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Drawing on relevant theory, evaluate the proposition that biomedicine has contributed to increased freedom and autonomy for wome - Essay Example

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Drawing on Relevant Theory, Evaluate the Proposition That Biomedicine Has Contributed To Increased Freedom and Autonomy for Women Table of Contents Table of Contents 2 Introduction 3 Biomedicine: Development 19th Century Onwards 4 Biomedicine’s Effect on Women Autonomy and Freedom 5 Conclusion 9 References 11 Bibliography 13 Introduction Biomedicine is referred as medicine created by applying the principles involved in natural sciences with special emphasis on biochemistry and biology…
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Drawing on relevant theory, evaluate the proposition that biomedicine has contributed to increased freedom and autonomy for wome
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Download file to see previous pages The modernized scientific medicine of the western origin is generally referred as “biomedical” because it tends to give an explanation of health in biological terms. It emphasises on the learning in context of body structure that is anatomy and the physiology or the systems involved in a body structure, thus enabling to better understand the various mechanisms of a human body such as the heart, brain, nerve and artery among others (Lloyd, 2012). Health of living things can be described as a state of the body when all the parts are functioning normally. In case of any little abnormality due to virus attack on the human body, or occurrence of any such internal changes or any wearing out of parts the specialists are required to take necessary steps to mend it and keep the system running (Lloyd, 2012). The requirement of medical practitioners facilitates to get rid of any imbalance in the body. The best way otherwise thought of is being protective and leading a healthy life in order to prevent the need of such practitioners. The discovery of Biomedicine or Biomedical studies has provided with the knowledge about the various causes leading to infectious diseases. During the Industrial Revolution, there was a widespread of various diseases thus the public health movement was brought to practice. The key of such health movements were the relationships of the individuals with the natural or manufactured environment around them and that to enhance the wellbeing of human, an intervention to modify the environment is important (Lloyd, 2012). This essay intends to focus on the relevant theories and evaluate the contribution of biomedicine on the increased autonomy and freedom for women. Biomedicine: Development 19th Century Onwards The importance of medicine goes hand in hand with the importance of health as it is seen to act as the catalyst in repairing any kind of damages in the human anatomical system which includes the biological as well as the physiological aspects of a human body. Biomedicine is a concept to connect both the aspects of human body and provides an edge to the study of medicine for providing better support to mankind in order to combat with the unnecessary ailments that attack the human body (University of Bath, n.d.). In the nineteenth century onwards, the modernization of biomedicine took place with the advent of two major developments namely; the Cartesian Revolution or Rene Descartes and Pasteur 1850’s development of ‘Germ Theory. Both of these developments still have their influence in this modern world and are also considered as the basis of modernization in the world of medicine today (University of Bath, n.d.). The Cartesian Revolution is a dualistic approach explored by Rene Decartes. This approach uses a mechanistic view to look at issues and solve them accordingly. In context to this theory, human body is viewed as a machine and thus repairing of the same is done accordingly (University of Bath, n.d.). The ‘Germ Theory’ developed by Pasteur has a different interface to look at the causes of a disease. Pasteur believed that the transmission of disease is done by the microscopic micro–organism. These organisms as referred to by Pasteur are germs that happen to float in the air. During 1870’ ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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