StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Post-Modern Tourism - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Tourist is somebody who travels for pleasure: somebody who visits places away from home for pleasure (Encarta,2004). Todays tourist was considered as an integral part of post modernity interms of current fashion and lifestyle brought by massive globalisation technology…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER93.6% of users find it useful
Post-Modern Tourism
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Post-Modern Tourism"

Download file to see previous pages That tourist attractions are precisely analogous to the religious symbolism of primitive peoples culture. Any touristic activities can even understand the taxonomies, values, ideologies, rituals, meaning systems, and differentiations of the modern world. That the international tourism industry does conventionally reproduce and reinforce the modernist ideological separation of the modern from the non-modern world . They have begun to be incorporate it into the ideologies and practices of the capitalist modernity (Tourist Production par 10).
Yochi Li's, 2005 (par 16) reported that tourism has become fetishized as a thing, a product and a behavior particularly economic in nature. That todays tourism was considered as the highest earner industry of the world. Tourism as a heuristic interprets modernity that is searching for an 'authentic' experiences in the world where people in the modern world are alienated. It is a form of liminal, heightened experience of seeking an authenticity outside the structure of mundane, ordinary, alienated work life ( Gazing par 8).
That tourism is a way for people to overcome the confusions of the modern world through sightseeing that helps organize a tourist's perception. Any "authentic" experiences in a distant locations reassures travelers that beyond the superficiality of their everyday lives that a true world still exists.
Modernity involves cultural differentiation both horizontally that it separate development of a number of institutional and normative spheres, of the economy, the family, the state, science, morality, and an aesthetic realm". Vertically that can be shown between culture and life, between high and low culture, between scholarly or auratic art and popular pleasures, and between elite and mass forms of consumption. Postmodernity as Urry describes as a decline in the barriers between these realms. This decline or de-differentiation is part linked to the growth of mass media. Media have provided access to the culture of the elite, reducing the distinctiveness of their lifestyles. That media helps keepping events either kept in " private and what can be made public" informations( Urry par 5).
But in post-modern tourism, tourist are trying to collaborates with the people who stage touristic sites in an 'inauthentic' touristic pastiche, and where "no single, authentic tourist experience" is possible. In other words, tourist are expecting different level of modernity and post modernity which is searching for 'true authenticity' to exist in response to alienation (Gazing par 9 & 13). Thurot and Thurot (as cited in Gazing par 12 )argued that tourism doesn't reflect the alienation of modernity, but rather it reflects people who are trying to follow a particular lifestyle which is important to their own culture.
This time tourism is highly significant to humanistic conditions of modernity and post-modernity which are considered as one best industry of the world in response to present social conditions (Gazing Par 17). That recent people's lifestyle wants to get out from heavy work load, social problems, and various activities and now people wants to relax and have a short leisure time as a way of recharging themselves. These would makes them more efficient, productive, achiever and getting higher work performance in any organization if ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Post-Modern Tourism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words”, n.d.)
Post-Modern Tourism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/sociology/1525681-post-modern-tourism
(Post-Modern Tourism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 Words)
Post-Modern Tourism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 Words. https://studentshare.org/sociology/1525681-post-modern-tourism.
“Post-Modern Tourism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 3000 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/sociology/1525681-post-modern-tourism.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Post-Modern Tourism

Police and Society: Post 9/11

The paper then takes note of a number of initiatives that have attempted to combine local policing with intelligence work. This shift from crime-prevention to counter-terrorism has had a profound effect upon these local law enforcement divisions; lack of proper funding has also undermined these projects, leaving local officers with the ability to prevent terrorists, but either lacking in resources or risking becoming dependant upon intelligence divisions. The paper will then turn to a consideration of two local communities, Dearborn, Michigan, and Las Vegas, Nevada, that have been involved in these initiatives, and considers the impact of counter-terrorism policing upon the wider local law enforcement of the region.

By...
12 Pages(3000 words)Case Study

The Importance of Tourism to the World Economy

Since the eighties, perceived risk research has been of ongoing interest to tourism researchers, Dolnicar (2005) and Dickson, Chapman, and Hurrell (2000)  states. Contributions often include those which investigate positive risk as a factor in increasing tourists who are seeking a thrill. On the other hand, there are also those who view these risks as something negative, thus avoiding the destinations which are haunted by different risks such as diseases, terrorism and other forms of political instability (Dickson & Tugwell, 2000).

