-does-the-criminal-justice-system-respond-to-one-of-the-forms-of-crime-addressed-in-the-last-part-of-the-unit-what-ar.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Illicit drugs: Part 3

The Roles of 3 Key Participants in the Property Development Process In Australia

Security is of primary concern to people living in new small townships that are mushrooming all over Australia under the impact of rapid urbanization and high-density population. While architects are seen taking a proactive role in property development, others are cutting across traditional routines and creating a new role for themselves as designer-developers.

Architects, property developers, and town planners here in Australia see the true picture of the international partnership developed between these three key players in property development abroad and are now trying to implement them here. Despite differences, these players are working in unison to create world-class infrastructures.
“The economic and d...
8 Pages(2000 words)Report

Tort Law of the United Kingdom: 3 Problem Questions

Trespass on land, goods, and person is altogether the most common type of tort, but in all cases, the main concern is the allocation of responsibility for whatever losses are sustained. For anyone party to be held responsible for violation of the tort law, the claimant must establish that there is a duty of care and that there has been a breach of that duty to cause damage or loss to the claimant that needs to be compensated by an award of damages. There is a breach of the duty-of-care principle if the defendant is proven to have failed to do what a reasonable person will do in the situation presented.

Francesca was a chambermaid of good standing at Hulton hotel until a regular hotel guest stormed into the manager&rsquo...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

The Abuse of Legal and Illegal Drugs

Some of the drugs, which are subjected to abuse, are legal drugs like tobacco, alcohol, prescription and over the counter drugs; and the proscribed drugs like cocaine, crack, ecstasy and LSD. Treatment for addiction should be commenced as soon as possible and the objective should be to restore normalcy in the life of the teenage addict. It is futile to adopt half measures or to ignore the problem. The sale of drugs either by prescription or over the counter has to be kept under strict surveillance. Teenagers constitute the future of the nation and it is incumbent upon adults to ensure that the former do not succumb to the lure of drugs.

Drug addiction is a disease that pertains to the brain. It can be cured by proper me...
12 Pages(3000 words)Term Paper

Causes of Illegal Drugs Consumption Among Women

... common illegal drugs applied by the women in their area. But banishment on its cultivation enhanced its illegal trafficking and it has become difficult to keep a check over access to it. “Although the ban closed down legal outlets for drugs, illegal availability and sale continued. (Mubeen & Sharif, 2007: p 3) The researchers declared too much restriction in opium cultivation as the most significant reason for illegal drug trafficking in Pakistan. The strengths of their research include focus on female gender, description of historical perspective, critical analysis of educational and domestic background. Exploration of most dominant issues i.e. unsuccessful marriages and negligence of parents is remarkable that forced women towards...
7 Pages(1750 words)Coursework

Drugs that Bind DNA to Treat Diseases

...Topic: Drugs that bind DNA to treat diseases (selected disease: cancer) Part A- (word count excluding the three citations = 459 The following keywords and keyword combination were used to search for articles on drugs that bind DNA to treat diseases: “Drug-DNA interactions AND cancer;” “DNA binding AND anti-cancer drugs” 2. To find articles on the given topic, PubMed Central was selected as the database for the search. Pubmed Central (PMC) is a digital archive or electronic storage of biomedical and life science journals of the U.S. National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health. It is a feature of the homepage of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). Pubmed Central has...
6 Pages(1500 words)Case Study

Intelligence and the War on Drugs

When the Ronald Reagan Administration initiated its famous War on Drugs program in the 1980s with the catchy slogan “Just Say No”, the focus of the program was not exclusively Mexico. At that time, different pockets of Latin America posed threats of varying degrees, including Columbia and Brazil. But due to its proximity to the United States, and the increase in demand for cocaine and marijuana, Mexico has emerged as the greatest threat in recent decades. Compounding the problem of drug trafficking is the internal political chaos in Mexico. The Mexican governments of past and present have tried various methods and tactics for bringing the drug cartels under control but to no avail. It is a reflection of the governments...
7 Pages(1750 words)Assignment

The Role of Smart Guns in Handling Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons Trafficking in Nigeria

There are those who obtain them without the knowledge of the top authorities. As such, there has been an increased rate of gun trafficking in most of the West African countries that include Nigeria. Such cases have been surrounded by a number of serious issues that include kidnapping and the killings of large masses of people. Because of this, it can always be assumed that the issue of smart guns is a disruptive element to the lives of individuals. However, in West Africa, the idea of smart guns has been understood to be a significant contribution to the handling of illicit small arms and light weapons (SALW). This action is taken alongside the treaties that have been developed in relation to the international arms trades. It is m...
17 Pages(4250 words)Research Proposal

The Legalization of Drugs

...Legalization of Marijuana: A Controversy Introduction Addiction of anything is wrong and harmful. The humans have a tendency to experience different types of addictive diseases along the span of their lifetimes because they are corporeal beings and therefore, they have the profound ability to derail from the lines of civic values that have a design to govern their matters of lives. The legal and religious values have the significant power to keep people on the right road. However, they might still be inclined to defy normal settings of their existence for the esteemed purpose of having fun. The activities of hard partying with cocktails and drugs is a norm in modern America (Thom, 418), but drug usage lasts for limited period of time...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

Characteristic of Omega-3 Fatty Acid

According to “Understanding the power of omega-3 (OP-ed)” by Tallmadge (2013) explains two most important of omega-3 fatty acids are known as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). They're usually found in a 50:50 or 60:40 ratio in fish. Also, we can find this in seafood. In other words, omega-3 fatty acids have many acids and the strong acids are DHA and EPA. According to “Benefits of Fish Oil and Marine-Derived Omega-3 Fatty Acids” written by Sigurdsson (2014) states that some fatty acids cannot be produced by a human body like omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and these fatty comes from food and called essential fatty acids. In other words, these fatty acids are very important and our...
12 Pages(3000 words)Research Paper

Should Cigarettes Be Considered As Drugs

...Should Cigarettes Be Considered As Drugs Should Cigarettes Be Considered As Drugs Introduction The term cigarette is used to refer to a small cylindrical shaped container that comprises of a huge number of ingredients that are rolled in a very thin paper for the purpose of smoking. An individual who smokes a cigarette tend to ignite one end of the cigarette and bristle the contents of the cigarette from the other end. Cigarettes are quite similar to drugs and carry various elements and cause various outcomes that take place as a result of drug consumption (Barceloux, 2012). Similar to cigarettes, drugs may even be smoked and may comprise of several ingredients such as nicotine, methanol and other chemicals. Drugs are those elements...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Illicit drugs: Part 3 for FREE!

Contact Us