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Modern Japan and Meiji Restoration - Essay Example

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The Japan people believed that Meiji just signified reshuffling of power and that much could not be done since the samurai class would still enjoy…
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Modern Japan and Meiji Restoration
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Download file to see previous pages The Charter Oath, which was promulgated made very democratic and great pledges that would see Japan people being involved in decision making regardless of their social status as well as embracing the natural law of nature. This was a very important step made by the Meiji in transforming Japan people and putting them ready for new improved Japan (Goto-Jones 42-46).
Privileges introduced were absolutely different and were meant to propel Japan into a civilized system of governance. Meiji Restoration was driven by the need to create a very powerful nation with strong political structures that could not be humiliated by the Western powers simply because their system of governance was exotic compared to the Westerners’. The new administration wanted the Western powers to respect Japan and treat them as equal partners and as a way of reducing humiliation brought about by unequal treaties. Influence on demands of foreign powers was imminent in Japan and therefore it was significant for japan to institute strong legal and political system (Goto-Jones 42-46).
Indeed, the new government fought tirelessly to stop cultural imperialism that was imposed by the Western powers and in the end, treaties were renegotiated after riots and protests in Japan. Japan now had a formal constitution that governed them and there was evidence of imperial power in Japan. They even managed to organize a civilized military power, which was used in defeating powerful China (Goto-Jones 42-46).
Generally, the reforms in Japan during Meiji Restoration were as a result of both domestic and international pressures. The regime was pressurized to form their own state because of the powerful foreign forces, which they were not pleased with. Yes, there was need to remain an independent state and this was even part of the Tokugawa project. Traditional Japanese injustices and the ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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