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Commercialization of organ transplants - Essay Example

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Commercialization of Organ Transplants Date Organ transplant refers to the act of surgical removal of an organ from a donor for translocation into the recipient’s body. This is aimed at restoring the proper functioning of the donor body where some of the key organs have ceased to function effectively (Kanniyakonil 2005, p.78)…
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Commercialization of organ transplants

Download file to see previous pages... This however has resulted in the emergence of a heated debate with some people supporting this move while others strongly opposing it. This scenario has been brought about by ethical issues which surround the entire process of the organ transplant and their respective sale. This paper will seeks to expound upon both side of the debate and highlight why commercialization of transplants should be discouraged. To start with, the organs under transplant are priceless and in most cases are donated as a humane gesture. They are a gift from our creator that were never commercially acquired. This however has been countered by the proponents of commercialization that being reliant on altruism to acquire these organs has resulted in failure to meet their high demand. This has resulted in the death of many patients who could only have survived from such procedures (Talbot, D’Allessandro & Muiesan 2010, p.31). In addition, commercialization has impeded the acts of donating cadavers and the development of requisite programs. This has been countered by the claim that live transplants are only used to supplement the organs acquired from the cadavers. The difference that comes in between the two is about who is the actual beneficially after the organ transplant. ...
cases of organ transplants which only unfairly brand them as rich harvesting zones (Kanniyakonil 2005, p.202) In addition the payment done for this organ is not reminiscent of their real value. This makes it appear as a cosmetic exercise, a well-calculated move to blind the vulnerable in the society from the reality. Attaching any value to the organs is an unethical process since they are invaluable. This has been countered by the claim that prohibition would only deny the poor the chance to make quick money for a noble cause. This would not in any way help their financial situation nor benefit the recipient; thus, the proponents claim it to be a win-win situation for both of them. Additionally, commercialization would only fuel instances of human trafficking which would put the donor in a risky situation. There also have been cases of where corrupt medical practitioners harvest not only one but all the organs leading to the demise of the donor. Furthermore, the conditions during the performance of the transplant would be very poor and further risk the life of the trafficked donor. To counter this, the proponents have made use of statistics that the risk attributed to kidney transplant is approximately 0.03%. Commercialization would be an insult to the financially unstable in the society. This would widen the gap of inequity since only the rich would afford these commercialized organs. This denial of organs accessibility would erode the principle of justice which is a basic ethical practice. The proponent of this cause however argues that the centralization of all organs donated would create equitable allocations based on social or medical need. This will bypass the notion that the very best goes to the highest bidder. Therefore, the sale of organs should not be ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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