Nobody downloaded yet

Criminal Adaptation To Strain - Essay Example

Comments (1) Cite this document
Summary
Every person is taught on the various ways that can allow him or her to emerge successful in life. The purpose of the paper "Criminal Adaptation To Strain" is to discuss the various forces that lead to an increase in the likelihood of a criminal adaptation to strain…
Download full paperFile format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER96.7% of users find it useful
Criminal Adaptation To Strain
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample "Criminal Adaptation To Strain"

Download file to see previous pages The strain theory lays emphasis on the way in which that the society is structured, and the limited mechanisms that people have available to them to allow them to realize the goals that they desire. This theory perceives crime as a product of the frustrations and anger that people feel when they fail to achieve the goals that are before them. In this perspective, therefore, it is evident that the forces that are generated socially are the ones that force people to engage in deviant behavior (Stiles, et al., 2000). These strains are not distributed evenly in the society, and they are prevalent in those groups that are associated with high crime rates (Richard & Messner, 2002).
When based on the breakdowns that are attributed to social order, especially with respect to the unequal access to success, normlessness (anomie) serves as one of the sources of these breakdowns. The concept of anomie was adopted in order to help explain the increased risk of suicidal activities that are produced by the social changes that are noted in the society (Merton, 1996). For instance, anomie suicide is used to refer to the acts that are associated with self-destruction that emerges when the society's norms are noted to the breakdown in an abrupt manner. These occur especially during incidences of political crisis or economic depression (Messner & Roenfeld, 2007).
General Strain Theory Concept
Robert Agnew developed a version of the strain theory, which he referred to as general strain theory (GST). General strain theory lays emphasis on the forces that influence the strain level that an individual portrays. This theory tries to explain the reason as to why the strained people tend to engage in criminal activities more while compared to those who are not strained (Agnew & Brezina, 2002). By basing his arguments on psychological, sociological and research in mental health, Agnew managed to expand various adaptations that a person may respond to, especially when reacting to the strains that are prevalent in the social environment (Nikkos, 2008). Based on Agnew’s beliefs, it is evident that there are a large number of forces that influence the choice that one makes with respect to adapting to criminal and non-criminal acts. He also lays emphasis on the concept of interpersonal relationships (Messsner b & Rosenfield, 2001). For instance, GST provides descriptions that are related to the relationships that do not treat people the way in which that they wish to be treated (Piquelo & Sealock, 2007). There are a number of negative relationships that make people to engage in strain. There are as follows: There are those people ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Criminal Adaptation To Strain Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words”, n.d.)
Criminal Adaptation To Strain Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 words. Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/sociology/1490120-criminal-adaptation-to-strain
(Criminal Adaptation To Strain Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words)
Criminal Adaptation To Strain Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words. https://studentshare.org/sociology/1490120-criminal-adaptation-to-strain.
“Criminal Adaptation To Strain Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1250 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/sociology/1490120-criminal-adaptation-to-strain.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (1)
Click to create a comment or rate a document
br
brownheaven added comment 2 months ago
Student rated this paper as
I never thought 1250 words essay could be written in such a free manner. I loved the research of this essay. Will definitely use it for my own work!

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Criminal Adaptation To Strain

Script Adaptation

...Visual Arts and Film Studies   June Script Adaptation The first scene may begin with the protagonist’s (Bridget) monologue. She is a young slim girl, who is not satisfied with her life. There is no smile on her face. It is not very difficult to read pain and confusion on girl’s face and in her behavior. Bridget is going here and there along the scene. There are practically no lights on the stage. Everything is in green colours. This is a symbol of girl’s young age and inexperience. The protagonist sighs and says that everything is the same every day. Nothing new happens in her life. She gesticulates very actively and addresses the audience. Her eyes are constantly moving as if the girl is asking someone from the audience...
1 Pages(250 words)Coursework

Perceptual adaptation

...? Psychology Perceptual Adaptation Prism adaptation is described as a phenomenon that the motor system adapts new visuo-patial coordinates instituted by prisms that displace the actual visual fields. When the prisms are eliminated, the strength of the adaptation can be measured through spatial deviation of the motor actions in an opposite visual displacement developed by prisms, a process referred as aftereffect. This study was developed to identify the variables that have an effect on the acquisition and maintenance of the aftereffects. Subjects were expected to throw balls to a target situated in front of them before, during, and after the lateral displacement of the...
4 Pages(1000 words)Lab Report

