We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Nobody downloaded yet

Challenging Shakespeare's Hegemonic Position in the Literary Canon - Essay Example

Comments (0)
Summary
In this paper I shall be endorsing the position that Shakespeare rightly enjoys the position of hegemony that has been accorded to him in the English literary canon, cemented by his reputation as a dramatist and a poet over centuries. Shakespeare is perhaps the most influential writer of all times and the importance give to him can be gauged in a way by the emphasis given to his texts even today, be it from high schools, colleges or universities, to television or cinema adaptations or even as examples of fine writing…
Download full paper
GRAB THE BEST PAPER

Extract of sample
Challenging Shakespeare's Hegemonic Position in the Literary Canon

Download file to see previous pages... 805). Interestingly, Shakespeare himself was alive during this period. The term ‘literary canon’ is however, far older and was originally used in the context of the books of the Bible that were deemed genuine and possessing authority, but whose meanings were later expanded to include other writings. This literary canon now includes works by Shakespeare, Wordsworth, Dickens, Dante, and all such authors who are seen to be writers of the classics and worthy of serious academic attention. Writers who have been given canonical status are generally celebrated names with universal acclaim (Stevens, 2007). It is true that Shakespeare holds a hegemonic position within the literary canon, but it is not without reason. It can be justified in many ways. To say that he had creative writing ability would be an understatement seeing the enormity of his written work - drama or poetry - and the consistency that he maintains in his writing throughout. Shakespeare’s popularity can also quite simply be attributed to his enormous popularity among lovers of literature over the four centuries following his death and that popularity beyond generations alone validating and cementing his reputation as one of the best if not the best dramatist of all time. A point to be kept in mind is that the rise in Shakespeare's popularity to the reaches of being called 'hegemonic' is a phenomenon that started to occur after his death and not during his lifetime. This lends more credence to the fact that sheer popularity among his audience has more to do with why Shakespeare is the subject of this paper. That raises the question of 'What is the reason of Shakespeare's universal appeal?'. And truly it is an intriguing question because it brings one to contemplate over the reasons how an unknown country boy from Stratford-upon-Avon, poor and poorly educated according to the standards of his age arrives at the great city of London and goes to work at odd jobs in a theater. In a year or two he is associated with scholars and dramatists, the masters of their age, writing plays of kings and clowns, of gentlemen and heroes and noble women, all of whose lives he seems to know by intimate association. . . Play after play runs from his pen, mighty dramas of human life and character following one another so rapidly that good work seems impossible; yet they stand the test of time, and their poetry is still unrivaled in any language. (Long) If we look at the age in which Shakespeare was writing, we learn that he was not the sole progenitor of the age's literary vitality on the stage. A star in his own right, Shakespeare shared the sky with others like Ben Jonson and Francis Beaumont among whom Beaumont happened to be the first dramatist who was honored with a burial in Westminster Abbey while Shakespeare was relegated to the obscurity of Stratford-upon-Avon, his hometown. (Jokinen) There are many reasons for Shakespeare's massive appeal but primarily it appears that Shakespeare's continued popularity has been due to the continued availability of his texts over the centuries and due to their adaptability. The first instance ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Challenging Behavior
The British Education system and the Department for Education of the United Kingdom have initiated many policies regarding challenging behaviour in the nation. In this essay, various current policies and theories underlying these policies will be analysed and critically evaluated.
14 Pages(3500 words)Essay
A Literary review of William Shakespeare's play Othello
Willliam Shakespeare’s play Othello tells the tale of two important men who are supposed to be friends, but in fact are both victims of their own emotions and a certain moral weakness. Iago is portrayed as the villain of the piece, and Othello, who gives his name to the play, is a sort of tragic hero.
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Challenging behaviour

The author states that the causes of challenging behaviours include but are not limited to attention-seeking, severe autism, traumatic brain injury, opposition defiant disorder, communication difficulties, socio-economic disadvantages, dysfunctional families and schools, conduct disorder, and child temperament.

9 Pages(2250 words)Essay
Challenging Behavior
Challenging Behavior Challenging behavior can be defined as culturally abnormal behavior of such force, regularity or extent that the wellbeing of the individual or others is expected to be in somber jeopardy, alternately, it can also be considered as behavior that is likely to acutely curtail use of, or result in the person being denied access to, ordinary community facilities (Emerson and Einfeld, 2010.p.8).
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay
Hegemonic Masculinity
In education, there has been much talk of boys' failure in school and the need for special education for boys (Connell 1996, Gilbert and Gilbert 1998). In health, there has been increased debates regarding men's health (Sabo and Gordon 1995, Schofield et al.
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay
Canon Law & 8th Amendment
Amendment VIII (the Eighth Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the U.S. Bill of Rights, prohibits excessive bail or fines, as well as cruel and unusual punishment. The phrases employed are taken from the English Bill of Rights.
15 Pages(3750 words)Essay
Shakespeare's Tragidy
According to that illustrious philosopher, there are six major elements required to make up a tragic hero. To begin with, these heroes (or heroines) must have a noble stature, although they don’t necessarily have to be royalty. They are also
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay
Strategic planning at Canon
2. Debate whether companies outside this industry sector can draw any useful lessons from the strategies used by Canon in this industry. Provide examples of strategic areas that might be of interest to other industries and any
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay
Canon Case Study
According to Andrew (1997:52), corporate strategy is the pattern of decisions that guide an organisation’s activities to reveal the principal objectives purposes and resources. In other words it refers to the range of
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay
Literary canon
Since the cannon apply a particular level of validity when classifying an artwork, they help in selecting the best quality work of a lifetime to prevail. I think the field of
1 Pages(250 words)Assignment
Let us find you another Essay on topic Challenging Shakespeare's Hegemonic Position in the Literary Canon for FREE!
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us