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Single Parent - Essay Example

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This is the "Single Parent" essay. Single parenthood has a lot of challenges because of limited time, material, and financial support…
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Download file to see previous pages Notably, children raised in those households lack attention, love, and support from both parents, unlike other families. The majority of families with a single parent are often unstable because it may have been caused by divorce, death, or unmarried couples. For one to be considered a single parent in this context, their children should be aged below 18 years. Understandably, these families need aid more than any other, which has raised debate over some time whether the assistance offered to them is enough. Also, people need to change their perception of children raised by single mothers or fathers. Raising a child depends on the disciplinary structure and guidance offered by the father or mother. So, they also have better chances of becoming good citizens like other children when raided up by both parents. They also have the potential to develop progressive emotional, behavioral, and social skills like any other child with time. Today, society has developed hard immunity to the sufferings of single parents. It is never a shared responsibility, where children raised according to the norms of the society by all people, but an individual duty. Fortunately, these children have also learned to cope and develop emotional strength, regardless of parenthood's nature. Despite the developments, parents still go through a lot to ensure they maintain the balance so that children don't feel the hole left in the family. Mostly, sole mothers or fathers have to work double to provide for the children and still manage to find time to make the family happy. Some do not even have decent jobs, but they manage to cope regardless of the difficulties. Many have tried, but the quality of parenting is still lacking. They either work for longer hours and share little time with their children or provide too little to meet the family needs. Luckily, studies have shown solid parenting has nothing to do with the parents' number but quality parenting. For instance, children raised by an employed single parent are more mature and independent than their counterparts. Mostly, the kids take responsibility from a young age because they must think for themselves while the parent is away. Some parents also work late into the night, and these children have to take control, including doing assignments and preparing their beds.  For older children who live with their siblings, they have the most responsibilities because they are the leaders while the parent is away for work. The upbringing prepares them to deal with every situation they encounter and gain experience in making important decisions. Notably, it seems like a blessing in disguise become these children learn to become more mature and independent with time. Although children from households with a single parent tend to acquire basic survival skills or become independent faster, they risk developing unconventional behavior. Mostly, the behavior requires some authority that can only be enforced by parents and teachers. If the environment back at home is toxic or uncontrolled, single-parent children tend to miss critical behavioral ethics. The emotional attention that children with the mum and dad receive is far better than the single-parent kids get from their mum or dad. Perhaps, it would also affect how the single-parent child relates to others and progress in life. Nevertheless, children with both parents are no better, especially if the family experiences constant domestic violence. A child who experiences violence in the family would also likely become violent when they grow up. Therefore, it seems one is better than two if you consider the violence factor in your arguments.  After all, the belief that emotional support and behavioral transformation is only possible if both parents are present is bias. Nevertheless, some research has supported the notion that children need both parents to get the full emotional and behavioral skills. For instance, the article "Single-Parent Cause Juvenile Crime" alleges that children with single-parent backgrounds tend to have behavior problems when they become adults. It attributes the behavior problems to inadequate attention by the parent and economic insecurities. Nevertheless, there is no substantial evidence to suggest single-parent background contributes to most criminals in society. The author fails to highlight the plights of these households, which subject them to such prejudices. Although the disadvantaged single parent has several commitments, they still spare some time for their kids to model them into responsible people in the future. There are several testimonials of single mothers or fathers who have managed to raise their children to become prominent people in the community. However, a few could go astray, which is the typical nature of humans because children raised by both parents can also become criminals. Although it seems impossible for sole mothers or fathers, it can be done. A single-parent setup that values love and acceptance is an ideal environment to model well-behaved children. It is far better than a full family with constant arguments and bitterness, which provides a toxic environment to raise rebellious kids. Research has shown that most relationships become toxic after the first five years, which results in emotionally unstable kids who live in fear. If the couples fight regularly, then the child should live with one parent rather than two. On the contrary, children brought up by a sole parent who motivates them to develop a sense of self-worth, belonging, and love to improve their quality of life. They also tend to develop good behavioral instincts both at school and at home. So, single-parent status should never be used to victimize such families. Every child should enjoy being raised in a single-parent home as other ordinary families do regardless of their economic status. People should understand that not every family is lucky to have both parents. Therefore, we should embrace them and offer whatever support we can get towards raising their kids. It could be intangible or tangle benefits because they all help the family feel loved and appreciated. The government has also established programs to aid single-parent groups in meeting their financial obligations. They include child care support and other subsidies that enable them to take their children to school. However, the government has to do more to facilitate services offered to single parenthood families. The help needs to be substantial to relieve the family of many responsibilities like working late hours to bring a meal to the table. They also need the time to express affection and moral support to their children. Besides, they should also get the chance to raise kids that would become responsible people when they grow up. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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