Biological Adaptation

...Experiments that Demonstrate Adaption in Sensation and Perception The concept of biological adaptation has profound impact on how the experimenter understands psychology. Sensory adaptation is temporal change in the responses of the senses to a continuous stimulus (Boulpaep & Boron, 2003). The individual often perceives it as a change in sensation over time (Boulpaep & Boron, 2003). To demonstrate, the experimenter conducts a number of experiments to deepen our understanding of neural adaptation. Here, the experimenter reports the methods of and responses to these experiments. For each, the sensory system involved and how adaptation applies will be...
3 Pages(750 words)Essay

Cultural Adaptation

...Cultural Adaptation: An Interview Intercultural interaction is defined by Ellingsworth (1998) as the encounter of one person from a certain culture of another host culture. This phenomenon is increasingly becoming common as movements of people among societies for personal or business travels become necessary. Cross-cultural encounters especially those that take a long time can be a stressful experience and this field is the subject of our inquiry. The important point is to determine other people's experience in adapting to their host culture. In this paper, I am to relate the result of the interview that I conducted with a Filipino nurse acquaintance of mine. The experience was quite enlightening as it...
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay

Strain Theory

...1. One of the main ideas of the Theory of Strain consist that a principal cause of criminality is the contradiction between values, at achievement ofwhich a society directs people, and opportunities of their achievement with respect to rules established by this society. This contradiction leads to that a person, who has not managed to receive the certain values following the rules, starts to deny the rules and aspires to receive the values at any cost. That is why people start to commit crimes. 2. Strain theory focuses on situations in which other individuals "punish" the juvenile. The second and third major types of strain deal with the two major types of...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Adaptation & Accountability

...Adaptation The paper will discuss the issue of adaptation in relation to healthcare organizations. The main stress will be made on the necessity forsuch adaptation. The work is based on the specific example of Duke University Medical Center and Health System in North Carolina. Its story of success and adaptation might serve as a model for healthcare organizations which go through difficult times. According to Laubach (1997), health care systems should adapt to the developing of new technologies, especially in creating new systems of controlling and spreading the data, but as far as the number of healthcare organizations in private sector grows faster...
2 Pages(500 words)Essay

Ankle strain

...Case discussion- Ankle Sprain Introduction Ankle is a joint in the lower limb which is formed by fibula, tibia and talus. Its purpose is to facilitate dorsiflexion and plantar flexion of the foot. The medial bony prominence of the ankle is called the medial malleolus and is formed by the tibia while the lateral malleolus is formed by the fibula. The joint’s stability is maintained by various ligaments and the arrangement of the bones. The ligaments on the lateral side of the ankle are anterior talo-fibular ligament, calcaneo-fibular ligament and the posterior talo-fibular ligament. The ligament on the medial side is the deltoid ligament (actually a ligament complex). Instability to the joint occurs whenever there is a fracture... discussion-...
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay

Discuss how the Strain Theory explains criminal behavior

...seeks to examine certain acts of deviancy that results into criminal behaviors in society. Merton notes that society always emphasizes the achievement of certain goals such as education and hard work and also emphasizes the means to fulfill such goals. However, in society not all individuals have equal access to the means of achieving such goals legitimately. This results into strain and anomie. In his theory, Merton highlights five modes of adapting to strain which is caused by limitation to socially accepted goals and means. He noted that restricted access to society’s goals did not ultimately result to individuals becoming deviant but the modes of...
1 Pages(250 words)Essay

Strain Theory

...that are devised to explain a group of facts. It emphasizes proof of ideas behind principles that have repeatedly been tested and widely accepted as responsible for a given phenomenon. In regard to strain theory, it explains the factors that push an individual to develop criminal behavior in the society (Agnew, 2006). Although each man is born free, the emerging character is shaped by many external environment factors and this serves even crime mind development. Criminological theory plays a central role as far as understanding of crime is concerned. Past research indicates that criminology theory explains the forces behind emotional and psychological transformation that shapes a...
14 Pages(3500 words)Thesis

Strain Gauge

...LAB REPORT: STRAIN GAUGE By Location Table of Contents .....................................................................................................................................3 Introduction................................................................................................................................3 Aims and Objectives..................................................................................................................4 Equipment..................................................................................................................................4 Experimental...
4 Pages(1000 words)Lab Report
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Criminal Adaptation To Strain for FREE!

Contact Us