Nobody downloaded yet

Whistleblowing - Research Paper Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
The term “whistleblowing” is derived from the English tradition where police used to “blow the whistle” to call the attention of passers-by and other police whenever they spotted an illegal activity…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER98.4% of users find it useful
Whistleblowing
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
"Whistleblowing"

Download file to see previous pages nzi scheme in 2009 – discuss their causes, analyze the importance of whistleblowing and find out the implications that this practice has had on corporate governance globally. At the end of 2001, Enron’s filing for bankruptcy made it the largest corporate bankruptcy in the history of the United States. This fall from being the most innovative company as per Fortunes Most Admired Companies survey was catastrophic. Enron’s misconduct were brought to the fore by Sherron Watkins, a former vice president who had previously warned Enron’s chairman that its current aggressive accounting tactics were nontransparent and would come back and haunt the organization. From her investigations Watkins became increasingly alarmed as it became apparent that Enron was using accounting loopholes, special purpose entities, and poor financial reporting to misrepresent earnings by hiding billions in debt from projects. Enron was a classic case of audit failure which forced the US government to come up with legislation to prevent such scandals from future occurrence. In 2002, WorldCom overtook Enron as the largest corporate bankruptcy in US history – a record that has since been broken by Lehman Brothers in 2008. WorldCom, like Enron, was also involved in use of fraudulent accounting techniques that classified operating costs as capital expenditures and inflated revenues through phony accounting entries to create a facade of financial growth and profitability. Even though the WorldCom board reacted swifter than Enron in dealing with the masterminds of this fraud, it still took the courage of Cynthia Cooper to blow the whistle on WorldCom's unscrupulous financial practices. In reaction to these scandals, the US government enacted the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 together with several amendments to the U.S. stock exchanges’ regulations. The new rules included different provisions whose purpose was to ensure alignment of incentives of corporate insiders with those of investors, and to reduce the likelihood of corporate misconduct and fraud. For example, the new rules mandated exchange regulations to require a majority of independent directors on corporate boards and independence of the board committees that choose new directors and compensate managers (Chhaochharia & Grinstein, 2007). This act also included provisions that protect whistleblowers by forcing companies to create dedicated mechanisms to record and track information provided by employees both anonymously and confidentially (Eaton & Akers, 2007). The third whistleblower case is somewhat different from the Enron and WorldCom cases with the whistleblower being an individual not operating within the company that committed the fraud. In this instance, Harry Markopolos took it upon himself to conduct an independent financial fraud investigation for close to a decade to uncover evidence that Bernie Madoff's wealth management business was nothing but a grand Ponzi scheme. Markopolos probed Madoff’s operation and kept filing formal complaints at the US Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) to have Madoff’s hedge fund investigated. The SEC never acted on Markopolos’ tips until 2008. Bernard Madoff Securities firm pitched investors a strategy he called ‘split strike conversion’ ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Whistleblowing Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved de https://studentshare.org/business/1429757-whistle-blowing
(Whistleblowing Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
https://studentshare.org/business/1429757-whistle-blowing.
“Whistleblowing Research Paper Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/business/1429757-whistle-blowing.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Ethics and whistleblowing
...?Ethics and Whistleblowing Table of Contents Context Page 3 Introduction 3 Research Question 8 Why Do Whistleblowing Matters 8 Approaches to Whistleblowing 9 Cases Where Whistleblowing Had Happened 9 ENRON Case 10 Dealing with the Whistleblowers 10 Advantages and Disadvantages of Whistleblowing in an Organisation 11 Why Should Companies Enable/ Promote Whistleblowing 11 Organisations Development of Effective Approach of Workplace Whistleblowing 12 Stakeholders and Their Needs 12 Codes of Conduct in Whistleblowing 13 Rules and Regulations in Organisation And Out 14 Leadership Style 15...
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay
Ethics n whistleblowing
...? Ethics and Whistleblowing Table of Contents Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………….3 Whistleblowing as an Ethical Dilemma……………………………………………………3Defining Whistleblowing…………………………………………………………………..4 Workplace Whistleblowing: Increased Incidence………………………………………….5 Whistleblowing: Cases and Their Implications…………………………………………….6 Whistleblowing: Implications to Policy……………………………………………………9 Collaborative Efforts between Stakeholders and Employees on Whistleblowing Issues……………………………………………………...11 Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………….12 References……………………………………………………………………………….....14 According to statistics published by...
