Nobody downloaded yet

Students' Rights to Their Own Language - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Since time immemorial, the number of immigrants entering the United States of America has grown tremendously. Some are native English speakers while others speak Spanish, French, Germans, among other languages…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER97.8% of users find it useful
Students Rights to Their Own Language
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Students' Rights to Their Own Language"

Download file to see previous pages Considering America is an English-speaking nation, the language of teaching, writing and giving any education instruction is preferably English. Immigrant Parents advocate for their children to learn the English language because it is the language of opportunities in America, where they reside (Goode Web). They argue that teaching the students in their native languages will jeopardize the student’s chances in the job market where the English language is dominant. This notion is however, facing criticism with some parties arguing that students should reserve the right to their own patterns and varieties of language while writing their academic work. Therefore, there have been arguments and counter arguments for and against the policy statement adopted by the National Council of Teachers of English in 1974, Students Right to Their Own Language. This paper briefly discusses pros and cons of National Council of Teachers of English policy on language and then supports the statement. The use of one’s language in communication is a complicated phenomenon. The way we speak and the way we write our academic works is largely different. In recent times, uniformity manifests between the two although much success is in the offing in accommodating communication in diverse dialects as proposed in the statement. The use of the written English faces criticism from the inclusive American minorities who have proposed a shift from this norm. A dialect is a language used by a defined group of people. The diversity in dialects is because of different age or educational groups that people belong (CCCC 5). As such, most speakers profess more than one dialect, which pose a great challenge to America’s education sector. Since a dialect closely relates to a culture, accepting a new dialect is like accepting a new culture and the reverse is true. Thus, switching a dialect is a complicated issue. A rejection of any dialect in favor of the American dialect is an act of discrimination and exertion of dominance over less prevalent dialects. Indeed, the success of any speaker cannot be defined by dialect. Undeniably, the right to student’s native dialects deserves respect. Additionally, as individuals tend to maturity, they incline to their language patterns, which are difficult to change (CCCC 7). In fact, the idea of forcing an adolescent to learn the Standard English dialect is a hard assignment that might work against them while competing with students who are naturally fluent in the English language. For the purposes of fairness, the students should use their own dialect in academic work. Similarly, no dialect is good to dismiss others in general use. Therefore, the plural student society will require multiple languages to address the education curriculum needs. Another challenge that resides in the Edited American English (EAE) is the ability to write. The EAE requires a lot of precision in writing, spelling, punctuations, and interpretation. It warrants competence to learn how to speak and write a different dialect fluently. Hence, students should use the dialect they are fluent in speaking, writting, and interpreting in their academic work. Additionally, the dialect that students use in reading does not affect the interpreted meaning of any piece of an academic work since reading involves decoding the meaning and not decoding the utterances (CCCC 9). Hence, the adoption by National Council of Teachers of English in 1974, on the Students Right to Their Own Language, was relevant (NCTE Web). To achieve ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Students' Rights to Their Own Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/english/1444413-students-rights-to-their-own-language
(Students' Rights to Their Own Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
https://studentshare.org/english/1444413-students-rights-to-their-own-language.
“Students' Rights to Their Own Language Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/english/1444413-students-rights-to-their-own-language.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Students' Rights to Their Own Language

Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities

...?Legal Rights with Disabilities Legal Rights with Disabilities God has created every individual with a difference. There are some people around us who has some disabilities and they need special care and attention during their education. There are some special requirements from special children and students. Special education is the education requires by special children or disables persons. The type of education requires planned and monitored teaching processes. The type of teaching needs special teaching skills and special material for people who have disabilities. The IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) is a U. S federal law deals with the process that how special...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities

...? Legal Rights with Disabilities IDEA The provision of adequate legal rights to the with disabilities always remains an important issue and great concern for the common people and policy makers. In this regard, an important landmark was achieved when the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was passed in 1975. The act clearly describes the legal rights of the students with disabilities through its principles and procedures and clearly demonstrated the intentions of the government to safeguard the rights of students with disabilities through providing legislative shield (http://idea.ed.gov/). IDEA has widely been regarded as...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities

