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Psychology of Teenage Pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome - Essay Example

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Different studies assert that pregnancy is a period of dramatic changes in woman's life. It is a crisis time, when the woman goes through deep psychological changes, and makes absolute revision of her attitude towards herself and her own identity. These changes are usually described for adult women, but when the same process is happening to an adolescent, 'the effect is often magnified'…
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Psychology of Teenage Pregnancy and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
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Download file to see previous pages (Jessor 2004, p. 45) The reasons for teenage pregnancy and fetal alcohol syndrome are mostly psychological and social, and it is understandable, that the influence and effects of teenage pregnancy may become terrible for young girls, if not properly treated.
In connection with this, Shonfeld and Mattson (2005) write, that 'the socialization deficits and views on stealing and obeying the law may serve as early indicators of later maladaptive behaviour. In terms of the overall moral maturity score, it is possible that this global measure is not sensitive enough in detecting delinquency in youth with prenatal alcohol exposure.' (Schonfeld & Mattson 2005, p. 24) What is meant here is that leaving school causes the lack of communication and socialization, which in its turn leads to the alcohol intake of a pregnant girl, which is destructive for her future child.
The problematic issue is whether the young girl will be able to go successfully through her pregnancy, as well as the proper bringing out and caring for the child. It is a well-known fact, that pregnancy is always a period of exaggerated emotions for the future mother, even if her conditions are optimal, which cannot be said about most pregnant adolescents. The time of pregnancy is the period of absolute physical and psychological changes, and these changes are even more vivid with the young teenage girls.
Schonfeld and Mattson also write in their article:
'As a developmental phase, adolescence is positioned between childhood and adulthood. Conventional theory holds that adolescence is a time during which teenagers assert their sense of identity, rebelling from the control and authority of their parents. Thus, it is not unusual to encounter a high degree of emotional turmoil in the adolescent.
When a teenager becomes pregnant, however, the continuity of both the physical and the psychological growth is abruptly interrupted.' (Schonfeld & Mattson 2005, p. 24)
This is also one of the main causes for the pregnant girl drinking too much alcohol, which finally leads to the FAS and thus to the most negative consequences for the child.
The psychological consequences of the adolescent pregnancy are various and vary in the wide range. Pregnancy is altering the conscience of the young girl, and thus she becomes preoccupied with different dreams and fantasies in relation to her future infant. But all these fantasies towards an adolescent are always much exaggerated, especially when the pregnancy was not planned (which is the most common situation). 'The emotional confusion that surfaces in the pregnant woman may also cause her to blur the boundaries between 'self' and 'other'. (Blos, 1980) With the child developing in the girl's body, their identities often tend to merge, which happens on psychological and also on the physical level. But this sense of merging will ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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