11 Pages(2750 words)Outline
Whistleblowing policy
...(1992) defined whistleblowing as “the public interest disclosure whereby a fellow worker reports a concern about the misconduct or omissions of the fellow colleague(s) and or employers that may cause danger to other people or the organization.” Most actions of misconduct involve theft and compromising on the safety of fellow workers and the public. The importance of whistleblowing in an organization cannot be overemphasized especially in the current competitive world market, which exposes organization to insecurity in order to undermine the competitive edge in business. In this regard, many corporations are increasingly formulating whistleblowing policies as a measure of preempting such...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Discuss Critically the Implications of Whistleblowing for Accountability, and Raising and Escalating Concerns
...?Topic: Discuss critically the implications of Whistleblowing for Accountability, and Raising and Escalating Concerns. Course Date Healthcare centers are places all of us visit or are bound to visit in the near future. This is mainly because people face a number of health issues during their lifetime (Arszulowicz & Gasparski, 2011, p. 122). Medical professionals and hospital attendants have so much in their hands that they may at times neglect some of their duties. Some do this unintentionally will others neglect their duties and responsibilities out of ignorance. Recent research studies conducted in the US panorama showed that disabled patients were the most neglected and less attended (Boatright, 2009, p. 110). The...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Whistleblowing and Deviance
...?Whistleblowing and Deviance Deviance Deviance is the type of behavior to which society may act negatively. Deviance can be understood as violation of a norm or country’s law, connoting such behavior that is unacceptable for the society. Deviance ranges from ‘not being nice’ to ‘being criminal’. However, deviance and its definition differ with cultures. For example, somebody going against culturally defined gender roles may be deviant in some cultures, but not in the United States. Types of Deviance The rule-breaking behavior can be understood in three forms: Good behavior. This is the type of deviance that may break the social norms but intends something good to happen. For example, Dr. David Kelly had talked to a few...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Analysis for Paradoxes of Whistleblowing
...?Answer The major objective of the case is to highlight the paradoxes present in the act of whistleblowing. The believes that there are manycontradictions between the theoretical aspects of whistleblowing and the facts about it. He asserts that our understanding of whistleblowing has lots of contradictions to the reality of the whistleblowing as and when it occurs. The standard theory emphasizes on the empirical evidences of the probable harms which could in reality, contradict something which is wrong but cannot be constituted as whistleblowing because of lack of evidences, leading to harmful consequences. The new theory includes parameters that could...
3 Pages(750 words)Admission/Application Essay
Whistleblowing. Whistle Blowing Issues That a Potential Whistleblower Should Consider Before Blowing a Whistle in the Public Sector
...? Whistle Blowing By: Location Whistle Blowing Issues That a Potential Whistleblower Should Consider Before Blowing a Whistle in the Public Sector In a public sector whistle blowing against the government and the armed forces is a normal occurrence. A potential whistle blower should consider whether the issue is a criminal offense or not before blowing the whistle on the involved officials. Secondly, he should consider whether the issue involves are a breach of legal obligation like a contractual obligation awarded to the said officer. Thirdly, the case should involve an issue where justice was not effectively and fairly awarded to a victim or a party. Fourthly, the case should be one involving an issue concerning the endangerment... the...
7 Pages(1750 words)Essay
Who benefits from whistleblowing
...of whistle blowing is the public because it is through the activities of whistleblowers that they come to attain knowledge concerning what is going on in their lives. Whistle blowing allows the public to make an assessment of the activities that are taking place in their societies and to take action to prevent any negative effects of the said activities from affecting them. In most instances, whistleblowers, especially in the public sector, provide information to the public, not for their own benefit, but as a means of doing the right thing (Wilkey 2003, p.331). When whistle blowing takes place, it is for the benefit of the public because it makes the public aware of incidents that might be going on...
9 Pages(2250 words)Essay
Whistleblowing
...Whistleblower 23rd January Whistle blowing Describe the key characteristics of a whistleblower A whistleblower as defined by many philosophers to be a wrongdoer in different perspectives such, personality and company has numerous characteristics that makes one to be more powerful to present issues which affect the company and the whistleblower himself. The following are key characteristics of a whistleblower. Vision-Vision is a powerful characteristic that puts the company under a big pressure because it aims at cultivating deep the corporation culture and how the company responds to the employees among other roles. Diplomacy- The...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay
Reading Summary of whistleblowing and professional responsibility
...Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility: A Summary Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility: A Summary Introduction In the given work of“Whistleblowing and Professional Responsibility” (Bok, 1980), there has been a thorough discussion of the responsibilities of the whistleblower, reasons for whistleblowing and the potential consequences and concerns that might arise due to the act. I am impressed by the article and agree with the writer as she highlights the stakes of whistleblowing and the ins and outs of the act. What is Whistleblowing? Whistleblowing itself is an alarm that is caused...
1 Pages(250 words)Book Report/Review
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Let us find you another Research Paper on topic Whistleblowing for FREE!
Contact Us