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Depression as a Mental Disease - Essay Example

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This essay "Depression as a Mental Disease" deals with the problems connected to the mental illness of depression. As the author puts it, depression is one of the most common mental health issues which humans have been known to experience.  …
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Depression as a Mental Disease
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Download file to see previous pages The social and cultural issues that need to be considered include the demands placed on teenagers and young adults to be socially engaged. To John, having his girlfriend break up with him may have caused him embarrassment and shame; likely making him an outsider among his friends who may have girlfriends or boyfriends they can hang out with. The social pressures also relate to the demand to engage in alcohol, drugs, or cigarette-smoking, as well as to maintain a certain weight. Within the cultural context, the problem does not indicate the cultural background of John. However, it is important to note that culture plays a significant part in the management of mental health issues. Some cultures may not have a welcoming attitude for mental health illnesses. They may consider it a taboo in their culture to manifest symptoms of mental illness and such factor may prompt depressed patients do not seek help for their symptoms.
John is being supported by his mother. She is the one who has become very concerned about his change of behavior and who is making the effort to have him be seen by a mental health professional. Should the time come when John would be formally diagnosed with a mental health illness, she would likely continue to support him throughout his recovery process? Without a strong support system, which may come in the form of family and friends, the depressed patient would likely never recover from her depression and worse, may successfully commit suicide (Theofilou, 2012).
The support system can help draw the person out of his depressed mood, and gradually interest them into taking part in their usual activities again (Theofilou, 2012). ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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