Social Justice. Social Values, International Human Relations, Institutions And Social Justice - Essay Example

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This paper aims to define Social Justice with the help of different theories, perspectives and policies. Social justice has immensely increased due to criminal and unethical activities throughout the globe…
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Social Justice. Social Values, International Human Relations, Institutions And Social Justice
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Download file to see previous pages In addition to this socialist and feminist perspectives are also explained. What is Social Justice? Economic and political policies often use the terms ‘social justice’ with different associated meanings. The meaning of social justice emphases upon the fact that disadvantaged groups of the society must be treated on equivalent basis i.e. there should be an equal distribution of resources and goods among all communities. The second meaning has a deep relationship with the rights of the disadvantaged groups of society. However, more meanings can also be related to social justice but these are most acceptable among politicians and economists (Bankston, 2010). There are numerous theories discussing social justice in regard to different perspectives. Following are the two basic theoretical perspectives of social justice: Social Values, institutions and Social Justice In this respect social justice refers to the establishment of a just and fair rule so that every individual is able to avail the basic needs of life such as biological needs, safety, health, education etc. This ultimately leads to the disclosure of innate human capabilities. People begin to explore new opportunities around them hence leading to overall economic development (Gil, 2009). International Human Relations and Social Justice This indicates the development and sustainable lifestyle of all the societies and communities existing in the world. Therefore as per the requirements of international human relations, social justice is the establishment of preferable living conditions throughout the globe. In order to achieve this level of justice economists and politicians are required to share resources, goods, knowledge and services (Gil, 2009). Contribution of Philosophers, Sociologists and Political Scientists There are many theories and publications that emphasize upon the extensive contribution of philosophers in the field of social justice. The data and facts represented by these philosophers play a substantial role in defining the role of social justice to avail global peace and prosperity (Ayelet Banai, 2011). One of the most acknowledged philosophers in history is Karl Marx who contributed a lot in the early development of social justice. He withdrew from the old concept of social justice and formed entirely new theories. For instance, Marxism, communism, socialism, etc. (Loberfeld, 2004). McLachlan is yet another contributor of social justice from recent times. He defines it as a virtue rather than an amazing value or fairness. Virtue is a divine action which is done to gain the pleasure of Creator. McLachlan has associated the act of justice to divine acts such as virtue (McLachlan, 2005). Political scientists present the idea of social justice as the prevalence of truth and fairness through the contribution of government and political institutions. They argue that social justice cannot be maintained without the participation of politics since justice is a fundamental human right and politicians aim to fulfill these rights (John Rawls, 2001). Socialist perspectives With the commencement of 20th century, Socialist Movement also started with the main focus of removing capitalism and establishing social justice. Their primary concern was to eliminate inequality so that every individual of a society can have an equivalent opportunity of excelling in life in addition to improving the lifestyle of people, particularly their attitude and reactions to certain situations. The socialist perspective in relation with social justice worked for building coalition on the international level and transferred the money flow from rich to the poor so that there can be harmony ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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