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Modernization of the World - Essay Example

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The paper "Modernization of the World" explores the effects of modernization in the 19th and 20th century. Modernization had both positive and negative impacts on the world’s political, social, and economic affairs. Modernization always refers to irregular development that allows some groups…
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Modernization of the World
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"Modernization of the World"

Download file to see previous pages Eventually, leisure became less influential, with most corporations giving their employees off in particular days to enjoy leisure. In other words, the world became a working nation as people struggled to expand their wealth base.
Modernization did affect basic institutions as well. First, education became a serious concern because individuals needed to pass intelligence and stories from one generation to another. Schools developed ranging from lower level kindergartens to higher levels institutions of learning. Additionally, disciplines of study changed to cover many fields. For instance, psychology, law, engineering, and social arena expanded their subjects of study. Increasingly, the 20th century saw a link between the level of education and career that individuals pursued. Still, the family views on marriage because people assumed different roles. As more females entered the labor market and educated themselves, they became stable. Most women could raise children without necessarily having the support of male. Eventually, the concept of single mother became standard as professionals proved not keen on marriage. Some men and women preferred taking responsibility of their families as couples by sharing responsibilities but not based on traditional gender-oriented platforms. For instance, men and women could contribute equally to creating family wealth and shared duties at home equally. In fact, it was during the same period that feminism concepts became famous because women demanded equality on nearly all fronts. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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