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Why the Culture of Supernatural is So Popular in Our Society - Essay Example

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The present paper aims to dwell upon the popularity of science fiction in general, and films about supernatural in particular. Human societies have, as it occurs, by far held on to myths and legends of the past which, though lacking in exact physical evidences, live on and take variable form and shape in man’s imagination. …
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Why the Culture of Supernatural is So Popular in Our Society
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Download file to see previous pages Perhaps, it would have been a long journey down the lane of history to bear witness to the rigorous process of relaying accounts from way back the 16th century truth of ‘Bloody Mary’ and see how the modern-day belief significantly deviates from the valid main source. Thus, it is in such fashion of modified storytelling that we cease not as a society to have confidence in thought that supernatural beings cohabitate the Earth. Aside from plain communication, men have established popular media such as the TV, radio, films, and other technologically enhanced means of presenting stories that variably depict a monstrous character. Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”, M. Shelley’s “Frankenstein”, as well as S. Meyer’s “Twilight” saga that promotes a romantic vampire in Edward Cullen all converge to form the typical concept that vampires are fanged bloodsuckers who are normally on the dark side yet are capable of maintaining their youth for eternity. Because of what technology can do through audio-visual effects, the image and role portrayed by a vampire as perceived via the villainous Dracula or heroic Edward Cullen all the more gratifies the public curiosity about the authenticity, if any, of their individual myths. Hogan and Del Toro state “Science becomes the modern man’s superstition -- It allows him to experience fear and awe again, and to believe in the things he cannot see” (Del Toro & Hogan, NY Times). From the daily encounter of reality and the use of senses, one may find it hard to deny the fact that science and technology work hand-in-hand to make things possible to the extent of stimulating a human psyche toward the realization that there exists a more powerful entity than mankind. Moreover, the findings in “Why Vampires Never Die”...
Aside from plain communication, men have established popular media such as the TV, radio, films, and other technologically enhanced means of presenting stories that variably depict a monstrous character. Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”, M. Shelley’s “Frankenstein”, as well as S. Meyer’s “Twilight” saga that promotes a romantic vampire in Edward Cullen all converge to form the typical concept that vampires are fanged bloodsuckers who are normally on the dark side yet are capable of maintaining their youth for eternity. Because of what technology can do through audio-visual effects, the image and role portrayed by a vampire as perceived via the villainous Dracula or heroic Edward Cullen all the more gratifies the public curiosity about the authenticity, if any, of their individual myths. Hogan and Del Toro state “Science becomes the modern man’s superstition -- It allows him to experience fear and awe again, and to believe in the things he cannot see” (Del Toro & Hogan, NY Times). From the daily encounter of reality and the use of senses, one may find it hard to deny the fact that science and technology work hand-in-hand to make things possible to the extent of stimulating a human psyche toward the realization that there exists a more powerful entity than mankind. Moreover, the findings in “Why Vampires Never Die” suspect that humanity keeps to its core of nature an inevitable attachment to superstitious view of primitive ancestors who are pondered to have beastly and mystical traits. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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