StudentShare
Contact Us
Sign In / Sign Up for FREE
Search
Go to advanced search...

Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China - Essay Example

Comments (0) Cite this document
Summary
Buddhism entered China during the first century B.C, from India through the Silk Road trade route and Central Asia in the process of trading activities between Chinese and the Romans…
Download full paper File format: .doc, available for editing
GRAB THE BEST PAPER97.9% of users find it useful
Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China
Read Text Preview

Extract of sample "Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China"

Download file to see previous pages On the other hand, the artifacts from Kushan, which were based on Pakistan Buddhist civilization, were identified in western China, during the period when China had extended their power to Central Asia, and there were cultural ties between China and Central Asia. This association offered a chance for the Chinese people to learn about the Buddhism by the mid first century, thereby making the Chinese Buddhist learn about its existence. Nevertheless, the paper will focus on the discussion of ways in which Buddhism entered China and difficulties and adaptation in the Chinese culture. One of the ways in which Buddhism entered in to China was through a translation, which involved selection of terms for explaining the Buddhist conceptions in Chinese; thus, they applied Taoist expressions to translate. Chinese people commenced to relate Buddhism with the existence of Taoist tradition, and they later understood the teachings of Buddha. Buddhist text continues despite, a period of political disunity after the fall of Han Dynasty during the third century, which was associated by unrest caused by war. In fact, there was increased popularity in this period, whereby the Chinese monks became aggressively concerned in the establishment of monasteries and teaching Buddhist knowledge. There were rules established with a devotion to the Buddhist, which led to construction of much temples and participation in Buddhist ceremonies public talks, thereby expanding the rulers on the earlier catalogues on Buddhist texts. Entry of Buddhism was facilitated by a Chinese monk referred to as Dao-an, in the fourth century, though he shifted from one place to another due to the political instability, he wrote and lectured about Buddhist teachings. He also gathered copies of translated scriptures, prepared a catalogue, and invited translators such as Kumarajiva, from Kucha. Therefore, Kumarajiva applied Dao-an's disciples in translation of numerous texts and revised the Chinese translations. Moreover, his translations became popular thus contributing to the spread of Buddhism in China, and some of these translations have been used even in the present days. The political instability contributed to dispersion of Kumarajiva's disciples, and this contributed to the spread of Buddhism to other parts of China. Difficulties and adaptations in Chinese culture There were difficulties related to the nature of the attacks on the Confucian side, which were aimed at eliminating Buddhist institutions, and reduce their strong hold in the Chinese society. There were several Confucian attacks against clergy and spread of Buddhist doctrines, where the entire Buddhist religion was attacked. In this case, there were other difficulties resulting from the Chinese society, which was switching to the Confucian populace, thereby making the Buddhist society face a lot of attack in their pursuit of remaining prevalent and the philosophy of Chinese civilization. Nevertheless, these attacks were strong enough to hinder the spread of Buddhism in China, though these religions offered brilliant ideas and compelling rhetoric during the sparring back in forth between the philosophies. There were significant points that Confucians aimed at responding to in relation to the Buddhist philosophy and this included the attacks on the land properties and the excesses of Buddhist clergymen (Cultural China, 1). On the other hand, there were benefits for the numerous clergymen in their attempts to possess a piece of land, which was luxurious. There was an allotment prize lands for the clergymen by the Buddhist follower, where there was an institution ...Download file to see next pages Read More
Cite this document
  • APA
  • MLA
  • CHICAGO
(“Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words”, n.d.)
Retrieved from https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1461552-what-were-the-major-ways-that-buddhist-ideas-and
(Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words)
https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1461552-what-were-the-major-ways-that-buddhist-ideas-and.
“Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 Words”, n.d. https://studentshare.org/religion-and-theology/1461552-what-were-the-major-ways-that-buddhist-ideas-and.
  • Cited: 0 times
Comments (0)
Click to create a comment or rate a document

CHECK THESE SAMPLES OF Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China

Main Ideas of the Politics of Representation

The reason for phenomenon is that art is not static, but rather interactive with its audience and the political and social ideas of the audience’s present as well as the symbols inherent in the particular forms used. The postmodern movement, with its emphasis on illuminating the sublime, brings these ideas to the forefront. “The political and the aesthetic are inseparable, simultaneously present, faces of the postmodern problematic” (Burgin, 1982). On examining the main ideas within the politics of representation I will draw on various philosophical ideas in relation to recent art practices and consider the topical question of visual representation as an instrument of control and power.
Any creative ide...
6 Pages (1500 words) Essay

Industrialization of China

The pricing system, common law and property rights in Britain and Holland were well defined; in China, too the private landholding property rights including leasehold and freehold rights became the basis to give the economy a boost.
In fact, China experienced a revolution in agriculture; the geographical expansion of China mainland was possible due to the peasants who were willing to move to new places as China took hold of further land. In return, the state-supported such peasants with financial and material aid. The state’s main revenue was generated through a tax imposed on peasants. It also became the single most source of employment in China. The economy thrived due to agricultural dominance. Britain too had agricu...
6 Pages (1500 words) Assignment

Practices and Principles of Adult Nursing

These would gradually reduce her little depression and give her more hope over her life. And also one fact should be noted that she is a 65-year-old woman, so she still has chances of recovery.

