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Social Economic Benefits if Tourism - Essay Example

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Present some of the main economic and social impacts of tourism. Briefly explain the three factors that influence the social impacts of tourism The social and economic benefits of tourism are widely debated in today’s society. On the one hand, the revenue that is accrued from the tourism industry cannot be forfeited, while at the same time, there may be clashes between the local communities and the visitors at the destinations…
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Social Economic Benefits if Tourism
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Present some of the main economic and social impacts of tourism. Briefly explain the three factors that influence the social impacts of tourism The social and economic benefits of tourism are widely debated in today’s society. On the one hand, the revenue that is accrued from the tourism industry cannot be forfeited, while at the same time, there may be clashes between the local communities and the visitors at the destinations. This might lead to social complications, that are however, not separate from the economic implications of the tourism industry. The revenue that is generated through the presence of a tourist destination is through multifold means. They create revenue primarily from the money that has to be paid by the visitor to view it. Apart from these, it leads to the creation of several associated means of livelihood, like the modes of transport that are used by the tourists to reach the tourist spot. Apart from this, facilities for the accommodation of visitors also have to be provided, which brings in a lot of revenue to the local tourism industry. There are also other shops that mushroom near a tourist destination, like those that sell souvenirs and refreshments. These revenue-generating institutions create employment for a lot of people, who in turn are able to spend this money on the development of other industries through a purchase of their goods and services. All these institutions and persons are also likely to generate taxes for the government, which is likely to trickle down into other sectors and enable the creation of better infrastructure, which in turn, will benefit the tourist industry itself. The economic benefits of the presence of a tourist destination are in a lot of ways, the prime factors of the social implications of these spots. Pride in one’s own culture and the feeling of community is a positive effect of the presence of such tourist spots. It contributes to the creation of the identity of the local community, which may however, detest the congestion that may result as the result of the tourist communities. Visitor behavior is thus one of the defining factors that influence the social effects of the tourism industry. The number of visitors and their level of politeness are crucial in determining the social impact of tourism. It also however, depends on the tourist destination as well, that is, the destination characteristics. These, along with character of local communities and cultures decide the social implications of tourism, be they negative or positive, since the support of local communities and the presence of good social and political atmosphere, is necessary for the success of the tourism industry. While pointing to specific developments and attractions discuss how waterfront redevelopment and revitalization of the Lachine Canal have contributed to the recent dynamics of tourism in Montreal. The development of an area that is a tourist destination is a complex affair. While improving the location as an attractive destination for the tourists, the government of that locality has also to take into account the concerns of the local community of the area. Issues of job loss and changes in the local economy affect the viability of the place as a tourist destination, since the cooperation of local communities is vital to the smooth functioning of the tourism industry. This is clearly demonstrated by the case of Montreal, where the discontent of the local communities affected the prospects of the city as a tourist destination. The re-establishment of the Lachine canal in Montreal was done so with the intention of enhancing tourism in the area. Private builders came into the picture with hopes of investing in residential complexes which would serve the purpose of accommodation for the visitors. This entailed a loss of industries which the local communities opposed and the projects were successfully stalled. The loss of jobs that resulted from uneconomical industries, however, meant that jobs were lost anyway. The government realized the need for its intervention in the matter. It was then that it was decided that the economy of areas adjoining the Lachine canal would undergo a change from a manufacturing-oriented economy to a service-oriented one. In 1995 the mayor of Montreal, Pierre Bourque and 110 other mayors decided on an urban restructuring plan whereby a variety of activities would be planned for the tourism of Montreal and the Lachine canal. They proposed the opening up of the canal and removing fills in the canal, which would enable the launch of boating services as a part of the attractions for the tourists visiting the area. This would not only increase the revenues of the place, but also cause a ripple effect whereby other commercial activities may be established around the canal, leading to the creation of more jobs. The government also decided to go ahead with industrialization at a limited scale, with the aim of creating jobs for the local communities of Montreal. This boosted the morale of the people o this area that reflected positively on the tourism industry as well. An increase in the construction of residential complexes in the area was also done to compensate for the decline in population in these areas which had occurred as a result of the loss of jobs in this area. An effective intervention was thus made by the government in tackling the problem of the Lachine canal. This has led to greater revenues and jobs for the local community and has also done wonders for the tourism industry of Montreal. Works Cited London, Mark. (Year). “Tourism and the Lachine Canal”. Name of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher. Print. p 141-5 Rollins, Rick; et al. (Year). “Tourism, Ecotourism and Protected Areas”. Name of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher. Print. 127-40 Read More
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