The current qualitative research inquired about the risks perceived by young people as regards both domestic and international traveling. A sample of 23 was interviewed for this purp...
15 Pages(3750 words)Research Paper

Dental Veneers as a Breakthrough in Modern Dental Technology

In today’s fashion-conscious world, porcelain and composite veneers remain some of the most popular choices for people seeking to improve the esthetics of their teeth. Porcelain veneers have several advantages when compared to composite veneers including durability, resistance to staining, and amount of tooth structure removed during the procedure.
First and foremost, the porcelain veneers are very durable. They are also very thin – usually between 0.5 - 0.7 millimeters – and brittle, although once bonded to a healthy tooth structure they can become quite strong. The bonding process increases durability and veneers made of porcelain can last for many years, oftentimes between 10-15 years depending on how wel...
8 Pages(2000 words)Term Paper

Traditional Women in the Modern World

It is within the family that many attributes of gender inequality are generated and replicated. Economic and interpersonal dependence on both genders and in various instances more vicious forms of inferiority, are classic elements of marriage and family. Women’s long-established roles leave them with the trouble of widespread domestic and nurturance obligations in addition to limited authority within the family. These trends represent gender inequality within the home and are echoed in the ideology justifying a gender-separated workforce in which women’s earnings and prospects are disproportionate to men’s. While almost every woman has some family bonds to men, by their kinship ties to their fathers and brothers,...
9 Pages(2250 words)Assignment

What Are the Most Important Factors in Explaining the Rise of the Modern State

Though the existence of the state can be felt in different walks of everyday life, yet it is an intangible whose nature is impossible to grasp. As a political institution, state embodies the concept of sovereignty. Devetak (2007) describes it as a political unit or a country that possesses sovereignty. State can thus be described as a single, unified whole confined within territorial borders. The state is built in a core geographical area with allowances to a certain extent on the boundaries. According to Strayer (1970), a state exists in the hearts and minds of the people. The collective personality of the state renders it immortal. The state is a multi-faced concept that is fuzzy around its edges. Consequently, we cannot develop...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Analysis of Tourism and Hospitality Law Case

 The main issue that needs to be tackled first is whether there is a valid contract between Richard Brat, carrying on trade as Brighton Greens, (buyer) and Molly and Kelly trading in First Grade Granny Smith apples as Holy Farm.

Apparently, there was, when considering their verbal and written mail sent by Richard to Holy Farm on August 1 reading as follows –“Please deliver 20 boxes –Granny Smith ‘Brighton Greens’. Cheque mailed.“

It may be seen that the mail order does not specify the category or grade of apples to be supplied, but one of the implied conditions of sale could be that the goods ordered need to correspond with the goods inspected and tested.

In th...
8 Pages(2000 words)Case Study

The Functions of Modern Central Banking

It now directs and supervises banking activities through a complex set of tools and instruments that embody the country’s monetary policies.
Central banking can be traced to the 17th century Swedish Riksbank. The bank was created in 1668 as a joint-stock bank and helped the Swedish government with its monetary needs as well as serve as a clearinghouse for commerce. Just a few decades after, or in 1694, England established its own joint-stock bank called Bank of England. It was established primarily to buy the country’s debts. Other European countries soon followed and established their own national banks not only to serve their debts but also to solve monetary disarray as in the case of France’s Banque de Fr...
7 Pages(1750 words)Case Study

Humanistic Buddhism: A Way of Nirvana for Modern Man

However, how many people in today’s modern world are ready to renounce their life of comfort and materialistic pleasure to know the ultimate truth of life? Hardly anyone will be ready to renounce the pleasures of life. Hence, as Buddhism was believed to be a religion of suffering and severe self-discipline, very few people from the modern world were ready to practice it. However, Humanistic Buddhism, by modifying the teachings and simplifying the practices of the religion, gave a fresh and renewed beginning to Buddhism. Humanistic Buddhism, by modifying its practices to suit the social demands of modern life, has not just saved Buddhism from dying out but has also helped people to find happiness and satisfaction in life by s...
8 Pages(2000 words)Assignment

Senegal and Its Implications on Tourism

The country has a rich natural and cultural wealth, which forms the basis for tourist attraction. The main religions in the country are Muslim which forms the largest percent, Christian, and traditional religion (Binns, 2002). The big population of Senegal is found in rural areas, where the western-central region is densely populated. In the cities, there is a mixture of Senegalese, Europeans, and Lebanese, but Senegalese forms the largest population. The national language used in Senegal is French and is commonly used by educated people (Binns, 2002).

Researches show that Senegal was inhabited in ancient times. Islam occupied the land as early as the 11th century thus making many Senegalese to be Muslims. The French So...
7 Pages(1750 words)Assignment

Discovering the Tragic Hero: Ancient and Modern

...Discovering the Tragic Hero: Ancient and Modern The concept of the tragic hero was first brought forward in ancient Greek mythology through the writings of the philosopher Aristotle as he described the important individual characteristics the tragic hero must possess. Although Aristotle outlines three requisite character traits that the tragic hero should possess, he qualifies the definition of the tragic hero with a set of events that must also take place before the hero can be considered truly tragic. Once this process is understood, it is easy to see how the sudden downfall of a mighty man, such as Oedipus the King from the play by Sophocles for example, would be dramatic and shocking to a public dominated by strict social classes...
9 Pages(2250 words)Essay
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Post-Modern Tourism for FREE!

Contact Us