StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

The Wechsler Intelligence Scales - Research Paper Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Running Head: WECHSLER INTELLIGENCE SCALES The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Introduction This report provides a review of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales. The discussion includes the titles of the various scales and their publication dates, the purpose of the scales and the populations for whom they are designed…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER92.1% of users find it useful
The Wechsler Intelligence Scales
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "The Wechsler Intelligence Scales"

Download file to see previous pages Currently, the scales are available in three versions, they include WAIS-III, which measures adult intelligence, WISC-III, which measures intelligence in children, and WPPSI-R, which is designed for children aged between 4 and 6 ? years (IUPUI, 2010). There have been several revisions to improve the test ability of the scales and to include more population groups since Wechsler published the first scale in 1939. The purpose of WAIS-III is to measure adult intellectual ability. The scale is in its third edition, and is designed for individuals aged between 16 and 89 years (Pearson Assessments, 2011). The scale is administered in the form of visual, performance, and full tests for durations of between 60 and 90 minutes. The scale’s norms include IQ and index scores, which are all designed to test the individual’s intellectual ability in a comprehensive manner. The scale’s internal structure is composed of subtests that include tests on verbal comprehension, perceptual organization, working memory, processing speed and visual memory. The validity and reliability of WAIS-III are supported by correlations with previous editions of the intelligence scales and by clinical studies on adults with hearing impairments, retardation, and other forms of cognitive disabilities. The scale’s validity and reliability are also promoted by the availability of multiple tests administered to people with multiple intellectual abilities. WISC-III Also developed by David Wechsler, the purpose of the third edition children’s intelligence scale, (WISC-III), is to test for verbal and performance abilities among children aged between 7 and 16 years. It includes tests on information, coding, arithmetic, vocabulary, and comprehension (Kamphaus, 2005). Verbal abilities are tested through oral subtests while performance abilities are tested through nonverbal problems. Although all tests are timed, bonus points are awarded for faster work and older children have to earn much higher points to rank with the appropriate age group. The test has several subtests grouped into the general areas of verbal and performance scales. Verbal scales are designed to measure language, memory skills, reasoning and general knowledge while performance scales are meant to measure problem-solving, spatial, and sequencing skills. Administration of the test is done by trained examiners to individual examinees and a complex test material is usually required. In scoring, the test scores are converted to standard scores and computed with a standard deviation of 3 and a mean score of 10. Scores in the subscales of verbal and performance areas are turned into IQ scores, and later summed to obtain the overall score. All scores obtained in the tests are normative with a standard deviation of 15 and a mean score of 100. The scores are then classified to indicate the individual’s class as follows: Beyond 130- gifted, 120-129- very high, 110-119- bright normal and 90-109- average (IUPUI, 2010). Individuals who score 85-89 are considered low average, 70-84 are classed as borderline mental functioning, and scores below 50 indicate cases of mild, moderate, or severe retardation. The multiple tests incorporated within the intelligence ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Research Paper”, n.d.)
The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Research Paper. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/education/1441742-the-wechsler-intelligence-scales
(The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Research Paper)
The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Research Paper. https://studentshare.org/education/1441742-the-wechsler-intelligence-scales.
“The Wechsler Intelligence Scales Research Paper”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/education/1441742-the-wechsler-intelligence-scales.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF The Wechsler Intelligence Scales

To What Extent Does the Concept of Emotional Intelligence Point Towards a New Means of Controlling Workers

Weber believed that ‘the specialized experts organized into smoothly functioning units by the bureaucratic managers would provide these elite managers with a decision-making ability foreign to the parliaments and the courts’ (Glassman et al., 1984, 5). However, in order for the role of managers within bureaucratic environments to be understood, it is necessary to proceed to a thorough examination to the structure and the characteristics of such an environment under normal social and political conditions.

Moreover, the acceptance of Weber’s views on bureaucracy has led to the assumption that bureaucracy (Fry, 1989, 41) ‘is not necessarily rational, it may not be efficient, that other forms of orga...
11 Pages(2750 words)Assignment

The Thinking Ape: Evolutionary Origins of Intelligence

This mentality was the outcome of evolution, yet besides the well-documented evolutionary theory, there is one intrinsic aspect that can elucidate the cognitive and behavioral aptitude of these early humans, the concepts of worldview and paradigm. Worldviews are defined as a specific viewpoint and response to both the natural and the cultural milieu in which a collective of individuals live. They consequently produce worldviews based on their heuristic propensity to interpret their environmental and social settings (Schaefer, 1995, p.245). In a more particular tone, Koltko-Rivera (2004, p. 3) distinguished worldview as a group of hypotheses focused on the physical and social reality that can powerfully reduce effects on mental abi...
12 Pages(3000 words)Assignment

