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Principles of Effective Practice in the Teaching and Assessment of Reading - Essay Example

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The paper "Principles of Effective Practice in the Teaching and Assessment of Reading" discusses that some researchers have identified the requirement of additional skills beyond reading and comprehension. They suggest the use of integrated skills in order to arrive at appropriate conclusions…
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Principles of Effective Practice in the Teaching and Assessment of Reading
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Download file to see previous pages The instructors should seek to motivate and stimulate the learners to work at optimum levels. Information should be processed and developed inside the brains of students. Vocabulary is slowly built up in order to ensure that they have obtained exposure to the various language patterns and structures. The final stages of reading involve the ability of students to form complex words and phrases. They are able to decipher the meaning of the text. They can apply outside knowledge in order to obtain an outline of the text. Empirical studies have demonstrated that a staged approach towards reading can produce benefits for young children. It helps to generate interest and passion for young children. It leads to commitment and devotion to reading acquisition skills. Further reading helps to enhance the cognitive and intellectual capacity of young students. Finally, it exposes them to vast literature that can help them achieve educational objectives.
The level of understanding of various styles of writing is defined as reading comprehension. The proficiency of reading deeply related to the ability to identify words quickly and store the information in memory. When the identification process is difficult for the students when they use much of their energy of processing memory to read and recognize the individual words and as a result, their ability to understand is greatly affected. Researchers believe that it is very important for the children to learn to recognize the printed text and analyze it, regardless of whether they can read it on their own or not. The process of comprehension begins at the nursery stage. On the other hand, some researchers believe that this approach is not useful particularly for young children because they think that kids should learn to decode different words in form of phonics before developing analytical thinking. Teachers often use the technique of round-robin re, adding. It's a process in which teacher call upon students individually turn by turn to read a piece of a given particular text. It was evident that this method of reading test focus more on comprehension rather than teaching it.  ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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