...? Legal Rights with Disabilities Task: Health experts may define individuals with disabilities as those persons who possess physical or mental impairments, which significantly limit them from the key life activities. From this definition, it is clear that these individuals need exceptional care, and it is their lawful right to receive such care. Moreover, they lawfully merit individualized education. As such, this paper will look into the legal strategies followed to refer a student with an apparent impairment for appraisal and final placement to the right institutions. In 1975, Gerald Ford, the then president of the U.S., signed “The Individuals with Disabilities...
5 Pages(1250 words)Term Paper

Should Animals Have Their Own Rights

...Should animals have their own rights? INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND Alan Holland’s exploration of animal rights is characteristic with richness and depth, while many times being called in, by disputes or practical problems. Instead of focusing on the emphasis of environmental pragmatism or the significance of harmonizing practice and theory, Holland forces his audiences to serve basic philosophical questions, while at the same time resolving the real problems facing environmental policy (Singer 75). The two central areas of focus in Holland’s work include the relations existing between the normative and the natural, as well as the ways in which the duties of individuals to animals go hand...
10 Pages(2500 words)Essay

Diversity, legal rights of students

...education and related services should have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Each IEP should be designed for one student and should be an absolutely individualized document. The IEP channels the delivery of special education services and supports for the student with a disability (La Venture, 2003). 3) Evaluations for special education. It should involve more than a single process, be nondiscriminatory, be done in a child's primary language, arranged by qualified multidisciplinary team, and tailored to gauge particular areas of need (La Venture, 2003). 4) Federal financial assistance. It will be given to local and state governments that provide full educational opportunities to...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Diversity, legal rights of students

...services should have an Individualized Education Program (IEP). Each IEP should be designed for one student and should be an absolutely individualized document. The IEP channels the delivery of special education services and supports for the student with a disability (La Venture, 2003). 3) Evaluations for special education. It should involve more than a single process, be nondiscriminatory, be done in a child’s primary language, arranged by qualified multidisciplinary team, and tailored to gauge particular areas of need (La Venture, 2003). 4) Federal financial assistance. It will be given to local and state governments that provide full educational opportunities to...
5 Pages(1250 words)Essay

Language Difficulties Of Foreign Students

...Language Difficulties Of Foreign Students Truth be told, it is a bit difficult for me to view myself as a writer because English is not my primary language. I am a native Spanish speaker so I find myself struggling to get my thoughts and ideas down on paper in English. Added to this problem is the fact that in Venezuela, where I hail from, the classes do not require the students to write any essays. While in the United States, essay writing is very important to the learning process of the student. Although I informed my teachers of my learning difficulties, they did not seem to care that I was struggling in class because of my lack of English...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

What is social Justice How is social justice related to language rights What do you think about language rights and deaf students

...free elections. During state discussions, the minority groups may suffer if the government insists discussions be carried out in the national language. Foreign language is what is often used to teach the children of the minority. Consequently, the children grow to forget their language and their culture in addition. Higher rates of school drop-outs and unemployment rates also follow the children. In the colonial days, the white people wanted to teach the black people children their language but the chiefs realized that it was only robbing their children of their language and culture (Skutnabb-Kangas, 2008, P.3). Deaf students are a...
2 Pages(500 words)Assignment

Compare medieval students with your own student life

...and as such had it thinly disguised as some form f philosophy (Kenny, 56). This essay therefore seeks to discuss medieval philosophy giving comparison and contrasts between the medieval students and my own student life. Medieval students were expected to act within the doctrines of Christianity. This was the philosophy that required an individual student to take responsibility for the evil conducted. Medieval philosophy talks about free will and the choices people make about what they do and priority over what should be made superior over the other (Kenny, 62). As such students conduct and actions were expected to be guided by this...
5 Pages(1250 words)Research Paper

National Identity and Language Rights

...and these decisions tend to be uncontroversial. These are the states where the legislatures have passed these laws. In more ethnically diverse states and municipalities, the legislatures have tended not to pass these laws, but the people, by their own initiative, tend to pass English language amendments (Citrin, 1990, p. 540). This is especially true in populations where there is a high proportion of non-English speakers, and high rate of Hispanic and foreign-born population (Citrin, 1990, p. 541). This movement is not limited to legislatures, however. It is also tacitly enforced by English as a Second Language (ESL) classrooms. These classrooms may forbid the...
7 Pages(1750 words)Research Paper
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Students' Rights to Their Own Language for FREE!

Contact Us