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The Structure of Aviation Safety - Research Proposal Example

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This paper “The Structure of Aviation Safety” looks into the structure of aviation safety pertaining to controlled flight into the ground and human factors. Controlled Flight into Terrain arises when a serviceable aircraft is flown, under the supervision of a qualified pilot, into terrain…
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The Structure of Aviation Safety
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Download file to see previous pages The majority of (71%) CFIT accidents involve aircraft intended to take no more than nine travelers.
On the other hand, the large airplane with highly skilled pilots flying scheduled flights along known and common flight corridor is not invulnerable to CFIT, for example as proved by the crash on December 20, 1995 of American Airlines Flight 965 flight from Miami, FL to Cali, Columbia with 167 passengers and crew on board. One hundred and sixty-three people died in this mishap. This accident is as well important since it was the first crash of a Boeing 757 that resulted in fatalities. Additionally, the losses linked with CFIT are inexplicably high. It is accounted that three-quarters of all CFIT mishaps cause the death of most passengers and crew on board the aircraft (Moroze and Snow n. pag.).
Controlled flight into terrain generally happens at speed and as a result, lots of such mishaps are deadly. According to the Advisory Circular 1 of 2009 for Air Operators the importance is the proper preparation, good decision-making, and being able to securely maneuver the aircraft all through the entire operating range. As CFIT implies that the aircraft is operating correctly, the key basis for such accidents is what is usually considered the pilot error. Consequently, it is the pilot's duty to make certain that he or she is trained for the flight, that the aircraft is appropriately prepared for the flight, and that the flight is flown as per the correct rules and aircraft operating limits. Ground proximity warning systems and the new terrain awareness and warning systems using GPS have the capability to lessen CFIT mishaps on takeoffs and landings. These methods present tools for pilots to use to elevate their protection while operating near to terrain and obstacles. Conversely, all pilots should identify the restrictions of his or her information base and what bits and pieces are incorporated in the database. ...Download file to see next pagesRead More
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