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Japan's Education System Before And After World War Two - Essay Example

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Japanese people showed immense courage in dealing with the crisis situations. The courage, patience and temperament of Japanese people in dealing with crisis situations have been proved many times in the past. This paper analyses Japan's education system before and after World War Two…
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Japans Education System Before And After World War Two
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Download file to see previous pages The teaching culture in Japan differs greatly from that of schools in the west. Teachers are particularly concerned about developing the holistic child and regard it as their task to focus on matters such as personal hygiene, nutrition, sleep that are not ordinarily thought of as part of the teacher's duties in the west. Students are also taught proper manners, how to speak politely and how to address adults as well as how to relate to their peers in the appropriate manner. They also learn public speaking skills through the routine class meetings as well as many school events during the school year (Education in Japan). Japanese educational system is trying to develop the complete personality of a child. Unlike the western educational system, the teachers in Japan undertake more responsibilities in the making of a Japanese child into a socially acceptable and professionally skilled future citizen. Elementary educational system is completely different in Japan when we compare it with that of other countries. The supervision of teachers in elementary classes is negligible. The children are free to make noises and have the freedom to engage in whatever the activities they like. At the same time, teachers may not give the burden of home works or assignments during this period. In short, Japanese children were able to enjoy the elementary education as much as possible. Such a curriculum approach is undertaken in Japan in order to prevent children from hating education. Even though elementary education is enjoyable to the children, the education following elementary education may not be so. The sense of competitiveness is created during the high school...
This essay stresses that Japan is not adamant in sticking with any particular system of education always. They update their educational system and curriculum time to time to meet the changing needs of the students. They are not reluctant in introducing or incorporating new technologies with the educational system in Japan. Computer assisted education is prominent in Japan at present. In fact the ability to adapt with new situations and challenges is the major reason why Japan is still able to maintain highest quality in educational sector. The influence of American culture was earlier visible in Japanese educational system after WW2. However, Japan has realized that the American model may not be suitable to their educational requirements and currently they are trying to move in the opposite direction. As a result of that, currently, “Education reformers in Japan are seeking some decentralization of control, greater diversification of institutions, less uniformity and standardization of curriculum, more flexibility in teaching, and more individualization of instruction”
This report makes a conclusion that Japan was able to maintain one of the highest standards of education in the world because of the creative educational reforms implemented in educational sector after WW2. Before WW2, japan was trying to imitate German and French education system and after WW2, they tried to imitate American educational system. However, they realized later that Japan needs an indigenous educational system and the above realization helped them to provide high quality education to its children. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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