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Inclusion of Disabled Children in Primary Education - Essay Example

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Education is the process through which individuals at different levels in the course their lives, acquire knowledge, skills and information that help them perform different economic and non economic activities towards the improvement of the society. The process of learning entails the giving instruction to the student, the instruction are given through training and by competent teachers…
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Inclusion of Disabled Children in Primary Education
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Download file to see previous pages This education consists of six or seven years. The children enrolled in primary education are of the age of five or six years. According to UNESCO (UNESCO, 1994) almost 70 % of the children enroll for primary education. This report also suggests that most governments in all parts of the world are ready to archive a full universal enrollment of all children in primary schools by the year 2015.
Disability is defined as an impairment, which can be either physical or mental that limits a human being from performing activities performed by an ordinary person. The Disability Discrimination Act(DDA) defines disability as a mental or physical limitation that has substantial long term negative effect on the person and limits his/her ability to perform day to day duties. With respect to this definition; substantial indicates that the disability can be minor or major. Long term means that its effects can last for one year minimum, the activities that the disabled person is unable to perform include but not limited to speech, hearing, sight, manual work, movement and reasoning power.
According to research conducted by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), the areas affected by disability include; performance of general task, communication impairment, limited or no mobility, lack of self care, limited learning ability, inability to carry out domestic function, inability for relationship with other people and the community as a whole. some of the most common disability among human being include; deafness, which is the inability to hear, blindness which is the inability to see, lameness which is the inability to walk or perform other physical tasks and mental retardation or cognitive disability which is the inability to reason or solve problems normally.
According to a report by UNESCO (UNESCO, 1994) the implementation of inclusive education would be more advantageous to the disabled children in the long run. The report highlights that the inclusion of the disabled children will lead to the enhancement of a cooperative spirit between the disabled children and the other students. This will help the other students to accept the disabled children as part of the society. The other children will also help them in adapting to the ordinarily system of learning. Implementation of inclusive education is considered to be beneficial to all the children in the long run, initially the disabled children may feel a little different from other kids, but with time the children accept their differences. The children with disability will also run how to tolerate and accept each other differences.
Special schools
These are schools, specially designed and staffed with specially trained and experienced tutors in order to cater for education needs of disabled children. In these schools the student are given high attention and the teacher. The student- teacher ratio is less than 6:1. In addition, these students have special facilities e.g. sensory rooms, special swimming pools and other facilities that aid these children develop, learn, play and interact with each other. Some of these special schools include; school for the blind, school ...Download file to see next pages Read More
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