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Indigenous Education in Australia - Case Study Example

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This case study "Indigenous Education in Australia" focuses on Australian educational project that demonstrates the best practice by meeting the strategies urbanized in the recently released National Aboriginal plus Torres Strait Islander Strategy for Vocational Education plus Training. …
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Indigenous Education in Australia
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Download file to see previous pages As an effect of broad community conversation and research, the Northern Territory Correctional Services (NTCS) in Australia documented that the wants of together the illegal and the community could be the majority outstanding addressed during an integrated approach to meddling and training delivery. Furthermore, ending offending our message was the resultant proposal and it was officially launched in September 1999 (Heath, A.F. and Ridge, J. 2003, 169-84). This project focuses on as long as skills that are the majority suitable to the location and lifestyle of the person. The policy requires an ongoing dialogue among the program facilitator, training supplier, the member and his or her home community. No doubt, such education provides a focus for interference that ranges from matter abuse to community preservation. There are no additional education-based institutions that provide the framework for training delivery, community involvement and participation (Harkness, S. 2005, 1-36). Comparable training programs delivered within the custodial context are characterized by compartmentalization and limited opportunities for evolution. This program is designed to accommodate the changing needs of individual participants as well as the needs and expectations of the community. Sales of artwork and music generate an income that is given to the Victims of Crime Assistance League in line with the agency committed to providing reparation (Daly, P. 2004).
extra than 250 male as well as female inmates in Darwin in addition to Alice Springs correctional centers at present are concerned in this program, on behalf of 25 percent of the total prison inhabitants in the Northern Territory (NT) of Australia. Moreover, participants are creating stories, paintings, songs and music CDs that speak to an alcohol and drug use and criminal. This product is a marketplace via the Web site. The content of much of the music and artwork reflects the choices made by offenders prior to imprisonment, the effect of their crimes on victims and the realities of prison life. all through this "world first" proposal, participants undertake countrywide attributed Vocational Education plus Training (VET) in areas such as literacy, music and art manufacturing skills, computing, woodwork and trades (Heath, A.F. and McMahon, D. 2005). ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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