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Communication to Mitigate Disasters - Research Paper Example

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A sense of urgency has to be instilled in the people responsible for disaster management. The following research paper "Communication to Mitigate Disasters" will investigate the technological, social and organizational challenges in communication during emergencies…
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Communication to Mitigate Disasters
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Download file to see previous pages Both man-made and natural disasters have communication challenges that match the magnitude of the crisis. Manoj and Baker (2007) observe that the most frequently cited reason is the lack of radio interoperability. All organizations at this juncture have to work in cohesion rather than work individually with radios set to orthogonal frequencies, which renders interagency communications extremely difficult. As more local, state and federal agencies get involved, the problem compounds. The communication challenges in emergencies and disasters go beyond the interoperability. Three categories of challenges arise – technological, sociological and organizational. These are the three key areas that help to develop and maintain healthy and effective disaster communication system.
The technological challenge is the rapid deployment of communication systems by the first responders and the disaster management group. Either the communications network (including telephones, wireless lines, power) is completely destroyed or because of a remote geographical area, they are non-existent even before the disaster (Manoj & Baker, 2007). Developing a new system where the old system has been destroyed is more challenging than setting up a new system where it did not exist. People prefer to depend on their old system and moreover, the old system may cause a disturbance in setting up a new system.
The magnitude of the storm was such that over 180 central office locations were running on generators as commercial power sources failed; about 100 commercial radio stations had to go off the air (Miller, n.d.). Up to 2000 cell towers were knocked down and Land Mobile communications were degraded. The devastation of communications disturbed the rescue efforts, emergency repairs and reconstruction (Bergeron, 2006).  ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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