Osteoarthritis: The National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases has this definition for Osteoarthritis as “ Is the most common type of arthritis, especially among older people. Sometimes it is called degenerative joint disease or osteoarthrosis. Osteoarthritis is a joint disease that mostly affects cartilage. Cartilage is the slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones in a joint. Healthy cartilage allows bones to glide over one another. It also absorbs energy from the shock of physical activity&...
9 Pages (2250 words) Assignment

The Best Practices for Recruitment, Selection and Induction

The workers only form the crucial ‘cog’ in the running of the organization. And, only if these crucial workers are recruited or staffed optimally through an effective recruitment process, the organization can achieve optimum success. In the case of running an enterprise or organization, the recruitment function is a continuous process, and so the leader or the manager particularly the Human Resource Manager should perform the staffing function at all times. 

 It is necessary that the management must ensure constant availability of a sufficient number of efficient employees from managers, executives, technical persons to laborers, for the efficient functioning of the enterprise. Overall, the recruit...
6 Pages (1500 words) Term Paper

Country Analysis Framework: China

Its impressive economic performance accompanied by a huge current account surplus of $304 billion in 2007, serves as a beacon to the audacious foreign investor. A multitude of factors has contributed to this phenomenal success of a country with more than one sixth of the world’s population. In brief it is a burgeoning market for luxuries and semi-luxuries.
I seek to focus the attention of the company management on the three fundamental but interrelated factors – strategy, context and performance. Strategic initiatives of a nation are basically determined by a set of broader predefined policy objectives that outweigh otherwise unimportant presumptuous goals. Context acquires both a national and an international sig...
9 Pages (2250 words) Case Study

The Economic Impact of the Emergence of China and India

...Running Head: [short [institute of affiliation] a. Refine the analysis of the forces and trends you completed for theWeek Two assignment. The Automobile Industry today is becoming increasingly competitive, with the shift in global economies, the continuously rising fuel prices leading to a simultaneous rise in consumer preferences towards fuel efficient cars, the coming of age of Western economies and the emergence of Asian super powers such as India and China. These external environmental factors along with certain significant global issues such as, growing concern for environmental protection, and the trends towards greener and cleaner cities, governmental initiatives to reduce carbon emissions, and issues concerning protection...
10 Pages (2500 words) Assignment

Business Operations of Starbucks in China

“Starbucks opened its first store in Hong Kong in May 2000 and currently has 51 stores. Guangzhou opened in August 2003 and has 12 stores in Southern China, including six stores in Guangzhou and six stores in Shenzhen (BNET).” Starbucks has entered the Chinese market through joint ventures with companies like Mei-Xin and Macau. The company in order to strengthen its operations and brand image in the country has recently decided to extend the term of the joint venture agreement made with the above-mentioned companies. “As part of the transaction, Mei-Xin (International) Ltd., will also acquire a 30 percent interest in a joint venture to operate Starbucks stores in Chengdu (BNET).”

Apart from the a...
6 Pages (1500 words) Case Study

Project Management: Best Practices and Stakeholders Perspective

Employees of functional divisions are assigned or detailed to a specific project and then re-assigned back to the organization when the project is completed.
Project management is defined by the Project Management Institute (PMI) as the application of knowledge, skills, tools, and techniques to project activities to meet project requirements; and its methodology as the planning, monitoring, and control of all aspects of the project and motivation of all those involved in it to achieve the project objectives on time and to the specified cost, quality, and performance.” Being a temporary, one-time endeavor, it differs from the organization's operations and processes which are its current and permanent work to create a pro...
6 Pages (1500 words) Literature review

International Communications: Democracy in China

The Party’s domination over the media has meant that the news media is required to accept Party ideology as its own, propagate Party programs and policies and accept the Party’s leadership. (Zhao, 1998:19). The Party closely surveys media content and media mentoring is performed by special teams of veteran Party workers (Zhao, 1998: 21). The Chinese Community Party views the role of the media in the political process as being based on its theory of political communication which in turn is derived from its basic philosophy of the mass line spelling out three distinct power levels, the Party Cadres, ordinary Party workers and the masses. While the people are the basis for policymaking, they do not participate in decision...
6 Pages (1500 words) Article

China Faces Pressure over Currency

Making its products cheaper in the US and thus encouraging imbalanced trade. It has been universally agreed that the free-floating Yuan would be significantly worth 15 cents.
Chinese economists feel that the impact has been over-exaggerated and particularly to America from Yuan revaluation. In particular, a stronger Yuan will not reduce the US’s trade deficit as there is a very smart segment of overlap between China and America Production and hence the US will not be able to replace Chinese imports. The consumer will end up paying more for imports from china or Vietnam and this would be like imposing a tax on US consumers.
The World Bank chief also disagrees with the US’s suggestion on China's currency rise a...
9 Pages (2250 words) Assignment
sponsored ads
We use cookies to create the best experience for you. Keep on browsing if you are OK with that, or find out how to manage cookies.

Let us find you another Essay on topic Buddhist Ideas and Practices in China for FREE!

Contact Us