The National Drug Intelligence Center

...The National Drug Intelligence Center One of the most common crime in the United s nowadays is of drug trafficking. This lucrative business has become a trend in the American society and is increasingly becoming a threat for the state. Just before this crime could become a national issue the government of United States realized its potential and formed several intelligence agencies which would look after the drug traffickers. The National Drug Intelligence Center is the formation of government of United States in this regard. It was formed in 1993 and is operating till date. The NDIC has proved quite successful in achieving its tasks and has proved as an asset to the United States. This essay would further describe the agency in detail...
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay

Intelligence and the War on Drugs

When the Ronald Reagan Administration initiated its famous War on Drugs program in the 1980s with the catchy slogan “Just Say No”, the focus of the program was not exclusively Mexico. At that time, different pockets of Latin America posed threats of varying degrees, including Columbia and Brazil. But due to its proximity to the United States, and the increase in demand for cocaine and marijuana, Mexico has emerged as the greatest threat in recent decades. Compounding the problem of drug trafficking is the internal political chaos in Mexico. The Mexican governments of past and present have tried various methods and tactics for bringing the drug cartels under control but to no avail. It is a reflection of the governments...
7 Pages(1750 words)Assignment

Syscos Need for Business Intelligence Software

...Running Head: Cisco Case Study Introduction Sysco is essentially a food distribution company. It has various autonomous working divisions. The IT infrastructure of Sysco soon became obsolete. As a result, a lot of technical expertise was needed to extract useful data and predict the course of future demands and happenings. This demanded that immediate actions be taken which was not a very easy task. There was a lot of configuration and development that had to be done on the new software. This was because both the Enterprise Resource Program System and the data ware housing that Sysco was using was unable to keep up with the fast pace growth and the ever increasing data load. The paper focuses on Sysco’s need for Business Intelligence...
6 Pages(1500 words)Case Study

Galtons Definition of Intelligence, Sternbergs Model, and Spearmans Model

...Galton’s Definition Of Intelligence British psychologist Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911) was one of first people to study the measurement of intelligence (Pastorino & Doyle-Portillo, 2009, P.313). According to Galton, “intelligence is an inherited trait that is correlated with having superior physical abilities.” He believed that intelligence can be measured by measuring the physical abilities like reaction time, eye sight etc (Pastorino & Doyle-Portillo, 2009, P.313). Galton’s definition of intelligence is different from Sternberg, Spearman and Gardner’s definition of intelligence as he considers the physical traits of human beings like eye sight, reflex actions, strength etc., as aspects of intelligence while other psychologists consider...
7 Pages(1750 words)Term Paper

Self-Analysis and Emotional Intelligence Assessment

Kaplan describes that although all leaders have some combination of strengths and weaknesses, most leaders devote most of their energy to dealing with the weaknesses (2002). However, strengths are just as important, and if a leader doesn’t have an adequate understanding of their talents, performance can suffer (Kaplan, 2002, p. 20). It is essential for a business leader to take a measure of positive and negative traits and to apply what is found there in a way that will encourage growth and professional development. One way to discover strengths and reveal weaknesses is to take self-assessment instruments.

One of the instruments that had a surprisingly profound impact on me was the emotional intelligence assessme...
9 Pages(2250 words)Essay

Intelligence Collection Management

Intelligence collection management always aims for a valuable person having valuable pieces of information which can be a source of benefit for the company. The whole process of acquiring, organizing and making the intelligence information useful for the security agencies is also termed as the Intelligence Collection Plan. The creation of the Intelligence Action plan is also an important part because it is related to the management of the processes. The analysts must have an Intelligence Plan before any further development is done in this process.
Intelligence collection management is actually meant for a process of arranging and organizing all the possible available intelligence information or material which can be helpful f...
8 Pages(2000 words)Coursework

The US Intelligence Community

These contribute to several challenges faced by the IC today1.
For example, the Japanese fleet’s attack on Pearl Harbor, which was a surprise attack and the subsequent entrance of America into the Second World War, illustrated the need to re-engineer the outdated policies and organization of the IC. The changes made by the U.S. in the IC, which occasioned from World War II are still palpable today2. Some changes were later made when the Senate Committees came together with the aim of investigating the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), National Security Agency (NSA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), and Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to evaluate the possible abuses of power that transpired in the preceding years.<...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment

Cultural Intelligence

Questions regarding the IQ level of highly regarded individuals such as Albert Einstein or Helen Keller fuelled the need to comprehend human intelligence (Sternberg, 1982). The study of cultural intelligence is essential and relevant as it enables the understanding of the factors that influence cultural intelligence, its development, and relevance to an interaction between cultures and business activities worldwide.
Researchers defined intelligence as the ability to grasp concepts and solve problems, particularly in an academic setting (Ang & Van, 2008). Later, it became apparent that intelligence exists beyond the classroom environment. According to Francis Galton, human intelligence is a low-level property of the nervo...
7 Pages(1750 words)Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Research Paper on topic The Wechsler Intelligence Scales for FREE!

Contact Us