We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.
Nobody downloaded yet

Introduction On Rural Population And Land Tenure - Essay Example

Comments (0)
Summary
An essay "Introduction On Rural Population And Land Tenure" claims that rural life all over the world has undergone tremendous changes in the last 50 years. Countries have witnessed the total paradigm shift in socio-economic parameters during this time…
Download full paper
GRAB THE BEST PAPER
Introduction On Rural Population And Land Tenure
Read TextPreview

Extract of sample
Introduction On Rural Population And Land Tenure

Download file to see previous pages... According to the 2011 National Population census, rural population in Canada has been rising steadily over the years, where at presents it’s estimated that over 6.5 million persons (19.6%). However, in terms of proportion, rural population as a percentage of the total population had been declining. For example, in 1851, 9 out of 10 persons used to live in the rural areas as opposed to the current 2 in every 10. Though Canada has the lowest population of rural population among the G8 countries, it faces similar challenges in terms of land resource management and food security (Statistics Canada, 2012). The increase in rural population has resulted in numerous changes in rural agriculture in terms of labor, organization, and mobility. In addition, as more people move them to the urban areas, social organizations in rural areas have also changed. For example, growth in urbanization towards rural areas and expansion of the economy away from non-farm activities has resulted in more people leaving farming to work in manufacturing and service industries (Statistics Canada, 2012). Some of these people may be working in rural areas but not in the farms. As a result, farm families are reducing, though the rural population is rising slowly. Another key change in rural population that is affecting agriculture is the increasing number of industries in the rural areas that are offering a better part-time job. Most rural population, therefore, prefers to work off-farm, though they still reside in rural areas....
For example, in 1851, 9 out of 10 persons used to live in the rural areas as opposed to the current 2 in every 10. Though Canada has the lowest population of rural population among the G8 countries, it faces similar challenges in terms of land resource management and food security (Statistics Canada, 2012). The increase in rural population has resulted in numerous changes in rural agriculture in terms of labour, organization, and mobility. In addition, as more people move to the urban areas, social organizations in rural areas have also changed. For example, growth in urbanization towards rural areas and expansion of the economy away from non-farm activities has resulted in more people leaving farming to work in manufacturing and service industries (Statistics Canada, 2012). Some of these people maybe working in rural areas but not in the farms. As a result, farm families are reducing, though rural population is rising slowly. Another key change in rural population that is affecting agriculture is the increasing number of industries in the rural areas that are offering better part-time job. Most rural population therefore prefers to work off-farm, though they still reside in rural areas. Production systems have therefore become capital intensive and more mechanized, save for a few areas where farmland is small due frequent sub-divisions. On the same case, wealth increase in rural population has seen most farmers increase their participation in markets to enhance their revenues (Stiles and Cameron, 2009). New developments in land tenure Land tenure has undergone tremendous changes in Canada right from the agrarian times where land was communally owned, tenancy/ lease and ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment
CHECK THESE SAMPLES - THEY ALSO FIT YOUR TOPIC
Why the Spanish Carribean was unable to maintain control over its own Industries
WHY THE SPANISH CARRIBEAN WAS UNABLE TO MAINTAIN CONTROL OVER ITS OWN INDUSTRIES The Spanish Caribbean depended almost entirely on the sugar plantations as the major institution in economic development. At the end of World War I the Caribbean highlands produced almost a third of the total sugar sold in the world market.
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
To what extent today's business broke through limits of ethics and respect towards others
The major concern by the foreign nations is for the massive production of food and biofuel production. While those investments are not a rare phenomenon, a rampant growth in size and number is overly notable. Present land deals also differ from the past investment deals due to the truth that they do not really attend to the domestic wants within the investing dispensation but rather cater for expansive world markets (Larsen).
4 Pages(1000 words)Essay
Quality of Care in a Rural Population
It is a difficult task to provide healthcare in some of the rural communities in the US. The quality of that healthcare once established is sometimes not what it needs to be for either the local people or those that travel through on their way to elsewhere.
2 Pages(500 words)Essay
Ethiopia
The climate in the Ethiopian highlands happens to be cool, while the lowlands tend to be hot (Cities of the World, 2002). Ethiopia has a population of 61 million, which is growing at an annual rate of 2 percent (Cities of the World, 2002). Ethiopia has one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world that stands at $ 120 a year (Cities of the World, 2002).
6 Pages(1500 words)Essay
MSc Planning Practice & Research - Affordable Housing
This research will examine other possible reasons behind the affordability problems. The inability of local people to purchase residential property can result in out-migration, especially of the
40 Pages(10000 words)Essay
Illustrating your answer with specific examples, evaluate the impact of structural adjustment programmes on agriculture in southern Africa
They deal with macroeconomic policies or fiscal and monetary policy and involve features such as; liberalisation, currency devaluation, export-led growth, reduced government
12 Pages(3000 words)Essay
Housing and regeneration in developing countries (housing study)
The challenges that are faced due to the increased growth of population from the rural areas to the urban areas is the housing problem, thus the urban areas do not cater for all the housing needs of the people who have moved to these areas. Nigeria is experiencing fast
14 Pages(3500 words)Essay
Growth of Poverty and Slums in Cities in the Global South
countries have not yet provided information sufficient to ascertain their true human development indices, current information holds that a total of 88 countries of the world fall under the medium human development bracket (that is, those with HDI less than 8 but greater than 5)
13 Pages(3250 words)Essay
Examine the factors that led to the formation of the first Labour Government in 1924
One of the most vital accomplishments of the first Labor government was the implementation of the Wheatley Housing Act that gave government grants that local authorities could use to construct affordable houses
8 Pages(2000 words)Essay
Mao Zedong
The dynasty rule resulted in prosperity and subjugation among the Chinese people with equal measure. Nevertheless, the dynasty rule could not accommodate the interest of all the
3 Pages(750 words)Essay
Let us find you another Essay on topic Introduction On Rural Population And Land Tenure for FREE!
Contact us:
+16312120006
Contact Us Now
FREE Mobile Apps:
  • About StudentShare
  • Testimonials
  • FAQ
  • Blog
  • Free Essays
  • New Essays
  • Essays
  • The Newest Essay Topics
  • Index samples by all dates
Join us:
Contact Us